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Marvel Masterworks: Amazing Fantasy #15 + Amazing Spider-man #1-10 Hardcover – January 1, 1987


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics; Volume 1 edition (1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0871353059
  • ISBN-13: 978-0871353054
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 7.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #355,080 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stan Lee is a man who needs no introduction. Nevertheless: Having begun his career with wartime Timely Comics and staying the course throughout the Atlas era, Stan the Man made comic-book history with Fantastic Four #1, harbinger of a bold new perspective in story writing that endures to this day. With some of the industry's greatest artists, he introduced hero after hero in Incredible Hulk, Amazing Spider-Man, X-Men and more -- forming a shared universe for rival publishers to measure themselves against. After an almost literal lifetime of writing and editing, Lee entered new entertainment fields and earned Marvel one opportunity after another. He remains one of Marvel's best-known public representatives.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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I read it really fast, I only wish they would release the next issues.
Mario G. Perez Fonseca
I am new into comics, and I found this collection to be easy to read and understand while still very much thrilling.
Bryan R.
With those words, Stan Lee closed the chapter on the first story of the Amazing Spider-Man.
Bryan Weber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 30, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I recently Bought this book after a long search for almost 4 months. When I finnaly got to open this book I was excited to find out how and who Spiderman was going to face in the first ever issues of the amazing Spiderman. This book is so unbeleivable I have to keep reading it, I literly can not stop. Filled with the first ten issues of the Amazing Spiderman (including AF15) and all of spiderman's first enemys. If you have a chance to buy this book you should definetly pay the fee and read this outstanding book. I love the drawings of Steve Ditko.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bryan Weber on April 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
"With great power must also come...great responsibility."-Stan Lee.
With those words, Stan Lee closed the chapter on the first story of the Amazing Spider-Man.
Spider-Man was unlike any super-hero before him. He didn't just pretend to be the wallflower like some other boy scout I could name. He was the social outcast, ostracized by his peers, rejected and alone. He was a teenager. Back then, teens were usually the sidekicks. As Peter Parker, he was the epitome of uncool.
And Spider-Man didn't become a hero out of some notion of civic duty, or revenge for a past sorrow. Instead, he was driven by guilt. The guilt of knowing that had he simply stuck out his foot and tripped a passing burglar, his Uncle Ben wouldn't be dead.
That story, and the first ten issues of Amazing Spider-Man, featuring the wall crawler in battle against deadly foes like Doctor Octopus, Doctor Doom, the Sandman, Electro, and The Chameleon, as well as guest appearances by the Fantastic Four.
The oldest and most classic stories preserved for all time here in a hardcover bookshelf edition that you can be proud to show off to anyone. THIS is what comic books are all about.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mario G. Perez Fonseca on March 1, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Finally, if you'd like to have the very first 11 issues of amazing Spider-Man youhave to look no further of pay thousands of dollars for orignal 60's comics, this collection presents the first issues of Spider-man. Get to know his origins, the first villians he fought and his life a super hero. Printed in high quality gloss paper, in full, glorius colour, the pencil here may not be what newest readers are used to. These are simple, straight forward drawings that are now cult classics. The text by the master himself, Stan Lee, are interesting, yet funny and direct enough. I read it really fast, I only wish they would release the next issues. This book is for readers who maybe owned the original comics back in the 60's or 70's and want to relive those moments. Great also for fans of Spidey who want to witness his origins. Definetely a must.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is a terrific book, printed on high-quality, non-acid paper, in color. The "essential" has no color, and is printed on cheap pulpy paper that will deteriorate in 10 years.
Ditko's genious deserves this treatment.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 21, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I started reading "The Amazing Spider-Man" with issue #62 and the appearance of Medusa (the Inhuman with the living hair). Eventually I worked my way back to the beginning, mostly through reprints of the early issues in "Marvel Tales." Once I got past the epic two-parter in issues #39-40 when the Green Goblin learned Spider-Man was really Peter Parker, I was not as impressed because the artwork for the first 38 issues was by Steve Ditko and not John Romita (Sr.). I was never really impressed by Ditko's artwork and when he left Marvel to work for Charlton comics I always thought those were pretty much the worst drawn comics around (except for the issue of "X-Men" that was Barry Smith's first work in comics). However, I have had a major change of heart. I am never going to be enamored of the way Ditko draws faces, but I have come to appreciate that the man was a master of composition in the field of comic books.
Collected within Volume 1 of the Marvel Masterworks series devoted to Spider-Man are his debut in "Amazing Fantasy" #15 and the first ten issues of "The Amazing Spider-Man." We all know about the radioactive spider, the death of Uncle Ben, and the lesson that with great power comes great responsibility. Stan Lee certainly created something completely different when he came up with a superhero whose bad luck was the only luck he had. But this time reading these issues just look at how Ditko sets up each panel, paying attention to both this compositional skills and his sense of pacing. In "Spider-Man" #8 there is a Spider-Man Surprise Extra in which "Spider-Man Tackles the Torch!" The short story is drawn by Jack Kirby and inked by Ditko. Compare it to the other stories and see how superior Ditko's layouts are.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Troy McFarland on April 19, 2013
Format: Paperback
This particular version includes Amazing Fantasy #15, and issues 1-7, as is mentioned on the cover. I wish I was more careful when I saw this, as the newer version of volume 2 starts at issue #11. So, I'm missing the stories from 8-10 in my Masterworks collection.

Otherwise, it is a fine book! The reproductions are really good, and the color is sharp. Even for new fans, it is worth reading. If nothing else, the more primitive art from the 1960s may inspire new artists today to get started in comics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Steve on January 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
OK, I'm going to be the spoiler. This volume appears to be true to the original stories, except in one important respect. In Issue #1, there always has been a prominent (and I suppose famous, or infamous) error starting on page 2 of the second story in which Spidey confronts the Chameleon. As we purists know, that error begins in panel 1 (top left hand corner) on page 2 of the original comic, then continues on to page 2, panel 5, later on page 6, panel 3 where Petey is studying the spider exhibit. That error, of course, refers to our hero Peter Parker as Peter PALMER (not Parker). Well, of all things! This Masterwork reproduction published 25 years after Issue #1 first hit the stands CORRECTS the offending error. Now, cleverly edited to match the original lettering, no longer is our hero referred to as Peter Palmer, but as (you got it!) Peter Parker. So, in the mind of this purist, this is NOT an exact reproduction of Spidey #1. I guess the rest of the volume is OK, but I haven't yet finished perusing it. Nevertheless, this bothered me enough to want to get it off my chest now. Incidentally, electronic versions of Issue #1, available for purchase on comic book websites, retain the original, unadulterated error of Peter Palmer. Perhaps, too, the Omnibus volume stays true to the original, but I don't feel like paying many multiples of the original sales price (say about $300, or more, on today's market) just to find out. So, for those purists out there, like me, who have clinged to their Marvel comics since the early sixties, you should be aware. It was somewhat disappointing, sorry to say.
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