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Martin Zweig's Winning on Wall Street Paperback – June 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Warner Books Grand Central Publishing; Rev Upd edition (June 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446672815
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446672818
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #391,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Financial adviser and Wall Street Week TV panelist Zweig has been fascinated by the stock market since childhood, he tells usnot industry or commerce as such, but the buying and selling of stocks to make money. He has evidently made a lot of it, and has won the confidence of readers of his financial newsletter. Zweig is more enthusiastic about the intricacies of his "technical" stock market approach than he can expect the average investor-reader to be. Nevertheless, he has produced here a clear and detailed analysis of market trends, interest rates, Federal Reserve policy, debt volume, market "momentum," etc., that seems to carry the technical side of stock-market theory as far as it can go. The result is a sure-fire system for beating the marketprovided you make no mistakes.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Zweig's "proven methods for market forecasting and stock selection" are presented in a simplified version of the approach he uses in his Zweig Forecast newsletter calculations. Tables show how well an investor would have done by following the buy or sell signals for his Super Model, which is constructed of various "monetary" and "momentum" indicators. He also subjects his decisions to "sentiment" and "seasonal" indicators. Scan earnings reports, he advises, be flexible, have patience and discipline, set stop orders, and "don't fight the tape." The drawback, common to all such systems, is that transaction costs and taxes are ignored. Nor does Zweig's claim that his model can be accomplished on one transaction per year square with his admonition to diversify into several stocks. On balance, however, the concepts are clearly presented, and his success will probably create a demand. Alex Wenner, M.L.S., Bloomington, Ind.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

This is one of the greatest books I ever read and I highly recommend it.
Shikhar Srivastava
You can find books that can help you make more money during bull markets, but if you want to KEEP the money you make this is the best place to start.
David P. Wester
Also very helpful was the scoring system Zweig has provided in this book.
Straddle1985

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Tony Ursillo on December 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
Winning on Wall Street is the first book I ever read about investing (back in 1990). Marty Zweig may not be the most glamorous or charismatic guru, but his disciplined and unemotional approach to the markets is what makes him my most revered market player. Famous for calling the 1987 crash (forever captured on the archives of Wall Street Week), Zweig has receded from public view considerably. He discontinued his valuable Zweig Market Letter about 5 years ago and ever since Rukeyser disbanded his elves, Marty rarely shows up on the show. So, this is your best opportunity to tap the mind of an investor whose success has lasted for decades.
Admittedly, Zweig's writing style is fairly academic (he's a PhD). The book is different from many in that much of it works to set forth a model which will allow you to be on the right side of the general market for its major moves. When you boil it down, the primary influences on the model are interest rates, and measuring the underlying strength of the averages. I can now attest firsthand to the durability of this model - I have been dutifully running it myself since 1990 and it has performed admirably. Major BUY signals came in 12/90, 1/96, and 1/01. SELL signals came in 5/94 and 9/99. Again, those were not perfect bottoms and tops, but allowed you to participate in the major upmoves and avoid significant stretches of downward activity. Other useful discussions include those on sentiment and seasonal indicators. The fundamental portion of the book leaves something to be desired - stock picking is not Zweig's strong suit. By the way, opinions suggesting that Zweig is a speculator are off the mark. In fact, his approach is designed to 1) minimize risk, and 2) catch the majority (middle portion) of a market move. (...) Winning on Wall Street has become one of my best reference tools. If you are serious about building your understanding of the markets and improving your investment results, this is a book that you must own.
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79 of 89 people found the following review helpful By John Kole on June 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
Zweig made his reputation as a market timer, and 2/3 of this book presents a detailed market timing model that incorporates both "money indicators" (e.g. prime rate, fed funds rate, consumer debt) and a basic momentum indicator. The model is relatively simple and the method is clearly explained. According to Zweig's data, the system produced remarkable results up through the final revision of this book (in 1996).

But, of course, you have to wonder... The book has been revised four times since its initial publication in 1986...and yet not a single revision in the past ten years. Hmmmm...wonder why?

Unfortunately, the obvious answer is the correct one. Zweig's "Super Model", which he touts as "The Only Investment Model You Will Ever Need" (yes, that's an actual chapter title), utterly failed after 1996. Some other reviewers claim to have followed the model successfully since the last edition of the book. I don't know what numbers they're working with, but I've done the very tedious work to recreate the signals the model would have given since 1996, using only actual data available as of the date it became available, following Zweig's methodology precisely, and applying it to the Value Line Arithmetic Index (a very close substitute for the proprietary benchmark he uses in the book). From March 1996 (the last data point in the book) through June 28, 2006, the Value Line Index produced a gain of 222.8% (buy & hold, excluding dividends). Following the Zweig "Super Model" long-only generated a gain of 95.5% (not including interest income while in cash), and following the model long/short produced a gain of only 18.4% (yes, that's total, not annualized...). So much for the "Super Model".
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By David P. Wester on August 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
A basic work that every investor should read. The best source for simple explanations of the mechinisms that drive bull and bear markets. "Outdated and misleading" says one reviewer who did not find it applicable for trading the .com mania in Feb 2000, but why that market crashed a month after the review was written can be found in Mr. Zweig's work. The fact is the theories and applications found in this book have correctly called every major market move since the mid 1980's. You can find books that can help you make more money during bull markets, but if you want to KEEP the money you make this is the best place to start.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I almost hate to tell you how good this book is, for fear that Zweig's Stock Screen will quit working for me if too many people know about it. I read the book, and in early 2005 I started using Zweig's stock screen (US stock market). The S&P500 made less than 5% in 2005, but I made 36% in 2005 on my portfolio using Zweig's screen! Here's how I did it.

First, I got an account at Scottrade, where each trade costs only $7. Then I joined the American Association of Individual Investors, which sells a computer program called "Stock Investor Pro". Stock Investor Pro has Zweig's screen (and a bunch of others) already programmed in, and you can download fresh stock data each week. Each week, somewhere between 10 and 25 stocks pass the screen. I base my buy/sell decisions on those results.

AAII also independently rates all those stock screens, and the long term perfomance of the Zweig screen topped all the others for cumulative gain from 1998 through 2005. In any given year, another screen may top Zweig's performance, but his screen is the overall winner by far. Even during the tech bubble collapse of 2000, Zweig's annual return was positive. It's annualized rate of return was over 40% over that 8 year period. That's an ANNUALIZED rate of return, not the cumulative rate of return. Don't believe those people who tell you that you can't do better than the S&P500 over the long term because the market is "efficient". I don't know what they're smoking, but it can't be too healthy.
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