Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy New
$21.75
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.95
  • Save: $5.20 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Mass Incarceration on Tri... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Mass Incarceration on Trial: A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America Hardcover – August 5, 2014

4.7 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$21.75
$11.98 $9.95

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
$21.75 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Mass Incarceration on Trial: A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America
  • +
  • The New Jim Crow:  Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Total price: $34.71
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Mass Incarceration on Trial:
"Highly readable, stunning stuff. California is at the epicenter of a new American debate about prison policy and Simon’s remarkable book places the state's travails in national and historical context. I recommend it to anyone interested in the problem of prisons in America."
—Todd Clear, author of The Punishment Imperative

"A masterful job of assessing the qualitative shift in the court's analysis on human rights concerns as they apply to our notorious prison system, the book points the way to a legal strategy premised on human dignity as a means of challenging mass incarceration."
—Marc Mauer, executive director, The Sentencing Project, and author of Race to Incarcerate

"A powerful critique of California's use of mass incarceration combined with an inspiring vision of a hopeful future created by landmark court decisions."
—Jules Lobel, president, Center for Constitutional Rights

Praise for Jonathan Simon:
"[Jonathan Simon is] one of the outstanding criminologists of his generation."
—Nikolas Rose, London School of Economics

Praise for Governing Through Crime:
"Ambitious and carefully reasoned."
—Boston Review

"Every thoughtful citizen should confront the arguments that are so lucidly presented in this book. Highly recommended."
Choice

"In Governing through Crime, Jonathan Simon powerfully and persuasively argues that America's obsession with crime has touched, indeed distorted, the fundamental building blocks of our democratic society … This disturbing and provocative treatise should command the attention of scholars, opinion leaders, and policymakers who aspire to create a more tolerant and open future for this country."
—Jeremy Travis, president, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

"For historians, this book will one day be a valuable primary source."
Law and History Review

"An invaluable addition to the literature in critical criminology, this is a volume that ought to be read by anyone who seeks to understand the present and future of governance in the USA—and elsewhere."
—John Comaroff, Harold H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor, University of Chicago

"This is an impressive work. The book's great strength is its integration of a wide range of research on political science, law, and sociology, with journalistic accounts of current and recent politics … I know of no other work that so effectively uncovers ways that these issues are connected to a changing relationship between citizens and their government."
The Law and Politics Book Review

"His book stands out as the most important and most readable treatment to date on the overreach of crime and our emergence, in part, as a society gripped by the language of crime and the technologies of criminal justice."
Political Science Quarterly

About the Author

Jonathan Simon is the Adrian A. Kragen Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book, Governing through Crime, won the American Sociology Association’s 2008 Sociology of Law Distinguished Book Award and the 2010 Hindelang Prize of the American Society of Criminology. He lives in Berkeley, California.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: The New Press (August 5, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595587691
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595587695
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #503,218 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
89%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
11%
1 star
0%
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By mej on February 23, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is great for people who are new to ideas of mass incarceration, those who need convincing that locking people in cages is wrong, or those who just like a good flood leitmotif. However, this really fails to analyze the prison industrial complex or mass incarceration on a further level--one that would at least link, but preferably implicate, economic and political systems of oppression as well. The overall tone of someone who is shocked that prison conditions could be so horrid is borderline offensive, and the not-so-subtle implication that incarceration works but mass incarceration is where things get morally dicey is at best, a lazy viewpoint, and at worst, willful ignorance resulting from thinking steeped in white neoliberal politics.

But I mean, it gets points for being a relatively easy read.
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Jonathan Simon offers his readers a look at our criminal justice system and provides an intellectual examination of its flaws. Professor Simon, one of our leading legal minds, approaches our corrections state by state, including our federal system, as a citizen and causes us to consider what we are getting for the billions of dollars spent each year to keep millions of people caged. He suggests many, if not most, of those people pose no threat to society or themselves, but warehoused in prisons because we are mad at them and because we don't know what an acceptable alternative might be. For anyone concerned about the direction our social consciousness is heading, this book is a must read and should be read again.
Ralph Spinelli
author of Prison as Punishment
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Professor Simon's "Mass Incarceration on Trial" is a wonderfully written piece that covers a plurality of important social issues by examining America's prison system, with California's prison system at the epicenter of it all. A series of landmark cases have signaled a change in prison policies, and perhaps more generally, a change in our idea of human rights and dignity. All in all, a clearly written piece that is open to all audiences, and well worth the read.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book, among several others, represents a new awareness similar to the one which started the civil rights movement about whether we are, or should be, our brothers' keeper.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
America worries about its citizens. America wants to reduce crime, separating those who have comitted crime from those who are victims or can become victims. The method of the separation the US have chosen is imprisonment everyone who poses even a slightest threat to society.

Mass incarceration has become panacea for all crime related illnesses in America. Prisons lose their rehabilitation status, turning into human warehouses storing people as objects that have lost all their value for the government.

Jonathan Simon in his study of mass incarceration writes that the society and then government views on crime and crime prevention toward incapacitation changed their views on prisons significantly only recently. On an example of California, Simon shows how a state with moderately small amount of prisons during only two decades had made a big step forward to a prison state, where “more than twenty new prisons [were built] during 1980s and 1990s”. The state abandoned all rehabilitation programs for prisoners, adapted new harsh sentensing laws, made parole impossible, with the only solution in mind – incarceration. The newly builded prisons couldn’t catch up with the number of newly convicted, who received long sentences even for smaller crimes. It had led to overcrowding in prisons, that itself had become the source of another issue for prison inmates. The conditions of their imprisonment worsened. While the official theory was that prisons are safe for those who are unsafe to society, in real life prisoners suffered from absence of elemental medical treatment. The prisons became places of torture tucked away from our eyes.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Mass Incarceration on Trial: A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Mass Incarceration on Trial: A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America