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Marnie - Collector's Edition


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Product Details

  • Actors: Tippi Hedren, Sean Connery, Diane Baker, Louise Latham, Martin Gabel
  • Directors: Alfred Hitchcock
  • Writers: Jay Presson Allen
  • Producers: Alfred Hitchcock
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Full Screen, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Dubbed: English, French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Universal Studios
  • DVD Release Date: May 30, 2000
  • Run Time: 131 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (288 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305839395
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #214,992 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Marnie - Collector's Edition" on IMDb

Special Features

  • The Trouble With Marnie
  • Archives
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Production Notes
  • Cast and Filmmakers
  • Recommendations

  • Editorial Reviews

    The Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock creates a spellbinding portrait of a disturbed woman, and the man who tries to save her, in this unrelenting psychological thriller. 'Tippi' Hedren is Marnie, a compulsive thief and liar who goes to work for Mark Rutland (Sean Connery), then attempts to rob him. Mark impulsively marries the troubled beauty and attempts to discover the reasons for her obsessive behavior. When a terrible accident pushes his wife to the edge, Mark forces Marnie to confront her terrors and her past in a shattering, inescapable conclusion.

    Customer Reviews

    This is Hitchcock making a great technical film.
    A*
    Great movie it was a good thriller.it had many plot twists and a reasonable amount of suspense!
    Jacob
    Sean Connery gives an excellent performance as does Tippi Hedren.
    P. A. Schabram

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    108 of 113 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 1999
    Format: VHS Tape
    This was a critical fiasco when it came out in the early Sixties, and Hedren was widely blamed for the film's failure. Most film critics now see it as one of Hitchcock's greatest masterpieces from his late mature period, however--on a par with VERTIGO, PSYCHO, and THE BIRDS.
    This is not a film for those new to Hitchcock or his themes: the lack of a typical mystery or suspense plot may seem surprising for those expecting Hitchcock's more obvious bag of tricks. But as an in-depth character study of a truly unhappy woman and the (just as pathological) man who loves her, this one is every bit as riveting and fascinating and anything Hitchcock ever did--and when Marnie enters the Rutland mansion in her riding habit wielding a pistol after the foxhunting sequence you'll be at the edge of your seat to see what she'll do.
    The linchpin of the film is Hedren, who gives what must be the most underrated performance in Hitchcock's oeuvre--and clearly one of the very finest. Her refusal to warm up--either to Connery's character or to audiences--has made it a difficult performance for many to grasp, but those who dismiss it are greatly mistaken. Her joy when Connery brings her beloved horse to the mansion, her faltering childlike tones during the film's denouement, and her lightning-fast changes of mood during the great word-association secene show how truly talented and stunning this actress really is. You have only to see her incredible facial expression during the hunting scene when the hounds are ripping up the fox to shreds (and Marnie's aristocratic friends are laughing at the spectacle) to appreciate what a complex talent Hedren is, and how thoroughly Hollywood wasted its opportunities to use her well.
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    63 of 71 people found the following review helpful By gobirds2 TOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 29, 2000
    Format: DVD
    This is one of Hitchcock's masterpieces. It has been highly underrated and misunderstood by viewers and many critics alike. It is not a straightforward narrative as it deals with the compulsive and obsessive nature of its two main characters (Tippi Hedren and Sean Connery). The viewer has to become absorbed and drawn into the film's sights and sounds. The viewer has to elicit from what is seen and heard to fathom the motivations of the film's two main characters. Some of its images are just unforgettable and disturbingly haunting. Sound too plays an important part in the viewer's experience. In accompaniment is Bernard Herrmann's low key score. I watched this film again several times over. Herrmann's score is always present, yet never intrusive. I used to think this score was somewhat repetitive, but it is quite diverse. It complements the images in such a way that it almost evokes some hidden and suppressed experience from the viewer that creates an emotional bond with the main title character of the film. I found the DVD print to be of exceptional quality and most pleasing in the wide-screen presentation (a prerequisite in this format). The supplemental material on the disc was interesting and worthwhile, especially the discussion on the evolution of the film from print to image. I highly recommend this DVD and was surprised to see it released in this format prior to other Hitchcock films.
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    24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Reginald on November 8, 2000
    Format: VHS Tape
    One of the great disappointments of Alfred Hitchcock's career was the failure of Marnie to be the commercial and critical success he had hoped it would be. But some things seem to improve with age, and such is the case with Marnie. It's hard to figure out why this film wasn't immediately well received, especially when it has so many great Hitchcock elements that were winners in the past. Marnie (`Tippi' Hedren), is the portrait of a disturbed young woman who because of some, perhaps, childhood trauma cannot establish healthy relationships with men. Another part of her "psychosis" involves her being a thief as well. After Marnie establishes herself in one job, she robs her employer, changes her look and identity and then moves on to the next. When Marnie takes a job at Mark Rutland's (Sean Connery) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania publishing house (not his insurance company, as per the Amazon.com reviewer), the pattern begins again. Only this time, Connery finds himself drawn to Hedren, wanting to help, but at the same time, finding himself falling in love with her. Connery a student of zoology and human behavior, is intrigued by Hedren's problems and is determined to get to the bottom of her troubles. (This scenario is almost the reverse of Spellbound, where Ingrid Bergman is determined to find out what is causing Gregory Peck to act the way he does.) Connery convinces Hedren to marry him as a way of keeping her out of jail for her crimes (and to determine the psychological reason for her present behavior). That's when the real fun begins. Marnie is much more disturbed than Connery had originally suspected, but he is even more determined than ever to get her the help she needs.Read more ›
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    21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Eileen Corder on January 5, 2006
    Format: DVD
    Marnie is deliciously chilly, and like the children sing at the beginning, Margaret Edgar is ill. But Marnie is more than that. She's defiant, independent, resourceful. She's a survivor and we cannot help but love her for that. Granted, her psyche is like jambalaya on a bad day (and I won't spoil the ending for you), but she does experience moments of pure happiness when she rides her horse, Forio. Not ten minutes into the film, her bad self washed down the drain, there she is with her hair loose, a youthful expression of relief on her face, riding Forio off into the distance. Yes, this is her fantasy world, but she's truly happy there. Unfortunately, and all too soon, Forio turns into a yellow cab which deposits her back where it all began.

    Marnie comes from the lower class, born of a single mother, growing up during the war in a poor neighborhood on the waterfront in Baltimore. What were her alternatives? Through the film we see them. She could be a prostitute like her broken mother. She could be a secretary like the chatty, loyal gals in the washroom after work at Rutland's. In some wild scenario she could marry into money. Or...she could just take what she thinks she deserves. Certainly one or two of those wealthy folks at the fox hunt must have gotten their money in less than legal ways, considering how Hitchcock makes them look as they laugh at an animal being torn to bits by the hounds. Does Mark Rutland even know that an old, shabbily dressed and tired washer woman scrubs his floors every night? When Marnie robs the Rutland safe, we see, in a split screen, a well dressed Marnie on the right and the poor washer woman on the left. Marnie risks her precious freedom to avoid what she fears would be a dull and oppressive life.
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