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Mastering Digital Printing (Miscellaneous) Paperback – December 2, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-1929685653 ISBN-10: 1929685653 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Miscellaneous
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Course Technology PTR; 001 edition (December 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1929685653
  • ISBN-13: 978-1929685653
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 7.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,393,134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...It's a printing classic in the world of digital arts.... Truly a great road map towards digital printing." -- InsideGraphics.com

"...a complete reference book of digital printing for photography and fine art." -- Art World News, March 2003

"Photographers, digital and traditional artists, and printmakers can gain a thorough introduction to digital printmaking in "Mastering Digital Printing." -- The Big Picture Magazine, Nov/Dec. 2002

"The new bible for digital printmakers!" -- WorldPrintmakers.com

"There's really nothing like this book. It's comprehensive, but it's readable without getting clammy." -- Imaging Resource Digital Photography Newsletter, Feb. 21, 2003

About the Author

Harald Johnson is the creator and moderator of Yahoo's digital-fineart, the world's largest online discussion group on the subject of digital fine art. He has worked with the Walker Art Institute, Acquavella Gallery, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and is the founding chairman of the Digital Art Practices and Terminology Task Force. He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Customer Reviews

Very well written with excellent illustrations.
Joe Mischka
Harald Johnson explains the complexity of digital printing in a way novices like me can increase their knowledge from an easy-to-read book.
A. Rasmussen
I don't care how much you think you know, you will learn from this book.
Glenn Denshaw

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

139 of 146 people found the following review helpful By S. Friedman on January 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
Anyone who has ventured seriously into creating digital art sooner or later stumbles into the uncharted sea of printing. Once an artist has finally created his or her masterpiece on the computer, they must contend with a vast array of new printing technologies, image management software (sometimes called RIP), and different ink types and substrates to produce their final print. Until now that process has remained a complete mystery to all but a few. But at last Harald Johnson has come forward with his new book Mastering Digital Printing to explain the process from the basics to the complex.
Perhaps what I like most about the book is that is not just a technical manual, but really goes a long way into addressing head on some of the issues that are raging in the art world today regarding digital artwork. Things like what the difference is between a digital reproduction and digital original, and what a Giclee print is. These topics really shed some light onto some controversial and often overlooked issues.
On the technical side he does a very deft job of delicately explaining complex terms such as printer resolution, dpi, and lpi so that even a beginner can start to get an adequate grasp of the subject. This is a book aimed at artists, not propeller heads. And while his coverage of the different printing technologies may be a bit more information than most artists want, it is never the less important when one is considering [purchasing]a print based on those technologies. He also does an outstanding job of explaining scanning and what artists really need to know about sending out work to be scanned, or scanning it themselves.
Finally he addresses two important issues for the professional artist, permanence and substrates.
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128 of 136 people found the following review helpful By miguel@worldprintmakers.com on January 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
A Virtual Milestone
Harald Johnson's new book, Mastering Digital Printing: The Photographer's and Artist's Guide to High-Quality Digital Output (Muska & Lipman, December 2002) seems to me something of a milestone, not only for its prodigious content, but for its very concept. For Johnson has not only written the Bible of digital printing for fine-art printmakers and photographers, but he has also solved the abiding problem of people who write books on technical subjects: currency. Technology changes fast and books on technological subjects go stale just as rapidly. So Johnson has provided his readers/practitioners with the added support of both a website ([...]) and a lively online discussion group ([...]) which he created a couple of years ago and conscientiously moderates.
Into the Fourth Dimension
These online resources constantly lever the power and actuality of the book, providing instant access to current information on the ever-changing state of the art. More than a simple book, what Johnson has created is a "metabook" which extends its domain into the fourth dimension: time. This is a prodigious achievement for one man working on his own, one for which Johnson-the Prometheus of digital printing-is to be admired and congratulated.
Have I made the book sound stuffy? Far from it! Mastering Digital Printing is written in a personal conversational style which is more like a chat with a friendly expert than a technical manual. It is wide ranging both in breadth and depth, of interest both to beginners and experts.
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47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Harold Davis on April 19, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This handsome volume badly disappointed me. I think the proper rating for the book is about one and a half stars, but I gave it two out of generosity.

If you don't have a printer and are looking to buy one, it gives a pretty good round-up of the choices, technologies, and papers. The problem with this kind of thing, of course, is that it is necessarily dated--so it can't really serve as a buyer's guide.

If you already have a printer--I have an Epson 4800--and a source of digital images, you won't find much information here about how to make great prints. The only section on the actual print making process shows the dialogs for one printer, probably the author's. Totally unhelpful unless you have that printer (and you've probably already figured out how those dialogs work if you have that printer).

The section on RIP software is way overview, and doesn't provide any decent guidance on how to proceed with it.

I'm not given to writing negative reviews, and I don't often return books (as I am with this one), but in the face of all the positive feedback for this book I feel compelled to provide my opinion. As I said, if you are looking to buy a printer, this might help you understand the basic technology issues (although the models have changed since the book was written). Otherwise, the only use I see for it is as a "gee whiz" coffee table book for would-be digital printers rather than a serious reference manual.
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141 of 165 people found the following review helpful By Jason White on March 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
I've scanned through most of the past Amazon reviews of this book and I find it surprising at how different my opinion is. I have in fact read the whole book cover to cover and I own a $1000 digital camera and a $200 inkjet printer and I have as a hobbyist done a tremedous amount of printing using this type of middle class printing. So I thought a book on the subject would help fill in some holes in my knowledge. In a nutshell my problem with this book is that it is without a doubt not meant for someone like me using this "middle class" tools. I found the book incredibly elitist, the only thing I really learned was I must buy more & better equipment to be a real artist - what I have isn't good enough apparently. For example apparently you need at least 8 megapixels to print an 8x10? My other main issue is that after having read the entire book, when I go to print an image nothing has changed at all - I still do everything exactly the same simply because none of the information in the book applied to me unless I buy thousands of dollars to hundreds of thousands dollars worth of additional gear - and in general there was no info on how to use this gear specifically either - just you should have it. I've read an enormous amount of technical books over the years and on average most are great in that they strive to empower the reader with the skills and knowledge to achieve better things - but this book seems to achieve the reverse - unempowering the reader with lists and graphs and photos of things you can't ever possibly obtain. It's quite unique.

So honestly if you're a regular human being who has a camera and printer then this book is really not intended for you.
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