Marvin Redpost #2: Why Pick on Me? (A Stepping Stone Book and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.80
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: 100% Money Back Guarantee. Ex-library! Withdrawn stamped in book front and back. No markings noted in the text. Has a faint odor. Good: Copy has been read, but remains in good condition. Normal shelf wear on edges and corners. Binding is tight. Not real pretty but very usable. Eligible for Free Super Saver Shipping. Amazon Customer 24/7. Track your delivery to your door.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Marvin Redpost #2: Why Pick on Me? (A Stepping Stone Book(TM)) Library Binding – March 16, 1993


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Library Binding, March 16, 1993
$1.20 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4
  • Series: A Stepping Stone Book(TM) (Book 2)
  • Library Binding: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers (March 16, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679919473
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679919476
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,118,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It will be an underground classic, an easy reader that kids are dying to read."--(starred) Bulletin, Center for Children's Books.  

From the Inside Flap

  

Illus. in black-and-white. Marvin is shunned by his classmates, best friends, and teacher after he is unfairly fingered as a nose-picker by the class bully. "It will be an underground classic, an easy reader that kids are dying to read."--(starred) Bulletin, Center for Children's Books.  

More About the Author

author spotlight
Newbery Award-winning author Louis Sachar is the creator of the entertaining Marvin Redpost books as well as the much-loved There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, winner of 17 child-voted state awards.

Louis Sachar's book Holes, winner of the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, is also an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, an ALA Quick Pick, an ALA Notable Book, and was made into a major motion picture.

A Few Words From Louis Sachar
Of all the characters from Holes, why did you choose to revisit Armpit in SMALL STEPS?
LS: I tend to write about underdogs. It seemed to me that life would be tough for an African-American teenager from a low-income family with a criminal record. Especially someone stuck with the name, "Armpit."
Although this new book is about a character from Holes, the two books are very different. How would you explain to a fan of Holes what to expect from SMALL STEPS?
LS: I can't. I'm no good at describing my books. Holes has been out now for seven years, and I still can't come up with a good answer when asked what that book is about.
Could you imagine future novels about any of the other boys?
Do you think about what Stanley is up to now?
LS: I don't think too much about Stanley or Zero. I left them in a good place. Although money doesn't bring happiness, or give meaning to someone's life, the problems Stanley and Zero face now (and I'm sure they do face many problems) are less interesting than those faced by someone like Armpit.
Plenty of teenagers fantasize about what it would be like to be a young rock star.
You portray it as lonely. Tell us about that decision.
LS: The media tends to portray the teenage world as one where drinking and sex is taken for granted. In fact, I think most teenagers don't drink, are unsure of themselves, and feel awkward around members of the opposite sex. I thought it was important to show Kaira, a rock star no less, as such a person. Her situation, in many ways, is made more difficult as she has no social contact with anyone her age. She is trapped in a world of agents, record producers, and hanger-ons.
I'm imagining that off all the books you've written, Holes is the one that has changed your life the most. Not only did it win the Newbery Medal, it's also simply a popular sensation. Is this assessment accurate? What is this novel's continuing impact on your life? Would you consider it the book that you are proudest of?
LS: Not counting Small Steps, I think Holes is my best book, in terms of plot, and setting, and the way the story revealed itself. It hasn't changed my life, other than that I have more money than I did before I wrote it. I'm still too close to Small Steps to compare it to Holes.
Why do you typically write only two hours each day?
LS: Small steps. Every time I start a new novel it seems like an impossible undertaking. If I tried to do too much too quickly, I would get lost and feel overwhelmed. I have to go slow, and give things a chance to take form and grow.

