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75 of 78 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Actual REVIEW....
The audio of the McCartney reissue is more than I expected. This was essentially a home recording Paul made in the wake of the Beatles' break up - it just hadn't been announced yet. This remaster has wonderful dynamics compared to the original CD issue, and the 1993 remaster. The drums sound like they're in your room (first snare pop of "Every Night" floored me), the bass...
Published on June 15, 2011 by sirguitarist

versus
29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Second Consecutive Disappointment From Paul's New Label
From the outset I'd like to say, emphatically, that my problem is not with the contents of this album. It not only contains some very interesting McCartney music, it conjures memories of a very exciting time as a young Beatle fan: the anticipation of a solo album by one of the two main songwriting Beatles. Enough said on that.

While the CD counterpart of this...
Published on July 13, 2011 by DKPete


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75 of 78 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Actual REVIEW...., June 15, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The audio of the McCartney reissue is more than I expected. This was essentially a home recording Paul made in the wake of the Beatles' break up - it just hadn't been announced yet. This remaster has wonderful dynamics compared to the original CD issue, and the 1993 remaster. The drums sound like they're in your room (first snare pop of "Every Night" floored me), the bass is strong but not exaggerated, the acoustic guitars are crisp (never enjoyed "The Lovely Linda" as much as this)

The bonus audio disc is rather short - but I'm glad it's on a separate disc, as the material is not up to the standards of the released album (as is usually the case with bonus tracks) The track that stood out for me was the in-progress backing tracks for "Oo You." The demo version of "Suicide" is only interesting because you can hear it in the context of the ending of "Glasses" from the released album. The bonus audio disc is the weakest part of the set, but still of interest to a McCartney fan (which I am.)

The DVD starts off with the EPK being shown on McCartney's site, and has several interesting "McCartney" album-related performances, most notably 2 performances from the 1979 line-up of Wings. Add in 2 more from MTV Unplugged (remember when MTV had music?) and it's a nice touch. The performance of "Suicide" leaves one wondering why it wasn't used instead of the demo on the bonus audio disc.

All I can say about the book is, THIS is what the extra money is for. Good quality, tons of pictures, very nicely done. A "coffee table" book just like this would easily sell for $30-$40. These issues are for the true fans, not the casual ones, and with that said - if you are fan, you will love this and it is a great value, considering you also get a digital 24 Bit download (and YES the CODES work) via Topspin with an included card. If you are a casual listener, stick with the basic version. As for me, it's all I could have wanted in a deluxe treatment of one of my favorite albums.
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51 of 54 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars McCartney Debut, November 27, 2000
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
When Paul McCartney released his first solo album and the first true solo studio album by a Beatle in 1970, it was almost universally panned. While it certainly doesn't matchup with any of the Beatles albums, it has aged better than alot of the music of the time. Mr. McCartney recorded the album at his farm and its greatest asset is the simple, down-home feel that permeates it. You can almost picture the newly married and new father just tooling around the house and living the country life and whenever the mood struck him, laying down a new track. He plays all the instruments and other than some backing vocals by Linda, sings all the songs. There are several instrumentals on the album and a couple of songs like "Man We Was Lonely" that are basically just a couple of lines sung over and over, but "Maybe I'm Amazed" is a true gem. The song ranks up there with anything he's done in his solo career and a wouldn't be slighted by songs in the Beatles catalog. Other standout tracks include the sweet "Every Night", "Singalong Junk" & "That Would Be Something".
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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Do it yourself, June 14, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
There tend to be two prevailing views of this album, as there are with the Beatles album "Let it Be." One is that this is a bunch of amateurish noodlings done at home, with one or two good songs thrown in to give it credibility, and released out of sheer arrogance that everyone would want to hear it because it's by a famous person. The other view is that this is a classic album, displaying McCartney's viruosity as an all-around musician, as well as a funky kind of devil-may-care experimentation. In truth, there is validity to both points of view. Only two tracks are really polished or radio-ready: "Maybe I'm Amazed" and "Every Night." Then there are the Beatle leftovers, "Junk" and "Teddy Boy," which feature excellent melodies. Then there are weird one-offs like "Kreen Akrore" that aren't worth listening to every time. Yet the album does stand as an important testament to the man's mindset at this crucial pivot in his career, and in some ways it stands as a portrait of domestic bliss rather like Lennon's "Double Fantasy" did ten years later. If you are a Paul fan, you will love this album's intimacy.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Second Consecutive Disappointment From Paul's New Label, July 13, 2011
From the outset I'd like to say, emphatically, that my problem is not with the contents of this album. It not only contains some very interesting McCartney music, it conjures memories of a very exciting time as a young Beatle fan: the anticipation of a solo album by one of the two main songwriting Beatles. Enough said on that.

