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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless Tale of Adventure on Alien Worlds
This volume neatly collects the first three novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs' legendary "Barsoom" or "John Carter of Mars" series, A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, and Warlord of Mars.

When I picked up these books, I was somewhat familiar with their historical significance, and the role they've played in inspiring science fiction works that have come in the...
Published on February 10, 2012 by Bryan Weber

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56 of 65 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sadly incomplete
Let me start by saying I adore the John Carter of Mars books; I've read them many, many times over the years and I was really looking forward to being able to have the entire series on my Kindle. But I cannot in good conscience recommend this edition because the books included are incomplete -- when the edition was assembled, Disney appears to have dropped the forewords...
Published on February 17, 2012 by Joe


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless Tale of Adventure on Alien Worlds, February 10, 2012
By 
Bryan Weber (San Angelo, TX) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mars Trilogy: A Princess of Mars; The Gods of Mars; The Warlord of Mars (Paperback)
This volume neatly collects the first three novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs' legendary "Barsoom" or "John Carter of Mars" series, A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, and Warlord of Mars.

When I picked up these books, I was somewhat familiar with their historical significance, and the role they've played in inspiring science fiction works that have come in the years following the publication of John Carter's first adventure on the Red Planet. However, I knew little of the series, and didn't know what to expect. Would it read similarly to E.E. Smith's Lensmen series? Or would its narrative be similar to that of the works of H.G. Wells?

I am happy to say that the past hundred years have done nothing to stunt that glory of these tales. One need only an open mind and a vivid imagination to join John Carter of Virginia as he finds himself transported to a strange and alien world. With a willing suspension of disbelief, the reader finds him or herself strolling the alien soil of this neighboring planet alongside such larger than life characters as Tars Tarkas, Sola, Dejah Thoris, faithful calot Woola, and John Carter himself.

The style is engaging, and I found it difficult to tear myself away from these compelling tales of strange and distant worlds for any reason.
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56 of 65 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sadly incomplete, February 17, 2012
Let me start by saying I adore the John Carter of Mars books; I've read them many, many times over the years and I was really looking forward to being able to have the entire series on my Kindle. But I cannot in good conscience recommend this edition because the books included are incomplete -- when the edition was assembled, Disney appears to have dropped the forewords written by Edgar Rice Burroughs. These forewords are actually integral to the stories -- they tell how ERB received the manuscripts, whether from his uncle John Carter or from Jason Gridley (who was also in communication with Pellucidar -- most of Burroughs' series are very loosely set in the same world) and not including them means a loss of flavor and in some cases an abrupt and confusing beginning to the book as it appears in this edition.

I highly recommend the John Carter books; I just recommend that you get them in an edition that preserves their original state.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A sad farewell to a great adventure series, December 15, 2000
Other reviews appear to be speaking of the first book in the series, A Princess of Mars. John Carter of Mars is the 11th and last book of the Barsoomian adventure stories. In fact, this book is a combination of two stories: "The Giant of Mars", actually written by John Coleman Burroughs, and "The Skeleton Men of Jupiter", the first of a four-part series that was never finished.
"Giant of Mars" has long confused ERB fans, many of whom have wondered whether he actually wrote this story. The truth has been circulated for years but somehow doubt and literary legend seem to overwhelm it. John Coleman Burroughs did indeed write this story, and he admitted as much publicly.
"The Skeleton Men of Jupiter" is pure ERB space opera and it restores Barsoom's chapion to his former glory. This tale had the potential to become one of the all-time greatest ERB adventures, but he never wrote more than the first of four installments. Our hero resolves a major conflict and the reader is not left wondering if John Carter and Dejah Thoris survive, but their adventure is nonetheless incomplete.
Fans eager to read more about Carter's adventures need to get this book, but let the reader beware, it can only be unsatisfying. One is left with a sense of wonder, for Burroughs is said to have been burned out near the end of his life, but there is much about this story which is fresh and engrossing.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wartlord of Mars & Thuvia, Maid of Mars; CONFUSED REVIEWS, March 29, 2007
For some reason, Amazon has mixed in reviews here that have NOTHING TO DO WITH THIS VOLUME. All the talk about "the 11th book" in the series pertain to another volume altogether. I hope someone from Amazon reads this and finds the mistake.

That said . . .

The Mars series by ERB is excellent. I've read each book half a dozen times over the course of my life. Burroughs had an amazingly fertile imagination, but the Tarzan movies his mind look vapid.

But these books are his masterworks.

