Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tobe Hooper's Danse Macabre
Fans of SF or horror who can wrap their heads around stories (and the films based on them) like Orwell's 1984 and Burgess' A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, who understand that such stories are meant as cautionary comments on contemporary society more than they are predictions, will appreciate Tobe Hooper's nihilistic "Dance of the Dead," the auteur's first-season entry for Showtime's...
Published on December 20, 2006 by Michael R Gates

versus
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Less would be more for this Matheson-Hooper-Englund outing for Showtime
I totally agree. You take a story by Richard Matheson, get Tobe Hooper to direct it and give Robert Englund a choice role and you would think this outing of Showtime's "Masters of Horror" would be a real treat. Instead the result is quite disappointing and I would argue that the reason is an ironic little case of history repeating itself (insert "Twilight Zone" music...
Published on April 13, 2007 by Lawrance M. Bernabo


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Less would be more for this Matheson-Hooper-Englund outing for Showtime, April 13, 2007
By 
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
I totally agree. You take a story by Richard Matheson, get Tobe Hooper to direct it and give Robert Englund a choice role and you would think this outing of Showtime's "Masters of Horror" would be a real treat. Instead the result is quite disappointing and I would argue that the reason is an ironic little case of history repeating itself (insert "Twilight Zone" music here). The good news is that the special features on this DVD take away some of the sting of the experience of watching "Dance of the Dead."

Set in a dystopian future that is right around the bend, "Dance of the Dead" is about a world where something has happened and now toxic residue falls from the sky. The specifics on the war or terrorist attack are unclear, as are what exactly happens to people when they stuff falls on them, but America is clearly in a death spiral. Meanwhile, poor sweet young Peggy (Jessica Lowndes) is bored with her mundane (but safe) existence working at her mom's roadside cafe. When good looking Jak (Jonathan) and his obnoxious partner Boxx (Ryan McDonald) blow through town, she decides to take off with them and see what life is like in the big bad world out there. Of course she finds out more about death. The two guys are blood merchants, and then take Peggy to the Doom Room, where they sell plasma to the M.C. (Englund), who uses it as part of a secret Army recipe for this special juice that reanimates the newly dead for a short period of time. The Army used it to get more from soldiers on the battlefield, while the M.C. uses it to reanimate female cadavers. Use cattle prods to shock them, and you have the dead dancing for the entertainment of the wretched audience that comes to the Doom Room.

Now, in addition to turning his novel "The Incredible Shrinking Man" into the movie of the same name and "I Am Legend" into "The Last Man of Earth," Richard Matheson also did the scripts for Roger Corman's adaptations of the works of Edgar Allan Poe, most notably "House of Usher" and "The Pit and the Pendulum." For television Matheson did scripts for "Star Trek" ("The Enemy Within") and Steven Spielberg's debut effort, "Duel." But if you talk about Matheson's work on television then first and foremost you need to talk about what he did for "The Twilight Zone," where we wrote 16 scripts including the classic episodes "Nick of Time," "The Invaders," and "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet." It was when I thought about Matheson's great work on the "Zone" that it dawned on me what was wrong with this story.

After three successful seasons of "The Twilight Zone," the network executives decided that the show could be even more successful if it was twice as long, so for the fourth season episodes of the "Zone" were an hour long instead of a half-hour. Overall, the resulting episodes were big disappointments, and Rod Serling' show went back to the half-hour format for its fifth and final season. When I finished watching "Dance of the Dead" I realized the problem was that the story was twice as long as it should be. Take the first ten minutes and the last twenty minutes and the story works a lot better than it does in this bloated format. Now, it would be easy to point the finger at Richard Christian Matheson, who did the screenplay adapting his father's short story, but I think this one was doomed as soon as it was green lighted for the hour-long "Masters of Horror" format. Strip down the story as I suggest and you have the makings of a classic episode of "The Twilight Zone." The twist at the end is set up at the very beginning and by the time we get to the payoff you have probably forgotten it because the focus has become all about Jak showing Peggy the underside of the rock the world has become.