While the CD counterpart of this re-issue is quite good, this vinyl release-like it's predecessor, Band On The Run-is a major disappointment. As a remaster, there is barely any difference at all from the original vinyl release (my original copy happens to be in mint condition hence, I'm able to make a very fair comparison between the two).

The primary disappointment, however, is with the vinyl pressing itself. Here's one for the irony files: my original pressing has next to no pops and clicks whatsoever while this brand spanking new re-issue is full of them-as is my 180g of Band On The Run.

Now we get to the packaging; a very attractive cover package in and of itself but, unfortunately, not a very practical one. Again, as with BOTR, the paper grade utilized for the jacket is too thin to house a heavy vinyl, double album set.

Secondly, pulling the albums/inner sleeves out of the jacket is quite an ordeal; the fit is so tight that you have to endlessly rock the record back and forth in order to pull the thing out of the cover. Taking the record itself out of the sleeve is just as painful. Again, to due an overly tight fit, one ends up soiling the edges of the disc in the effort to take it out.

These are not minor complaints. They completely take away from the pleasure of the "vinyl experience". Perhaps the people over at Hear Music/Concord/Starbucks don't have too much knowledge or care on the subject. There are very specific reasons as to why some of us still love the vinyl medium. Thank goodness there are a handfull of classic album re-issue companies who, indeed, have an understanding of what it's "all about". Hear Music is very clearly not one of them.

Hopefully, Paul's current label will get enough complaints which will serve as incentive to improve their product. In past interviews, Paul has stated how, as a child, he used to save his pennies to buy a quality record by his favorite artists of the day.