Customer Reviews

She has read them all now and wishes there were more.
A. Stewart
You are going to read how Marvin solves his problems at school, caused by Clarence the bully.
Storace Tatiana Maria
I had a kid who hated to read but he loves these books.
Sunshine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By JES on July 7, 2000
Format: School & Library Binding
At the beginning of every school year, I read Marvin Redpost:Why Pick on Me? to my new 4th graders. Marvin has to deal with abully in his class who starts a rumor that Marvin is a nose-picker. Everyone believes the rumor is true, even Marvin's 2 best friends. Marvin's family supports him, and he resolves the problem in an interesting way that leaves the bully looking rather foolish. This is a funny book, a sad book, and an insightful book. I read it to my students to open up a discussion about bullying and teasing. There's a big lesson to be found in this little book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 22, 2001
Format: Paperback
Let's face it, kids can be cruel. Marvin Redpost goes to 3rd grade where kids are kids and adults sometimes don't investigate the situation completely.
While playing ball, Marvin is accused of picking his nose by the class bully. Like most bullies, he is just looking for something to taunt Marvin with and nose picking happens to be it. Of course, Marvin wasn't, and of course, it upsets him. He tries to stand up for himself, but everyone is so caught up in how funny-gross it is that no one is listening. The trouble starts with neither Marvito the wound. Very soon, Martin himself, now friendless, begins believing that he's a disgusting person. That is, until inspiration strikes and he finds out that we're really all very much alike (I'll not spoil the ending for you!!)
Sachar has done a tremendous job of taking the subject of bullying and elementary school obsession and putting it into a very readable form for young children. Bullies will bully and try to turn everyone against that one poor soul they don't care for at any chance they get. What often gives them more power, oddly enough, is the victim denying the bully's accusation; in this case, Marvin vehemently saying that he DOESN'T pick his nose. By Marvin constantly talking about it, he's actually feeding into the situation without knowing it. Better in these cases to ignore it and let it drop.
However, most elementary school children don't realize the power of ignoring mean comments like that or realize that the person doing the bullying will soon get bored with the whole thing if you don't respond. Though this tactic wasn't taken in "Why Pick on Me?", it's still a good suggestion for the "alternative solution" crowd who may use this in schools.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By nancy touchette on April 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
I loved reading this book as much as my child did (maybe even more). It is a story about a boy who gets unfairly picked on and in the end teaches us all a little lesson. Sachar is a gifted writer who remembers what it is really like to be a kid. A truly enjoyable book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
The book Red Post is an interesting and funny book. The book is about this kid that was playing wall ball and the ball went over the line. Then the kid he was playing against caught it but he said that it didn't go over the line. Then another kid said it went over the line. Then the kid that thought it went over the line, told Marvin to shut up because you were not watching, you were over there picking your nose. After that every body started to laugh. He said that he was not picking his nose and they all kept on laughing at him. The next day he figured out something and at school he kept on asking every body if they heard about what happened yesterday and he told every body that he didn't pick his nose, everybody kept laughing at him because he kept on reminding them. Then his own friends would not play with him any more.
The book's message is that if you're doing something don't say anything because they might catch you they will tell everybody and they could embarrass you. If they catch you do not ask everybody if they heard about yesterday because they will start laughing and you are the one that is reminding them about it, so don't tell them.
My opinion is that this is a good book. I liked it I think it is an interesting book and I would read it again. There were a lot of funny parts and it was a real cool book. I liked the book a lot.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Konicito on August 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
Louis Sachar, possessing tremendous range as a children1s lit master, bring us the Marvin Redpost series---smartly designed for the mid-second grade reader. The second in a now lengthy series, Sachar has poor Marvin---a likable rolly-polly sort of lead---embroiled in controversy. When a close call in a Wallball game leads to verbal sparring, a yard bully accuses Marvin of committing that most grievous of all elementary school sinsÐpicking your nose. Naturally, such an accusation makes for wildfire gossip around school and soon it seems the entire world (even Marvin1s teacher) seems to believe a most disgusting truth about our hero. Marvin1s solution for his way out of this mess is a brilliant stroke of psychology (and comic writing) and serves to illustrate some basic truths about being human. Not splashing on the same sort of wackiness as in his Wayside School pallet, Sachar offers up an easy ironic touch in the Marvin Redpost series.
The Marvin Redpost series is an ideal beginning Adopt-a-Book, blending approachable vocabulary with a straight-forward, yet sage storyline There is one Stumper that may be particularly helpful to kids, arising when Marvin1s teacher pens her report card comments. Another in a fine series that may hook kids on Marvin after they sample some as Adopt-a-Books...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews