The McKinsey Way
Format: HardcoverChange
Price:$16.46+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 29 reviews(1 star)show all reviews
66 of 75 people found the following review helpful
on May 28, 2001
I read this book this afternoon (big print, wide spacing).
The author describes the 80-20 pattern often found in work & life (a phenomenon already familiar to most by which 80% of your business comes from 20% of your clients, 80% of your time is spent on 20% of your to-do list, etc.)
The author demonstrates this chestnut with a book that is 20% useful and fresh and 80% no-brainer advice and shameless McKinsey advertising (we are CONSTANTLY reminded of how smart and ethical all those McKinsey consultants are; all consulting anecdotes have happy endings - unless the client screwed up; real quotes: "As any good McKinsey associate would, this young man applied himself tirelessly and diligently to his task", or "Hank knew his area of the bank inside and out and was probably as smart as any member of the McKinsey team"... high praise indeed.) McKinsey's approving editors have all the subtly of China's Xinhua propaganda agency. Trouble is: many of us know people at McKinsey...
Still, the 'waterfall' chart is among the 20% that make this book worth perusing (but not buying).
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on August 25, 1999
If I could have given it a zero, I would have. I've worked for McKinsey for the past twelve years, and I was stunned at the lack of insight in this book. Even the few observations the author got right are out of date, as the Firm has changed quite a bit in the past few years and this author left McKinsey quite a while ago. I can't imagine how he ever sold this one to a publisher. Vaporware.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 1999
Nothing special in this book -- I would be more than happy to send my copy to anyone that wants it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 27, 2014
The McKinsey Way is a terrible book and its lack of quality has been compounded by how poorly it has aged.

I read this book because I'm interested in management consulting and wanted an insider's perspective without a Hollywood filter.

The author never addresses why he only spent 3 years at McKinsey and he clearly ran out of "insights" after the first couple of chapters.

Nothing would be lost if this piece of writing was condensed to be a chapter in a career pathways pamphlet for high school students rather than a book. The author seems to think that the reader should care that his favourite late night snack is sushi; or that after consulting with many McKinsey alumni, he discovered that people who travel should pack spare clothes; or that McKinsey employees research using the internet.

This book contains 3-5 interesting insights amongst a sea of white space, common sense, and mentions that consultants work long hours. I'll finish with a verbatim example:

"Typically, a McKinsey team blocks out two hours, if not more, for a brainstorming session. Some team leaders prefer weekends for their meetings, though this is not always looked on favourably by the other members of the team. These sessions often run well into the night, fuelled by deliveries of pizza, Chinese food, or sushi (my personal favourite)."
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on June 19, 2000
... There is very, very little useful information. Much ofbook centers around how selective McKinsey is, which is commonknowledge. There is almost a total lack of how strategies particular to McKinsey can be applied to solving business problems. END
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 29, 2013
DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK! The author can't stop talking about how many hours he worked per week. No one cares. We did not buy this book to learn that you worked 80-100 hours per week. We bought this book for insights. There are absolutely none. He talks very briefly about hypothesis driven and MECE, but there is no elaboration. There is an elaborate list of what you should pack when you travel as a consultant and here is a sample from that list (a) Extra shirt for men or extra blouse for women (b) Extra tie for men... and he always carries his credit cards in a separate wallet. This book is a complete waste of your time. DO NOT BUY. You have been warned.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on December 19, 2001
This book is written by someone who is more interested in portraying himself (and "The Firm") as extraordinary rather than communicating anything remotely useful to the reader.
Unlike many excellent publications from ex or current McKinsey-ites this one does no favours to the brand name of the firm.
Pick up any good old Dilbert comic book and you will find yourself more enlightened than with "The McKinsey Way".
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on January 31, 2004
this book was a complete disappointment. it claims to educate business professionals about The McKinsey Way of solving problems. Apparently this amounts to gathering data before proposing a solution and other obvious sentiments. I'm sure McKinsey is a great company, but there are better examples of strategic thinking than those found here.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on August 2, 2006
Mr. Rasiel has written a book on consulting for 3rd graders. It is full of fluff and cliches. At the beginning of each chapter, he outlines its contents in 2 paragraphs, and spends the rest of the chapter illustrating his "points" with weak, unengaging, and not even remotely entertaining anecdotes.

His solution for a member of the client team who would leaf through the presentation booklet at the beginning of a meeting and then tune out? Staple the pages of the book together! Gee thanks, Mr. Rasiel... priceless advice.

Here are some other gems that I found especially helpful:

+ "No one ever said life was fair."

+ "Sometimes a little politeness goes a long way."

+ "When all else fails, have a doorman. Then, at least, you'll come home to clean laundry."

The only valuable information I gleaned from this book is that if Ethan Rasiel is anything like the rest of the McKinsey-ites, I would last no longer than 2 years at the Firm myself. I found myself gritting my teeth at the nauseating tone and pointless content of this book. Save your time and read something (anything) else.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 1999
If I were the CEO of AT&T and this was the wisdom of McKinsey's approach, I'd be asking for a refund. As a long time strategy consultant who has competed with McKinsey and come in after McKinsey, I can tell you that I've never seen that McKinsey has any real differentiation from any other consultant's methodology. There have a lot of smart consultants, but so do any number of other firms. So why are they so successful? Don't expect this book to give you any insight.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.