Times haven't changed much, Paul. For those of us who have lived our lives through your music, it's just as important to purchase that quality record; and if you're a completist such as myself wanting all configurations available, it's just as hard saving those pennies. I hope SOMEONE is listening.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Laid Back, May 24, 2000
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
This album is so comforting. I don't know what's up with people who rate this album with 3 stars. The instrumentals are very good. The bass lines was very melodical. Very well played instruments. What struck me about this album what how it's feel and sound was very different than the Beatles. Do this: plug in the white album. And listen..... can't you feel the tension and the pain that is expressed through the music. And Abbey Road....you can still feel it. John's yokoish lyrics and music. McCartney is beatiful. It is so laid back, but not to laid back to filter out the quality of his music. Buy this album.
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39 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Of course he's no John Lennon...HE'S BETTER!, April 5, 2000
By 
Bret M. Herholz (Worcester, MA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
This is a McCartney solo album in every way. Not only did he write all the songs himself, but he also did every instrument on the album. This is probably still my favourite McCartney solo album just for the loving simplicity of the songs. Here is a man who has just found not only the love of his life and every single song on this album reflects that. Highlights on the album are "Every Night" (my favourite track), "OO You", "Momma Miss America", "Man We Was Lonely", "That Would Be Something" and "Maybe I'm Amazed". This is a terrific album from a man who embraces love songs that I feel are far from being "Silly". And I would take this album over "Imagine" anyday.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life begins after the Beatles, December 2, 2000
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
Of course, this album can't be compared to any of the Beatles' work, because you can't dismiss the Lennon, Harrison and Starr efforts. Of course, this album can't even be compared to "Ram" or "Band Of The Run", as examples of the greatest music Sir James Paul McCartney has ever done. But the listening experience you can live through "McCartney", the 1970 solo debut by Paul is really relaxing and fun, if you have the disposition to enjoy it and understand the context in which it was conceived, recorded and released. The man was tired of being a Beatle (I think everyone in the band was, look at "Plastic Ono Band" or "All Things Must Pass"), but when the group splitted up, he must have felt some isolation, he must have had a feeling of "what am I going to do now?, my life has completely changed, I've lost my friends, I don't even have a band...". He must have felt anxious and nervous, but "The Lovely Linda" was there. And she helped not only on the background harmonies and the photography for the album cover and inner pictures, but to focus Paul into taking care of his family and being the "man at home" that he wasn't during the Beatles period, as an attempt to give his life a complete and new sense. This album celebrates this spirit, as it was made mainly at home, by Paul recording all the instruments (yes, he played guitars, keyboards, bass, drums and percussion) and vocals, helped by Linda: because "if no-one wants to do it, you must do it yourself". "Maybe I'm Amazed" must be the best song Paul McCartney has ever recorded as a solo artist: its crying guitar solos (in this song and in "The End" on the "Abbey Road" Beatles album you can appreciate Paul as a great lead guitarist), and its painful piano parts make the perfect company for one of the best vocal performances Paul has ever made (maybe along with "Hey Jude") and the sincere and emotive lyrics of the man who is searching the meaning of his life and thinks he has found it in the love of his wife, although the inner contradictions are so strong that they can amaze and confuse him, making him act the wrong way... But this is the only "painful" one in the album, as the rest (with the exception made of "Kreen-Akrore", a track that I don't understand, and don't hear too much either) is a celebration to the peace of mind and fun that this home life can bring to Paul and Linda: "Every Night" (my personal favourite) is a joyful and simple anthem to the happiness that a good love can bring to your life; "Junk" (and "Singalong Junk", its paired instrumental) is a quite sad but good-arranged Beatle left-over, as is "Teddy Boy", and all of them, together with "The Lovely Linda" and the excellent and under-rated "Hot As Sun/Glasses" (the best instrumental by far) make the perfect acoustic/pop side to this album. You can also find rock: specially in the very good instrumentals "Valentine Day" and "Momma Miss America", the screaming "Oo You" and "That Would Be Something" (a track that even George Harrison liked...). I would reccomend this album mainly because you can note the spirit of peace-after-the-storm (or life after the Beatles) in which it was recorded, and you can illuminate your own life (no matter how old are you: I'm just 18 and it helped!) with the happiness it shows amongst almost all the tracks; and also, because it is a good way to appreciate Sir James Paul McCartney as an accomplished multi-instrumentist, as the bass & guitar lines, the keyboard parts and the drumming effects are amazing. (P.S.: I know this "homelife" spirit is also present in John & Yoko's "Double Fantasy", but what's the use of comparing John Lennon to Paul McCartney? They are both different musicians with different styles, and this variety within the unity was the very thing that gave the Beatles the tremendous musical spectrum they could reach through their music.)
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wow, It keeps getting better., January 28, 2000
By 
KEN MCCALLUM (Oakville,Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
I first picked this LP up back in 81 just after McCartney II came out and Columbia records reissued it on LP. I was not very impressed. I listed to it every now and then and found myself starting to like some of songs that at first I considered boring. I just replaced the Columbia LP due to the demise of my record player with the EMI CD and listened to it for the first time in years. Wow, what a great record, very personal, raw, and telling of the current state of mind that Paul was in. Perhaps John and George started their Post Beatle career with better releases, but any fan of the Beatles will see the quality of the songs and understand it in the context it should be taken in. Paul doing it all with some vocal help from Linda, having fun, and releasing a few songs that to this day hold up as well as any Beatle tunes.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Homegrown, June 14, 2001
By 
brad lonard (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: McCartney (Audio CD)
When McCartney appeared in May 1970 it was roundly savaged for not being Son Of Abbey Road. Two decades later we can accept it for what it is: a low-key, homemade album of considerable charm. Paul plays pretty much all the instruments, with the accent being on acoustic guitars, and there's a kind of folkish air about it that's immediately appealing. If I have a criticism, it's that there's not a lot of truly great *songs* here (exception: the five-star classic Maybe I'm Amazed). Then again, maybe that's not the point. Like Dylan's Nashville Skyline or The Kinks' Village Green, it's the *mood* of the album that casts a magic spell over you, rather than any individual track. Terribly underrated. Several of the songs -- Teddy Boy, Every Night, Junk -- began life as Beatles cast-offs, and one -- Hot As Sun -- dates back to the early days of the Lennon/McCartney songwriting team. Fittingly enough, Paul included a fair whack of this album in his 1991 Unplugged set.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nicely Done, June 15, 2011
By 
J. Kelly (Bayside, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is very well done. Great photos and info about the making of the album. Already ordered McCartney II. Now, if they could only do the same for Let it Be. A nice hardcover book with all of the photos, and the DVD in the back pocket. Come on Apple!
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McCartney
McCartney by Paul McCartney (Audio CD - 1990)
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