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Me and You and Everyone We Know


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Product Details

  • Actors: Kelsey Chapman, Hector Elias, Amy French, Ellen Geer, John Hawkes
  • Format: AC-3, Color, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: October 11, 2005
  • Run Time: 91 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (142 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000AMJFYA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,514 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Me and You and Everyone We Know" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Award-winning and critically acclaimed, Me You and Everyone We Know, is a poetic and penetrating look at how everyday people struggle to connect with one another in an isolating modern world. Christine Jesperson (writer/director Miranda July) is a struggling artist and cab driver who uses her talents and imagination to draw her dreams and objects of desire. One such object is Richard Swersey (John Hawkes, TV's "Deadwood"), a newly-single father of two boys who is hoping for amazing things, yet panics upon meeting the captivating Christine. But in a world where the mundane is transcendent and people seek meaningful connections despite the risk, anything magical can happen - and well - happen.

Customer Reviews

One man jams a crucifix into a jar of urine another puts pieces of glass together and hangs a window in a church.
David A. Dein
When the characters finally take a chance and step outside their comfort zone, the film reveals small moments of beauty, in a very human, awkward way.
somethingexcellent
Watch the film by yourself, really think about what's happening and how it can relate to real life, and how some people REALLY ARE quirky or offbeat.
M. Nielson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Keith A. Markus on October 23, 2006
Format: DVD
This film is not for everyone and I appreciate the insights in some of the negative reviews. However, it would be unfortunate if such reviews put off viewers to who might otherwise connect with the film. I will try to offer a more successful reading.

The movie's most self-referential scene involves the playful conversation between the two lead characters as they walk to their respective cars. In offering their respective interpretations of the walk, they each take chances by playing a game at the risk that the other will not play along. It is precisely this vulnerability of the characters that makes the characters so endearing and the main narrative so romantic. By taking the risks and playing along with the conversation, they each reveal to the other a common openness to a shared way of relating to the world. By extension, through the entire film Miranda July takes risks, asking the viewer "this is game that I am playing, are you willing to play along?"

A less central but significant scene recognizes that not everyone is willing to play along. An awkward and unsuccessful conversation in the intimate setting of a female character's bathroom between two recently separated characters presents them as each good and decent individuals who simply cannot connect with one another successfully. I take this sympathetic representation of the separated wife as one of the most admirable dimensions of the film. It celebrates the playful artistic stance of the two main characters, the quality that brings them together and allows them to connect, while respecting the alternative ways that other characters relate to the world around them.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on November 7, 2006
Format: DVD
Self-consciously "arty" at every turn, it's easy to see why many people love "Me and You and Everyone We Know"--but it's just as easy for me to see why people also loathe this film. Performance artist Miranda July has fashioned a piece about urban disconnect and lost souls and has populated it with quirky characters and outlandish situations. And while many compare the tone of the film to a Todd Solondz picture, to me it doesn't have quite the same brash in-your-face entertainment style. July's piece is quieter and more contemplative.

"Quirky" has become the new curse on the indie film scene. There are an abundance of films that work with outlandish character types--we're supposed to be instantly charmed. But for all the films that utilize this formula, few are really successful (for me, two diverse examples would be Solondz's "Happiness" or even "Junebug"). And while July doesn't quite reach those heights, there is still plenty to be admired in her first effort.

One very smart choice is that everything is underplayed! The situations aren't particularly believable, but the feelings elicited from them have a truth and sweetness. I used the phrase "finding the realness in unreality" in another review, and I think it's apt here too. While I didn't believe many of the plot points were realistic, there was still a thoughtfulness and heart behind them--and I think there are parts of the film that will stay with you.

The actors are uniformly good. Again, the success of the film rests on it's subtlety. Most of the performances were understated, it was as if life were just unfolding around these characters. Had any of this been played broadly, it would have been disastrous.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By nikki on September 27, 2005
Format: DVD
This movie is fantastic, period. Each scene is so colourful and humourous and touching. What makes this movie so good to me are all the little, seconds-long moments of weirdness/sadness/cuteness which really (cheesy as it sounds) Touch Your Heart. Keep an eye out for the goldfish scene, the talking picture-frame scene, and the mug scene for an idea of what i'm talking about. And the little boy who plays the part of the younger son is phenomenal. i am usually annoyed by child actors but this little boy is so genuine and lovable. you would never, ever know that the things coming out of his mouth are pre-scripted lines. i ended up liking and caring about every single character and, more than that, feeling really moved by the visuals and the aforesaid asides that come and go so quickly.

i appreciate this movie the same way i might appreciate a beautiful photograph- with respect and wonder.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By SummerKy on July 16, 2009
Format: DVD
Delicate flowers beware...are you offended by children accessing the internet and talking dirty? (they do this you realize)

Are you offended by teenaged girls flirting and exploring and using their ever-budding sexuality in a mulititude of ways? (they do this also you realize)

If so don't bother!

This is a strange, hypnotic and eclectic film that is primally addicting, even if you're not sure how to feel about what these characters are doing and saying, you can't stop watching. (ofcourse unless your a delicate flower with your head in the sand)

In a very abstract way this film examines the way people communicate. What we say vs. what we mean.

There are no movies stars, no super effects in this film. The people are real, they aren't going to gloss a pin-up magazine anytime soon. If you find sadness in this film you are only seeing one side of it, quite clearly we live our lives all over the emotional map and this film explores that quite effectively.

Give it a try if you can toughen up enough to handle it or maybe instead you don't even need toughening up, you already like awkward, brilliant films just left of center.
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