If you like adventurous science fiction you should love these.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars John Carter Rules, December 20, 2012
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Fast shipping. Item in prestine conditon. My wife hates me cuz I wont stop reading about John Carter. Go Deja Go Deja!!!!!!!!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars TWO CARTER NOVELLAS OF VARYING QUALITY, April 24, 2003
By 
s.ferber (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
"John Carter of Mars" is the 11th and final volume in Edgar Rice Burroughs' classic John Carter series, and is comprised of two novellas of varying quality. The first, "John Carter and the Giant of Mars," first appeared in "Amazing Stories Magazine" in January 1941; the second, "Skeleton Men of Jupiter," first appeared in that same publication in February 1943. (For full details on the complicated publishing histories of these tales, I refer all interested parties to the ERB List, one of the best Burroughs Websites on the Net.) As most people seem to know by now, the first of these tales was NOT written by ERB himself, but rather by his son, John Coleman Burroughs, who illustrated 13 of his father's books and drew the John Carter comic strip from 1941-43. In this tale, Carter is captured by Pew Mogel, a synthetic man who is bent on conquering Barsoom with his intelligent apemen and flying malagors. The tale is an important one in the Carter saga, in that his city of Helium is almost sacked and captured at the end of a tremendous battle. Sad to say, however, Burroughs Jr.'s writing style is not up to the task of depicting such colossal doings. So this pastiche of a tale comes off like the work of a talented amateur, even though Burroughs Sr. supposedly did assist in the writing. Burroughs Jr. makes many mistakes in his writing; internal inconsistencies and inconsistencies with previous Carter books abound. For example, the characters refer to Barsoom as "Mars" in this book, and the two moons, Thuria and Cluros, are for the first time given their Earth names of Deimos and Phobos. These moons are said to travel quickly across the sky, whereas in every other Carter book, it has been said that Cluros is a very slow mover. Pew Mogel slaps Tars Tarkas, Carter's Tharkian buddy, in one scene, yet in previous books, it has been established that Tarkas is around 15 feet tall! One of the intelligent apemen falls out of a high window to his death in a courtyard in one scene, even though the characters are in an underground laboratory! The Martian rats that play such a central role in this story are made to appear similar in size to the Earth variety, whereas in previous volumes, they were said to be as big as Airedale terriers! For the first time in the entire series, the men of Barsoom are shown using radios, TV sets and visiscreens; a rather surprising advent, given all that has come before. I could go on, but you get the point. Anyone who has read the previous 10 Carter books will immediately notice the difference in style and content, and that difference is very jarring. Still, the story moves along very briskly, and the action IS relentless.
The "Skeleton Men..." tale is much better. This novella was written by ERB himself, and is a real return to form. In this one, Carter and his mate are kidnapped by the Morgors of the planet Jupiter, who intend to study them preparatory to their invasion of the Red Planet. This is the first Carter tale to take place on a planet other than Earth or Mars, and so Burroughs is given free rein to let his imagination fly. This story features some good scientific speculation on what that giant world might be like, and for once Burroughs makes no slips as far as inconsistencies are concerned. However, the story ends right in the middle of Carter's adventure; apparently, Burroughs intended this to be a multipart saga, but never did get around to finishing it. Talk about leaving the reader wanting more! But at least the story of John Carter ends on a high note here, bringing to a conclusion one of the best swashbuckling fantasy series of all time.
Perhaps this is as good a place as any to note that the 11 Carter books that I have just read were the Ballantine/DelRey paperbacks of the late '70s to early '80s. These are the ones that feature beautifully imaginative yet faithful-to-the-story cover art by Michael Whelan. Sad to say, these paperbacks are quite a mess. I have never seen books with more typographical errors in my life. It is painfully obvious that these books were never proofread. This is surprising, given the sterling job that Ballantine/DelRey did with their "Best of" series of 21 great sci-fi authors around that same time. Still, the power of Edgar Rice Burroughs' vision shines through, so that even in these poorly put-together editions, the saga of John Carter on the planet Barsoom manages to captivate the reader, even after all these years.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thirty years ago this book opened a new world to me., October 9, 1998
By A Customer
"A Princess of Mars" began for me a journey which will last a lifetime. I lost myself as a youth and young adult, in first, the Martian series, then enumerable other Edgar Rice Borrough's tales. I have now begun the journey again with my 9 and 11 year old sons. The stories endure the test of time, impart lessons in life, and entertain in an unparalled fashion. Oh yes, Borrough's unique usage of descriptive vocabulary prompted my early fascination with the English language. Borrough's novels, and in particular the Martian series, has had a profound inpact on my life, and that of many of my family members. It is more entertainment than I had a right to expect, and I am thankful for the experience. Please read my favorite series chronicling the adventures of John Carter of Barsoom. You will not regret it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars John Carter -- a Gentleman Warrior, June 1, 2014
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I am a true sci-fi enthusiast and so excited to have discovered Burrows' Barsoom Series. It's very creative and the stories keep me riveted from start to finish. It's sci-fi /fantasy from the very infancy of the genre--and it doesn't disappoint. As a swashbuckler adventure in outerspace, I'm sure the only reason the stories haven't been made into movies (until "Princess of Mars") because the movie industry didn't have the technology to recreate his fantastic settings and
characters. I recommend the books to those who enjoy rollicking tales of warfare and chivalry. Though the stories would appeal to all ages, the vocabulary is not "dumbed-down" for younger readers.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Typos galore ...., July 17, 2012
This review is from: Mars Trilogy: A Princess of Mars; The Gods of Mars; The Warlord of Mars (Paperback)
The unwritten agreement between customer and publisher is the customer forks over the $ and the publisher gives him a book that is readable. I doubt that there were 5 pages in a row that didn't have typos, misused words, etc. Just when I am getting into the story, bam, what was that word supposed to be? Reads like the book was retyped in a third world country and the editor was on vacation. I love Burroughs stories, but Simon and Shuster's pathetic offering is an insult to ERB.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Took me back to the books I grew up on., June 3, 2013
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This review is from: Mars Trilogy: A Princess of Mars; The Gods of Mars; The Warlord of Mars (Paperback)
Reading now as an adult... I still enjoyed it. Some new insight an understanding as an adult reader this time.
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Mars Trilogy: A Princess of Mars; The Gods of Mars; The Warlord of Mars
Mars Trilogy: A Princess of Mars; The Gods of Mars; The Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Paperback - February 7, 2012)
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