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Me Without You Soundtrack


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Audio CD, Soundtrack, July 16, 2002
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$19.99
$19.99 $2.30


Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 16, 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B000069JKZ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #382,216 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. White Horses - Lucy Street
2. I Got You Babe - Sonny & Cher
3. (White Man) In Hammersmith Palais - The Clash
4. Just Can't Get Enough - Depeche Mode
5. Skin Deep - The Stranglers
6. The Cutter - Echo & The Bunneymen
7. The Sweetest Girl - Scritti Politti
8. Strange Feelin' - Tim Buckley
9. Cocaine in My Brain - Dillinger
10. January February Barbara Dickson
11. I've Never Been To Me - Charlene
12. Cello Song - Nick Drake
13. Warm Leatherette - The Normal
14. Whole Wide World - Wreckless Eric
15. White Riot - The Clash
16. Kings Of The Wild Frontier - Adam And The Ants
17. Another Girl, Another Planet - The Only Ones
18. (Drawing) Rings Around The World - Super Furry Animals

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

U.K. writer-director Sandra Goldbacher's sophomore feature details the friendship of two London girls from their teens into their 40s, a journey that's typically fraught with as much pathos as humor. As much of the film spans the new wave/punk-besotted '80s, it leans handily on some well-chosen pop tracks from the era, including the Normal's pulsing, electro-macabre "Warm Leatherette," "Just Can't Get Enough" by the original Vince Clarke edition of Depeche Mode, a couple early Clash tracks, "Another Girl, Another World" by the woefully underrated Only Ones, Wreckless Eric's "Whole Wide World," and Scritti Politti's "The Sweetest Girl." But it also underscores a diversity that was easily overlooked in the era, with the arty efforts of the Stranglers ("Skin Deep") and Nick Drake ("Cello Song") helping map out the film's psychic landscape. The remainder spans everything from Sonny & Cher and Tim Buckley to the Super Furry Animals, with Lucy Street's standout pop ballad "White Horses" emphasizing the score's back-to-the-'80s sensibility in winning fashion. --Jerry McCulley

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Serena on June 28, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I was so surprised with this soundtrack. It is full of great music that is not so commonly heard. I loved the movie and the songs fit each era perfectly. Favorite would have to be Whole Wide World and The Normal
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By alexander laurence on April 20, 2004
Format: Audio CD
For anyone born in the mid-1960s this movie and this soundtrack are like a replay of your life. Glam rock on television that you were too young to understand. Sitting at and watching the Sonny and Cher show with your parents. Bad psychedelia which is like childhood revisted. The pleasurable slide into punk and reggae. Endless plays of "Warm Leatherette" by The Normal to figure what it was about. Listening to the only band that matters, The Clash, at high volume. Those were the days of Adam Ant and Depeche Mode. Drugs followed. The music was a background hum to our post college amnesia. Maybe you even read a few books in the meantime? Then now your favorite band is Super Furry Animals. I guess that is more about me than you. You probably liked Michael Jackson and voted for George Bush.
This album evokes the time and so does the movie. Mostly the time around 1977-1984. They even threw some weird songs like "White Horses" by Lucy Street which opens up the great film about two close female friends over decades. Apparently this is what Ian Broudie has been up to lately. "I Got You Babe" is here mainly because it's a song about interdependence, and in this case an unhealthy one. A few Clash songs thrown in just remind us that punk was important at some point. Bands like Depeche Mode, The Stranglers, and Echo and The Bunnymen remind us that the 1980s was not all drugs but some good music occasionally. Some sensitive music by Tim Buckley and Nick Drake is thrown in. Girls love it.
"January February" by Barbara Dickson sounds like some bad television sitcom music and must be for pavlovian reasons. Some music is on this soundtrack is horrible and sentimental. Now we know where Celine Dion has been.
Read more ›
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Frankie J. McCoy on February 21, 2003
Format: Audio CD
[This} soundtrack is totally freakin' awsome.
It has my favourite Echo and the Bunnymen song on it.
"The Cutter."
You should totally buy it.
Because it rules.
Thank you.
The End.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rosetti on August 23, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I was shocked that they used Scritti Politti "Sweetest Girl" in this movie. This tune came out around 1982 or so. Americans and other nationalities probably wouldn't know this song. Only the Brits. They did an excellent job of researching the era that most of the music is released. Where I got confused is during the <?> mid-to-late 80s. Like the scene where they go to the dance club with Kyle M who plays the randy professor. I think they would have synth-pop playing other than Depeche Mode "I Just Can't .." This song is from 1981-82. I assumed that it was a few years later. Back then it seemed like music was constantly changing; and Elvis Costello was still king. ...They would have heard Culture Club and Eurythmics. ...yada yada
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