Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $4.37 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Bombay Duck
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: WITHDRAWN EX-LIBRARY COPY with usual markings and stickers. Book itself is in GREAT condition. Cover is in good condition with slight normal wear. EX-LIBRARY.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Masterpiece Comics Hardcover – September 1, 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, September 1, 2009
"Please retry"
$15.58
$8.95 $3.88
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

  • Get a $100 Amazon.com Gift Card: Get the Discover it card and get a $100.00 Amazon.com Gift Card* after your first purchase within 3 months. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Masterpiece Comics + Shortcomings + Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art
Price for all three: $38.53

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Drawn and Quarterly (September 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1897299842
  • ISBN-13: 978-1897299845
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 0.6 x 12.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #396,999 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. This slim but densely sly volume collects, at long last, 20 years of Sikoryak's classic lit/classic comics mashups. Blondie and Dagwood act out Genesis in Blonde Eve; Garfield tempts Jon into a deal with the devil in Mephistofield; and Batman turns into Raskol for a reworking of Crime and Punishment. What could be simple parody in other hands is elevated to multileveled artistry by Sikoryak's uncanny ability to mimic the line of artists from Winsor McCay through Jack Davis to Charles Schulz. He goes far beyond mere imitation to eerily inhabit the artistic sensibilities of a dozen cartoonists; the result is as funny as it is impressive. These retellings linger on the philosophical underpinnings of such tales; coupled with the allusions and baggage of these familiar cartoon characters, the crossovers take on a life of their own to become legitimate adaptations. For instance, Little Pearl in Red Letter Day features Marjorie Henderson Buell/John Stanley's Little Lulu characters in a note for note retelling of Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, contrasting the grim Puritan narrative with the animated expressions of the Bueel/Stanley originals to cast the sin-obsessed settlers into even sharper relief. Readers who pick this up for the well-deserved laughter will get a bonus with the thoughtful metaphors. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Grade 11 Up–The practice of retelling classic literature in comic-book form gets turned on its head in this entertaining mash-up. With a varied compilation featuring Blondie and Dagwood newly created and naked in the Garden of Eden, or a typically wry Garfield in the role of Mephistopheles, Sikoryak successfully merges the main themes and plot points with the artistic components unique to the individual comics. For instance, old school Superman's square jaw perfectly conveys The Stranger's nihilistic detachment, presented by the covers of Action Camus instead of Action Comics. Though each story's impact depends on readers' frame of reference with the material (teens might readily recognize the Macbeth plot but not the Mary Worth comic strip), the book provides a good entry point for discussing satire. Added details like Letters to the Editor, a drawing contest, and advertisements for a toy model of the Pequod complete the package, ensuring more than a few chuckles.–Joanna K. Fabicon, Los Angeles Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Customer Reviews

A great mash-up of the comic medium and classic literature.
Adam C. Carrillo
Despite these reservations, I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes the concept - it is very entertaining, and really has to be seen to be believed.
Aaron McPherson
I liked every one of them, but my favorite was the one page "Waiting for Godot."
Richard A. Nathan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Roochak on September 2, 2009
R. Sikoryak is so good an artist, it's frightening, but now he's my new hero. Comic book parodies of literary classics are nothing new, but no one has ever made the source and its comic variation cut as deeply into each other as Sikoryak does in his graphic re-imagining of the Western canon. Perhaps the creative fuse that lead to this collection was lit in response to Harold Bloom, who credited the creation of modern self-consciousness to the shock effect that works of literary genius, particularly Shakespeare, have had upon our concept of ourselves. Or it could just be that Sikoryak finds it funny as hell that Dante's moralistic allegory of the wages of sin works just fine when condensed to the size of a bubblegum wrapper.

That's only one of the formal strategies on display in this collection. Sikoryak, clearly a man who enjoys a challenge, not only finds astonishing parallels between characters from highbrow literature and pop culture, but he paintstakingly draws each cartoon parody in a line-perfect recreation of the original's style, right down to the flat, four-color palette that comics were stuck with in the pre-computer era. It's a virtuoso performance.

Nothing will give you a better idea of what Sikoryak is up to than the table of contents:

"Blonde Eve" -- Mr. Dithers creates the world and appoints Dagwood and Blondie caretakers of the Garden of Eden. Things don't go very well.

