Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Material Culture and Mass Consumption [Paperback]

Daniel Miller
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)


Available from these sellers.


Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover $40.47  
Paperback --  

Book Description

March 1991 063118001X 978-0631180012
Drawing on a range of examples from Western and developing cultures, this book offers a re-reading of the contemporary society as the product of both individual and collective identity and behaviour. Marxist interpretations of the expansion in the range and number of material goods have tended to view people as estranged from the objects they produce, while massive consumption reinforces the fragmented and individualistic nature of capitalism. In this book, the author develops a more positive theory of material culture, revealing the creative potential in the relationship between people and goods. He argues that rather than being oppressed by them, people redefine material objects to make them express themselves and their cultures. He shows that everyday objects reflect not only personal tastes and attributes, but also moral principles and social ideals.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Blackwell Pub (March 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 063118001X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0631180012
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,582,456 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
(1)
4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Objectification July 2, 2001
Format:Hardcover
Provides a historical overview of "objectification" (from Hegel to Marx to Lukacs to Simmel) or what will be called "alienation" in Marxian terms. The user/ consumer is not fixed in consuming in the mode as intended by production; through an undersatnding of "objectification" the consumer begins to engage in a process whereby consumption produces an alt-identity that has the potential to escape the hegemony of dominant systems. With the introduction of this perspective the (general) negativity towards capitalist modes of production and consumption is subverted. In a weird way the supposed determinist track of "objectification" in this book subverts itself by proclaiming its own provisional status.
The next thing to read from this text will be Spivak and Bhabha.
Miller talks about the person as 'being-with-the-world', hence refusing the separation drawn between self and world and nature.
The only thing that concerns me is that it might be only through alienation/ or negative dialectics that objectification and hence a more rounded understanding of self and world that consist the 'being-with-the-world' can be achieved, which does not differ too much from Adorno's "elitism".
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category