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Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing out of Sync? [Kindle Edition]

Seth Godin
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.00
Kindle Price: $10.99
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Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC

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Book Description

?Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don?t care, as long as it?s shiny and new.?

Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make it taste great. But if you start with a bowl of meatballs . . . yuck!

As traditional marketing fades away, the new tools seem irresistible. But they don?t work as well for boring brands (?meatballs?) that might still be profitable but don?t attract word of mouth, such as Cheerios, Ford trucks, Barbie dolls, or Budweiser. When Anheuser-Busch spends $40 million on an online network called BudTV, that?s a meatball sundae. It leads to no new Bud drinkers, just a bad case of indigestion.

Meatball Sundae is the definitive guide to the fourteen trends no marketer can afford to ignore. It explains what to do about the increasing power of stories, not facts; about shorter and shorter attention spans; and about the new math that says five thousand people who want to hear your message are more valuable than five million who don?t.

The winners aren?t just annoying start-ups run by three teenagers who never had a real job. You?ll also meet older companies that have adapted brilliantly, such as Blendtec, a thirty-year-old blender maker. It now produces ?Will it blend?? videos that demolish golf balls, Coke cans, iPhones, and much more. For a few hundred dollars, Blendtec reached more than ten million eager viewers on YouTube.

Godin doesn?t pretend that it?s easy to get your products, marketing messages, and internal systems in sync. But he?ll convince you that it?s worth the effort.




Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Godin's latest business handbook (after Small Is the New Big and The Dip) revisits some of his most popular marketing advice, while emphasizing that it can't just be applied willy-nilly. In past decades, he says, companies were able to get rich by making average products for average people, but those markets have long since been sewn up; mass is no longer achievable [or] desirable. Rather than simply rely on mass media to raise product visibility, New Marketing treats every aspect of interacting with customers—including customer service and the product itself—as an opportunity to grow the organization. In order to be successful with such marketing techniques, a company must change its practices across the board. Otherwise, you're just putting whipped cream on a meatball. Godin has a perspective on everything from blogs (don't bother unless you really have something to say) to the long tail (if it's as valuable to your company as the top sellers are, why aren't you paying more attention?). His arresting conversational style is sure to once again set the business world talking. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Godin…is a clear-eyed visionary with strong and sensible ideas on how the new economy can, should and will function."—Miami Herald (Miami Herald)

[Godin's] arresting conversational style is sure to once again set the business world talking. - Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly)

Product Details

  • File Size: 408 KB
  • Print Length: 268 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1591841747
  • Publisher: Portfolio; Reprint edition (December 27, 2007)
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000XPPVLK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #476,438 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy a copy of Meatball Sundae for your boss* December 26, 2007
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
When I deliver keynote speeches and run seminars at companies, I am often asked for advice on how to convince the bosses that the new rules of marketing really work. Frequently people say something like: "My bosses make me prove ROI before I can do this online thought leadership and viral marketing stuff."

My cynical answer is: "What's the ROI of putting on your pants in the morning?"

But then I suggest that people to ask their boss if in the past few months, they've made a product or service decision based on a direct mail piece they received or based on a TV advertisement. (Almost no bosses have). Then I say they should ask their boss if in the past few months they've used Google or another search engine to make a product or service decision. (Virtually all bosses have).

Well now I have something else to suggest. Buy a copy of Seth Godin's Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing out of Sync? for your bosses.* Tell them it is an important book. Meatball Sundae will be your tool to help others in your organization to understand what you already get and what you are eager to implement. It will help you to get the buy-in to do the new rules of marketing that you know makes sense.

But first your bosses may need to transform your company.

Meatball Sundae lays out in a convincing manner the transformations that are taking place in business today. These transformations mean that everything needs to be looked at carefully, including marketing. But to just toss new marketing onto the top of obsolete business models is like putting whipped cream and a cherry onto meatballs to make a sundae. (Yuk).

Godin tells a story I really like.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
If you had a bowl of meatballs and wanted to dress them up a bit before you served them, would you add whipped cream, a sprinkle of nuts, and a cherry on top? A meatball sundae doesn't sound attractive? Seth Godin knows how to write with snappy images to get his ideas across in crisp, concise, and memorable images. The idea of the meatball sundae is used to illustrate old style companies trying to "get with it" by using the New Marketing paradigm without updating anything else. One of the examples he cites is the $40 million Anheuser-Busch spent on Bud-TV to add zero new customers. I am not qualified to judge the appropriateness of the effort or what Bud was after, but I do agree with the author that the goal of all marketing, in the end, has to be to create more customers.

The book has three parts that each consists of multiple short sections that focus on aspects of the topic under discussion. Part 1 is "Thinking About the Meatball Sundae" and takes us through the history of marketing in the US and how it has gone through several upheavals and how those who got their marketing in synch with the new realities won.