Several of the special features warn you that watching them before you watch "Dance of the Dead" will spoil the feature, which I find rather ironic. There are commentary tracks by both director Tobe Hooper and screenwriter Richard Christian Matheson." I especially liked the "Working With a Master: Tobe Hooper" featurette with its walk down memory lane, which goes along with his "Primal Screams" interview. Richard Matheson is also the subject of an interview, as are Englund, Lowndes and Tucker, all "On Set." Then you can throw in your basic behind the scenes/making of featurette, still gallery, storyboard gallery, Tobe Hooper bio, and some trailers (mostly Horrorfest stuff). In DVD-Rom mode you get the screenplay and a screensaver. Like I said, the extras here are pretty solid and I am tempted to round up on the rating because of them, but "Dance of the Dead" itself is just too disappointing given our high expectations and the rating needs to reflect that sorry fact. Check it out, but have no illusions about what you will see.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tobe Hooper's Danse Macabre, December 20, 2006
By 
Michael R Gates (Nampa, ID United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
Fans of SF or horror who can wrap their heads around stories (and the films based on them) like Orwell's 1984 and Burgess' A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, who understand that such stories are meant as cautionary comments on contemporary society more than they are predictions, will appreciate Tobe Hooper's nihilistic "Dance of the Dead," the auteur's first-season entry for Showtime's MASTERS OF HORROR series. Hooper updates those classic cautionary tales to give the world a fresh glimpse into the post-apocalyptic future, this time through a computer-age lens tinted with goth and punk sensibilities.

Hooper's tight and visionary direction is supported by the outstanding cast and crew. Portraying Peggy, the audience's window into the grim future, beautiful Jessica Lowndes exudes unvitiated innocence as her character's eyes are newly opened to the reality of her world. Actor Jonathan Tucker is perfect as Jak, a brooding, introspective black-marketeer who struggles with guilt over the questionable ethics of his vocation. And horror icon Robert Englund's delightfully over-the-top performance as a grizzled, cynical nightclub MC--a sort of post-apocalyptic re-interpretation of Joel Grey's performance in CABARET (1972)--is itself worth the price of Anchor Bay's DVD. The script by Richard Christian Matheson, based on a short story by his famous father, is a literate, frighteningly nihilistic speculation on the post-nine-eleven possibilities that threaten our world. And the frenetic, multi-layered cinematography of Jon Joffin (enhanced by Andrew Cohen's the top-notch editing) perfectly complements the horrific, chaotic atmosphere and lifestyle of the potential future Hooper here depicts.

Any moviegoer who comprehends and enjoys SF-based horror will certainly come away satisfied after watching "Dance of the Dead." While not necessarily the best entry from the first season of MASTERS OF HORROR, it is a great mini-movie nonetheless, and it proves that director Tobe Hooper is, indeed, a master of the genre.

The excellent DVD from Anchor Bay is well worth the price of admission. It offers a pristine digital anamorphic transfer of the flick in its original aspect ratio of 1.77:1. In addition, there are over three hours of cool extras, including two commentary tracks (one featuring director Hooper and one with scripter Matheson), interviews with Tobe Hooper and the main actors, a behind-the-scenes featurette, and more! A fine addition to the film collection of any SF or horror fan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, October 30, 2006
By 
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
Wow, I'm surprised by the reviews. I loved it. I taped it off Showtime, but I'm buying the DVD (and I don't buy movies often). I thought it was the Best Master of Horror I've seen. I liked how the gore was less and the premise was actually realistic, unlike other movies in the genre. The chemistry between Jak and Peggy was felt through the screen and believable. Their romance was a saviour for both of them in an otherwise horrific world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finally, a good one!, July 20, 2007
By 
David Bonesteel (Fresno, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
In the aftermath of an undisclosed conflict that has left a deadly residue in the atmosphere, the US is clearly slipping into chaos with a few pockets of normality holding out against the anarchy. Bored with her quiet existence working as a waitress in her mother's café and haunted by visions of the deaths of many of her friends at a childhood birthday party, Peggy (Jessica Lowndes) decides to accompany some shady "plasma dealers" (Jonathan Tucker and Ryan McDonald) into the big city to find out what happens in a club called the Doom Room and just what all that plasma is needed for. This little film develops real atmosphere and doesn't explain everything neatly. Rather, it allows ambiguous details to accumulate until we have a rather clear picture of what is happening by the end, a final reveal that is more shocking for what is says about human nature than the actual details and visuals of the event.

