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Initial post: Sep 9, 2009 3:10:57 AM PDT
I'm very interested in how these three topics inter-relate. It seems to me that (a) feminism has been very successful in empowering women, but (b) this has not led to women being happier, indeed studies show women in general to be unhappier with their lot than 50 yeas ago. Needless to say they blame men, eg for not being keen to take up house cleaning. Feminists don't like the reaity that many women were (and still are) perfectly comfortable and happy in traditional roles, and that the feminist movement never spoke for them. Highly assertive feminist wives are also difficult to live with, to the point that it cannot be a surprise that their husbands are deeply unhappy and/or leave them. Men are one of three groups in the modern age generally unsuited to marriage. The other two are introverts (54% of men, 47% of women) and those not sharing the same strong traditional religious convictions as their spouses. More in my forthcoming book 'THE MARRIAGE DELUSION - the fraud of the rings?' Details on Amazon and www.themarriage delusion.com. Thank you. Mike Buchanan

Posted on Sep 11, 2009 8:10:14 AM PDT
John Condron says:
Mr. Buchanan - You seem to be trolling through the Customer Discussions looking for even the most trivial excuse to promote your book. I just want to make a couple of observations. First, if you are going to call yourself "The book reviewer," you probably ought to review at least one book! Second, I note that your own book, which is not yet available, includes no independent reviews, so we have only your word for it. No reviews at all, just quotes from two "Shelleys," both of whom are dead and cannot have read your book. First we have a quote, apparently from the notes to "Queen Mab," one of the lesser works of 18th century Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. This seems like an obvious choice for for two reasons. First, like your own book, "Queen Mab" was self-published, with only a limited press run; and second, the poem is "infused with scientific language and naturalizing moral prescriptions." Obviously, I can't comment on the book itself, as it is unavailable, but the book description, presumably written by the author, is also infused with such language and prescriptions. Oh, there may be a third parallel. Shelley considered Queen Mab to be a "juvenile production," and worried that it could potentially "injure rather than serve the cause of freedom." Is "The Marriage Delusion" also a "juvenile production?"

Posted on Sep 11, 2009 8:45:02 AM PDT
No.
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Participants:  2
Total posts:  3
Initial post:  Sep 9, 2009
Latest post:  Sep 11, 2009

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The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work
The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work by Nan Silver (Hardcover - 1999)
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