"Inferno Joe" -- Bazooka Joe tours the nine circles of Hell in thirty-one bubblegum-wrapper-sized panels.

"Mephistofield" -- Jon Faustus makes a deal with the devil to become lord of all the Earth. His constant companion is a fat, lazy, unflappable feline demon who's clearly the brains of the operation.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. Hyman VINE VOICE on September 10, 2009
Verified Purchase
What a great mix of two wonderful genres: comic books and classics. The author maintains and merges both forms with equal veracity. I have been laughing on every page, whether Dagwood and Blondie as Adam and Eve, or the Tales of the Crypt version of Wuthering Heights.

Marvelous fun.

The book also includes all of the wonderful back of comic ads that enhance comic book experience, tying them into the stories told within.

A lovely find
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chuck Furnace on September 21, 2009
Verified Purchase
great idea well executed, using the style and characters of various cartoon and comic books and strips, the artists reveals the underlying archetypes that link great literature and great comics. The "Good Grief" of Charlie Brown echoes Kafka's Human Cockroach Gregor in railing against an unfair world, Dostoevsky and Batman collide over the concepts of Crime and Punishment, and the true meaning of Gothic is highlighted when Jane Austin gets the EC Horror treatment. Highly recommended
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chris Ward VINE VOICE on October 10, 2009
Verified Purchase
Good God, this is funny stuff. Remember when MAD magazine was really funny, about 55 years ago? (No? Go look up the first four years' worth, you'll see what I mean.) The MAD comics satires were perfectly done, and Sikoryak's book is like a whole smorgasbord of the best of those days. A mix of Dada, deadpan satire, and savage parody for English majors, it really hits the old spot. The idea-- classic lit rendered as classic comics-- would flop if it weren't rendered with a fidelity to/love of the originals. Sikoryak gets it just right. It's laugh-out-loud funny, and wickedly caustic stuff.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Goodman on September 4, 2009
Verified Purchase
I have been waiting for this book a long time. I'm glad that someone has finally collected the bulk of Mr. Sikoryak's work in one place and under one cover. This is the way the 'Classics' should always be portrayed in comics versus those dense and dullish Classics Illustrated I and others grew up with. I love good parody and this book has it in spades. I'm nuts about the story of Adam and Eve done with the characters from Blondie, and that Wuthering Heights ala EC Comics is pure GENIUS. Thank you D&Q for making this tome available and I hope there is more of this in the future from the great Mr. S. This may be my favorite comic book related title of the year because it's like a dream come true. And as a bonus it a very large book so all the art can be experienced in bold glory. Wish I could give it 6 stars!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By shaxper on August 16, 2010
I picked up Masterpiece Comics for the same reason that I expect most people do -- it looks like a series of fun spoofs of classic literature. Thus, when I approached this volume, my only lingering question was how funny it was going to be. I certainly didn't expect a loving, easily digestible dose of art and critical theory along with it.

Here's the thing. Masterpiece Comics never takes the cheap shot or the easy way out. While it's often laugh-out-loud funny, that doesn't seem to be creator R. Sikoryak's only goal. He never compromises the integrity of his vision for a laugh, and his vision seems to be a serious and lovingly executed marriage of classic literature pieces with comics and comic books that share their themes. Thus, while pairing the visuals and style of Jim Davis' "Garfield" with Christopher Marlowe's "Tragedy of Dr. Faustus" is outrageously funny, Sikoryak never lets on that he's laughing. He never does anything out of character for either work, simply allowing the marriage to run its course and reveal truths about both works in contrast to one another.

This elevates the volume into being so much more than satire and spoof. It's a thoughtful pairing of unalike works of art (literature and comic), helping us to understand both a little better as a result. Thus, while I felt that this volume helped me to see Bronte and Voltaire in a different light, I was amazed to realize even more about Beavis and Butthead in contrast. This is so much more than comedy; it's painstakingly executed, brilliant, and easily/enjoyably digestible literary criticism. I read this entire volume in one sitting because I simply couldn't put it down. I rarely feel that way about any work, classic or otherwise.

In the end, this volume is an absolute winner.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?