At last! After struggling through three sub par entries in the "Masters of Horror" series, we come to a good one. Unlike some other participants in the show, Tobe Hooper (he of the original "Texas Chainsaw Massacre") qualifies as a true master of horror, as does Richard Matheson, whose short story provided the inspiration for the story. I'm surprised that this episode has been rated so poorly in relation to many others, since I feel that it is a real gem.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best MoH episodes in the series!, October 23, 2006
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
Am I the only one that liked this movie? Gosh, it seems like it, judging from all the negative reviews on this page. Anyway, I thought this movie was great, with a capital G! So great in fact that when it first aired on Showtime, I caught it on 3 separate airings and since buying the DVD earlier this week, I've watched it twice already, and then caught it again when it aired one last time on Showtime! How can this not be a stellar short film? Definitely one of the best in the series to date. Great storyline, great accompanying music, and excellently cast(hello! Robert Englund!), with newcomer Jessica Lowndes giving a stunning performance as the young, naive Peggy, and Jonathan Tucker in a far cry from his other roles as the bad boy you can't help but love, Jak. All in all, an excellent "Masters" film, and one of the best Tobe Hooper movies to date!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dance of the Dead, October 27, 2006
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
I do not care what anyone else thought, I really enjoyed this episode. it was disturbing and gross and strangely romantic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Episode (info on the band in the Doom Room found at bottom*), December 27, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
Ok, this is my all-time favorite episode of Masters of Horror. Classic plot of good girl meets a bad boy and they fall for eachother...but with a horror twist and without all the lovey-dovey crap. I would also compare this episode to the movie "Moulin Rouge" due to the whole club scene. The story takes place in a post-apocolyptic world where criminals roam free among the streets.

This whole episode has a music video style of editing with alot of quick cuts and special effects that are out of this world. I congradulate Tobe Hooper for giving us this dark and twisted tale. The acting is brilliant, and there is nothing negative about this episode...except that there is no sequel.

**Because I had trouble identifying the songs performed by the band in The Doom Room, I'm gonna save you the trouble of trying to search continually for months like I did. The band is called DECREE and the 2 songs they perform in The Doom Room are "Fateless" and "Violent Reckoning". DECREE also performs the song playing where bodies are being burned in a dumpster, this song is called "Fire of Judgement".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OBSCENE OR SCIENCE? POETRY OR PORNOGRAPHY?, October 24, 2011
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
In the post apocalyptic world, youth become malcontents and spend their time at an underground club, The Doom Room run by Robert Englund. The malcontents make money by involuntarily taking blood from people and selling it to Englund. Jessica Lowndes plays the young virginal waitress who has been able to live a sheltered life away from all of the obscenity of the world. Of course Jessica, in her teen curiosity hooks up with some malcontents and gets taken to the perverse Doom Room whose claim to fame is....

Great movie for horror/zombie fans. Cult classic.

F-bomb, nudity (not Jessica), sex.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A strange Sci-fi horror fable from Tobe Hooper!, May 8, 2007
By 
John Lindsey "John" (Socorro, New Mexico USA.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
In the future after a nuclear holocaust has changed the world, teen girl Peggy (Jessica Lowdnes) had a troubled childhood of seeing some of her former friends burn in the holocaust. At an underground night club called "The Doom Room", a sinster MC (Robert Englund) creates unusual but popular stage shows for the sick and twisted out there for only Peggy and her friends must find the shocking truth.

Bizarre and unusual sci-fi horror story written by Richard Matheson (writer of "Stir of Echoes", "Duel" and "I am Legend") and directed by Tobe Hooper ("The original Texas Chainsaw Massacre", "Poltergeist", "Lifeforce", "Salem's Lot"). Robert Englund whom you all know as Freddy Krueger from the Elm Street movies steals the show as MC with his character and the film does have a modern futuristic MTV feel to it but there's some interesting ideas in this story that mixes sci-fi with horror.

The DVD contains lots of goodies like interviews with the cast and filmmakers, two audio commentarires, still gallery, storyboard gallery, Tobe Hooper Bio, DVD-Rom material, and Behind The Scenes featurette.

Also recommended: "Battle Royale", "Fist of the North Star (Anime)", "28 Days Later...", "Mad Max Trilogy", "Akira", "Rats: The Nights of Terror", "The Running Man", "Starship Troopers", "Day of the Dead", "Terminator Trilogy", and "A Clockwork Orange".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Most like an Outer Limits episode, May 14, 2007
This review is from: Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead (DVD)
Not that that is a bad thing. This one is more a twist film than a horror. Sci fi twist. Like Outer Limits.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead
Masters of Horror: Dance of the Dead by Tobe Hooper (DVD - 2006)
$14.98 $4.73
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.