Part 2 is "The Fourteen Trends", which discusses the realities of the New Marketing.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Godin again advances marketing innovation. 5 Stars! January 1, 2008
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Godin does an excellent job demonstrating why "old dogs" (the meatballs) and "new tricks" (the sundae toppings) often fail. His primary premise is that the techniques of Old Marketing (that is, interruptive marketing such as billboards, tv ads, and so forth) is dying, if not already dead. The problem for the adherents of Old Marketing is that they are unable to sync New Marketing innovations with their mass market products. They have been too focused on mass media, instead of consumer-to-consumer word of mouth marketing approaches. He then skillfully lists about a dozen other out-of-sync issues. The problem is that our societal changes and product individualization expectations have resulted in the consumer longing for altogether new (innovative) products through these New Marketing channels. We no longer want the built-for-everyone solution -- even if the maker starts a blog or other viral messaging about the item. I feel Godin does a great job of bringing together a number of key issues presented in some of his earlier works (such as Permission Marketing), as well as telling authentic stories (pick up "All Marketers are Liars" by Godin or "Why Johnny Can't Brand" by Schley and Nichols), along with some of the recent word of mouth marketing writings (such as "Word of Mouth Marketing" by Sernovitz and "Buzzmarketing" by Hughes). For good measure, "Make it Stick" is a great discussion of what makes certain events and ideas have lasting impacts on our psyche.

It is clear that Godin does not put forth his ideas as easy -- largely due to the decades (even centuries if you consider his Wedgwood example) of established marketing tradition, and the mega billion dollar machine that keeps the entire system going -- regardless of its increasing ineffectiveness. Nevertheless, Godin will make you a true believer in the need to make the changes -- not just to endure, but to thrive.

This is an A+ read and is worth your attention.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a thinker
Very good. But you don't need to know that if you've read any Godin.

I just finished and I feel a bit lost. Read more
Published 17 days ago by Effy
5.0 out of 5 stars Time to update your marketing!
Meatball Sundae is a great read! Godin is very persuasive, stating his arguments clearly and concisely, winning over anyone who reads the book. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Nancy Everett
3.0 out of 5 stars Encouraging
Interesting read, and I've read it several times over, because it took me a while to digest what Mr. Godin was saying about getting your marketing in sync with your product. Read more
Published 4 months ago by P.L. Alexander
5.0 out of 5 stars Read This Book If You're Wondering Why Social Media Isn't Working For...
As an internet marketer, I see a lot of Meatball Sundae businesses fail at using the new technologies, or New Marketing as Seth Godin calls it. Read more
Published 13 months ago by Wendell Chong
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Europe time now
Despite the fact that it was published in 2007 I do strongly believe that Seth's book is still up to date and might come in handy for people living outside the States. Read more
Published on January 8, 2012 by FRANCESCO FERZINI
3.0 out of 5 stars It's OK. It could be summarized in 20 pages.
The idea of the book is OK. It could be resumed in just 20 pages. The author repeats and repeats the concept a lot. Read more
Published on November 20, 2011 by Iñaki
5.0 out of 5 stars Great tips and entertaining case studies
"Although not so recent.. still very appplicable tips. Love the case studies with history of brands and how they have evolved."
Published on June 12, 2011 by Juliana Loh
5.0 out of 5 stars Convincing, relevant, riveting!
I simply can't recommend this book enough! If you're not already convinced that the rules of marketing have changed big time in our Internet-saturated business world, Godin will... Read more
Published on March 28, 2011 by nrenicker
5.0 out of 5 stars Advertising In 2011? You Need To Read This Book
I had heard that this book was a eye opener, but after reading it, I have to say that is a understatement. Read more
Published on February 6, 2011
5.0 out of 5 stars Internet marketing great insight
Great book... it really makes you (the marketer) think twice about how you treat each individual customer. It's a great way to do business when you really think about it. Read more
Published on August 5, 2010 by K. Christensen
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More About the Author

Seth Godin is the author of fifteen international bestsellers that have been translated into over 35 languages, and have changed the way people think about marketing and work. For a long time, Unleashing the Ideavirus was the most popular ebook ever published, and Purple Cow is the bestselling marketing book of the decade.

His book, Tribes, was a nationwide bestseller, appearing on the Amazon, New York Times, BusinessWeek and Wall Street Journal bestseller lists. It's about the most powerful form of marketing--leadership--and how anyone can now become a leader, creating movements that matter.

His book Linchpin came out in 2008 and was the fastest selling book of his career. Linchpin challenges you to stand up, do work that matters and race to the top instead of the bottom. More than that, though, the book outlines a massive change in our economy, a fundamental shift in what it means to have a job.

Since Linchpin, Godin has published two more books, Poke the Box and We Are All Weird, through his Domino Project.

Recently, he launched The Icarus Deception via Kickstarter, which reached its goal in less than three hours. It will be available to the public in January of 2013.

In addition to his writing and speaking, Seth is founder and CEO of Squidoo.com, a fast growing recommendation website. His blog (find it by typing "seth" into Google) is the most popular marketing blog in the world. Before his work as a writer and blogger, Godin was Vice President of Direct Marketing at Yahoo!, a job he got after selling them his pioneering 1990s online startup, Yoyodyne.

You can find every single possible detail that anyone could ever want to know at squidoo.com/seth.

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Can it be done with a dentist? There are many new advances but it typically like a meatball.
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