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A Measure of Malpractice: Medical Injury, Malpractice Litigation, and Patient Compensation Hardcover – January 31, 1993

ISBN-13: 978-0674558809 ISBN-10: 0674558804 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 178 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; 1 edition (January 31, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674558804
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674558809
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #463,371 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Undoubtedly this decade's most important book about medical negligence, A Measure of Malpractice provides a welcome antidote to the mythology and disinformation that has permeated most policy debate on the subject. This terse report, dense in data but not in style, summarizes in surprising detail the monumental work of the Harvard Medical Practice Study--distilling into one slender book the observations and analysis reported in fuller but more fragmentary form in various earlier publications. It should be required reading for every participant in the health care reform effort. (Thomas A. Parrino Annals of Internal Medicine)

This is a remarkable piece of research which ought to be picked up by anyone with an interest in tort and its effectiveness as a remedy for personal injuries. In cutting through so much of the hyperbole around medical negligence litigation, it might also provoke us to explore further the neglected question of the origins and nature of this moral panic. (Robert Dingwall International Journal of the Sociology of Law)

About the Author

Paul Weiler is the Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law at Harvard University.

Joseph P. Newhouse is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Health Policy and Management, Harvard University.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By W H van Boom on July 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
For me as a European law professor this - admittedly somewhat outdated book - was very helpful in many respects: it showed me how thorough research on the tort process and its shortcomings is performed and it also convinced me that medical malpractice is quite different from say automobile accidents as far as the role of tort law is concerned. I think that this is a good book to read for anyone studying the tort process and evaluating the arguments for and against alternative patient insurance arrangements. I was a bit disappointed by the final chapter ('Ruminations for the future'), because the policy statements and suggestions for reform in that chapter are in my opinion not really firmly backed by the empirical evidence of the previous chapters.
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