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Marvel Masterworks: The Incredible Hulk, Vol. 1 (Second Edition) Hardcover – August 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Entertainment Group (August 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785111859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785111856
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 7.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #618,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stan Lee is a man who needs no introduction. Nevertheless: Having begun his career with wartime Timely Comics and staying the course throughout the Atlas era, Stan the Man made comic-book history with Fantastic Four #1, harbinger of a bold new perspective in story writing that endures to this day. With some of the industry's greatest artists, he introduced hero after hero in Incredible Hulk, Amazing Spider-Man, X-Men and more -- forming a shared universe for rival publishers to measure themselves against. After an almost literal lifetime of writing and editing, Lee entered new entertainment fields and earned Marvel one opportunity after another. He remains one of Marvel's best-known public representatives.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The Marvel Masterworks volume, "The Incredible Hulk, Volume 1" (2nd Edition) brings together the six issues from the original comic book of "The Incredible Hulk," which were published before Ol' Greenskin became one of the co-tenants of "Tales to Astonish" (first with Giant-Man and then Namor, the Sub-Mariner"). Unfortunately the Hulk always seemed to be particularly ill-suited to the 10-page story format since in pretty much every story Bruce Banner changes into the Hulk (or the Hulk changes into Bruce Banner). For that reason, the original six issues of "The Incredible Hulk" stand out in such marked contrast.

In issue #1 we meet Dr. Bruce Banner, the brilliant scientist who has invented the gamma bomb. Right before the big test a teenager, Rick Jones, drives out on the site. Banner goes off to get the boy out of there but his assistant Igor does not tell anybody, thinking this will be a way to get rid of Banner, who pushes Rick into a ravine right before the gamma bomb explodes. In the hospital Banner changes into the Hulk for the first time, in front of Rick Jones, who feels he should look out for the man-monster seeing as how Banner saved his life, which would tend to create a sense of obligation even in a teenager. Of course, Rick Jones would go on to the side-kick for not only the Hulk but also Captain America and Captain Marvel.

Ultimately I think the idea of the Hulk is better than the stories, especially the ones being told in these first six issues. The combination of the Dr. Jekyll & Hyde transformation with the Frankenstein monster is inherently interesting. Those classic references also explain why the better stories seem to be those in which the army is going after the Hulk rather than the less than stellar super villains who pop up.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 16, 2004
Format: Hardcover
"Marvel Masterworks, Volume 8" brings together the six issue-run of the original run of "The Incredible Hulk," before ol' Greenskin was sent off to "Tales to Astonish" to share with first Giant-Man and Wasp before the Sub-Mariner took over the other half. This explains why this is a relatively slim volume in the Marvel Masterworks series, which usually covers ten issues in the run of one of Marvel's comic book titles from the Sixties.
The Hulk was what Stan Lee and Jack Kirby came up with after the success of "The Fantastic Four" gave birth to the Marvel Universe. Trying to build on the success of the F.F. Lee wanted to come up with a character with superhuman strength, which was not exactly an original idea (i.e., see Superman), but Lee wanted to take the cliché concept and make it exciting and relevant. Lee knew that the Thing was the most popular member of the F.F. and had always had a soft spot in his heart for the Frankenstein monster, who never wanted to hurt anybody and was just trying to come to terms with those who wanted to destroy him. Borrowing from the story of Jekyll and Hyde as well, Lee and Kirby came up with a scientist who was accidentally transformed into by a nuclear accident into a raging gray behemoth. That is right: originally the Hulk was gray, but the coloring was inconsistent in that first issue and so Lee decided to go with green because (drum role) no one green characters were running around in comic books.
With the six issues of "The Incredible Hulk" reprinted in color in this volume you get the following: #1 "The Hulk," in which scientist Bruce Banner is hit by mysterious gamma rays when he saves the life of young Rick Jones, who was trespassing on the test site.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A reader from on March 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is not the same book as that reviewed below - there is some mistake here.As far as I know it was never released in paperback and was written when Len Wein was a child!
The book is a hardback collection from 1989 featuring the first six issues (the comic was cancelled after that)of the Incredible Hulk in his own magazine from 1962 & 1963. The quality of the reproduction & colors are superb.
The first issue he is grey, but as this did not work well with the printing capabilities of the time, from issue 2 he was depicted as the familiar "jolly green giant!"
With writing by Stan Lee and illustrations by Jack (King) Kirby (Steve - Spider-man - Ditko) took over with the 6th. issue's art), this is essential for anyone collecting the Hulk who can not afford the thousands of $$$ for the original comics (and who of us can!)Great stuff and brings back many memories!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Marvel released so many new comics in the early 1960s that several of their super heroes were launched without the character having been fully worked out. The Incredible Hulk is clearly one of these. Within the space of the six issues reprinted here, they changed his color, his powers -- he figures out how to fly by taking reaaallly long jumps -- his personality, and how he can be controlled. You would think they would have thought through these things before they started publishing. It might not be surprising that sales were apparently not high enough to sustain the book and it was killed after just six issues. In addition, they kicked the Hulk out of the Avengers. In that sense the Hulk was the one true flop among the early Marvel books. Still, I find these stories very appealing. The idea of the Hulk was a great one and early Lee and Kirby (and Ditko in issue 6!) is always worth reading. So, I would recommend this volume to anyone interested in the early Marvel Silver Age. It ain't Spiderman or Fantastic Four, but it ain't bad.
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