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Marx's Religion of Revolution: Regeneration Through Chaos Paperback – July 1, 1989


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Paperback, July 1, 1989
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Institute For Christian Economics (July 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 093046415X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0930464158
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,208,790 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steven H. Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on February 6, 2012
Gary Kilgore North (born 1942) is head of the Institute for Christian Economics, and a prominent Christian Reconstructionist, who has written widely on many topics (including postmillennial eschatology).

This book was North's first full-length book (originally published in 1967), and was revised somewhat in 1989 (the original subtitle was, "The Doctrine of Creative Destruction"). He wrote in the Preface that "It was written originally as a secondary source document, a hard-core Christian analysis of Marx's thought. It is more likely to serve in the future as a primary source document." He later notes that "By the age of 24, my basic world-and-life view was set in concrete." (Pg. lx)

North states that his thesis for the book is that "Marx's concept of human alienation was used by him as a substitute for the Christian doctrine of the fall of man." (Pg. 39) He points out that prior to 1917, Marx had very little influence, especially in the United States. (Pg. xxxi)

North states that the primary message of Marxism, the "very heart of Marx's religion of revolution," is the assertion that the proletarian revolution will regenerate mankind by regenerating man's economic and social conditions. (Pg. xvii) He also points out that Marx's labor theory of value "is unable to account for prices or values in terms of human labor." (Pg. 119)

North's characteristic acerbic observations are present in abundance; e.g., Marx's writing style is "best described as Germanic verbal constipation coupled with a bad case of hemorrhoids." (Pg. xlii) For North, Marx "was no starving proletarian. By anyone's standards in 1844, he was a rich man." (Pg.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By spfdgreg on April 2, 2011
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This may well be the best critique of Marxism ever written from a conservative Protestant perspective. Dr North demonstrates beyond doubt that Christianity and Marxism are not compatible.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By scholarsearch on August 24, 2010
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Should be required reading for young people, but that will never happen in the Socialist/Communist public schools. Do yourself a favor and read this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James E. Campbell on March 19, 2014
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For those enamored with Marx, this book could represent a good dose of reality. Don't look for typical academic prose and drudgery. This book pulls no punches either against Marx or against the academic wannabes who continue to promote his insanity.
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