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Medea (Focus Classical Library) Paperback – January 1, 1991


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Editorial Reviews

Review

“Taplin’s eminently readable version of this harrowing tragedy justifies his reputation as one of our foremost experts in dramatic criticism, whose pioneering efforts in illuminating ancient stagecraft remain indispensable today.”
(Froma Zeitlin, Princeton University)

“Euripides’s influential and provocative Medea continues to be read, performed, adapted, and reinterpreted in multiple contexts across the globe. Taplin’s accessible and performable, yet vivid and poetic translation makes the play available to a modern audience while doing justice to both its complexities and its horrific power.”
(Helene P. Foley, Barnard College, Columbia University)

“Taplin translates Medea into clear and contemporary English while reflecting well the different registers and tones that create the subtle texture of Greek tragedy. His version is eminently speakable, but also highly faithful to the original Greek, making it ideal for instructors and readers who want to study closely the specific metaphors and terms that carry the classic themes of this influential drama.”
(Donald J. Mastronarde, University of California, Berkeley) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Anthony Podlecki is professor emeritus at the University of British Columbia. Educated at Holy Cross College, Oxford University and the University of Toronto, he taught at Northwestern University and Pennsylvania State University before joining the staff of the University of British Columbia in 1975. He has translated various Greek tragedies and has written several books on Athenian history.
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Product Details

  • Series: Focus Classical Library
  • Paperback: 94 pages
  • Publisher: Focus; Revised edition (January 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0941051102
  • ISBN-13: 978-0941051101
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.3 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,190,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. Lotfinia on November 6, 2009
Format: Plastic Comb
Kwintner's edition, being part of the Bryn Mawr series, will get you through the Greek if you're approaching the text early in your career. Don't expect extensive information about the Medea myth or Attic tragedy or copious literary or cultural notes, since Kwintner focuses on morphology, vocabulary (she does seem fond, however, of pointing out the odd instance of chiasmus). Be aware that there are errors in the text: on at least two occasions there was a superfluous omega with iota-subscript instead of a space between two words. There were also parts in the commentary that my professor disputed, but make of that what you will. In terms of the book's physical construction, the spiral-binding is beyond irritating: I found it impossible to open and close with ease. The paper is also cheap, even by comparison to other entries in the BMC series: in terms of durability, it's somewhere between a newspaper and a photo-copy.

Considering the low price and target audience, these are forgivable faults, but skip this volume and proceed directly to Mastronarde's Cambridge edition if you don't need the linguistic hand-holding.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. on August 20, 2013
Format: Plastic Comb Verified Purchase
Euripides' Medea is essential reading for any Greek student but Kwintner's edition doesn't really do it justice. There are a lot of bizarre typos in the Greek text -- and a beginning Greek student will have a hard enough time with a perfect text, let alone one that's been messed up by the editor. I bought this for a course and shortly afterward switched to the edition by Denys L. Page. Apparently the Cambridge edition is also very worthwhile.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 22, 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
This fine production shows how hard Medea is to stage even in audio. The power is dissipated when Medea screeches her anger. Her quiet is stronger than her loud. Listening to this performance deepens our feeling for this great play.
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Format: Paperback
This version is packed up in something like two days. And important changes are introduced.

It starts when Medea, Jason and their children arrive in Corinth running away from Iolcos after the death or assassination of the king Pelias. The first scene is in fact Medea burying on the beach the chest of her witchcraft with all her charms and tools, including her wand and the Golden Fleece.

Then comes Creon and Jason begs for hospitality. It is granted openly by Creon especially since Creusa, his daughter remembers the time when Jason was young and was raised in Corinth by Creon himself since his father was dead and he was not wanted in Iolcos where his uncle had usurped the throne, after assassinated Jason's father. The invitation is extended to the children and even Medea. This last one is invited by Creusa herself.

But some herald arrives from Delphi where the Amphictyons of the Amphityonic League are administering some kind of justice over the various independent Greek kingdoms and cities. They were seized by the son of Pelias and they decided that the culprits responsible for the death of Pelias are Jason, Medea and the children. The herald asks for these to be delivered to him to be taken back to Delphi for trial and execution. Creon refuses for Jason and the kids who are taken care of by Creusa. But he refuses to extend his protection to Medea and banishes her from Corinth. At this moment the kids are called by Medea and they refuse to come.

From there the delirium that seizes Medea over is going to work its deadly curse. Creon brings the chest some slaves have recovered from the beach and asks Medea to open it and deliver the Golden Fleece to him.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson TOP 1000 REVIEWER on August 5, 2013
Format: Paperback
Having given up home and family and virtually everything else to help Jason and the Argonauts in their quest for the Golden Fleece, Medea was stunned when Jason arranged to leave her and marry the rich and beautiful daughter of the queen of Corinth. But, Medea is a proud and capable woman, and she will not allow those that would abuse her to triumph in their plans. With cunning and resolve, she lays a plan so terrible that everyone around her will suffer her revenge, mostly Jason, the father of her children.

The Athenian playwright Euripides first saw his play, Medea, performed in 431 B.C. The play won third prize. But, that same play is now considered to have been one of the greatest works of Western literature to have ever been produced.

The story is powerful, with a brooding gloom hanging over it, as you, like the chorus, know what is going to happen and watch it with the same horror as watching a train wreck unfold. I liked how you knew what was going to happen, seeing the crime in all its cold-blooded terror. Euripides was indeed a genius, and I highly recommend this play to anyone who wants to know what great literature really is.

In his 1697 play, The mourning bride, William Congreve wrote, "Heav'n has no Rage, like Love to Hatred turn'd, Nor Hell a Fury, like a Woman scorn'd." But, it had all happened before...long before. I highly recommend this classic!
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By Lyubka Daskalska on March 30, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was in a good condition and better price than in the book store. My daughter needed it for her literature class and it served the purpose well.
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Medea (Focus Classical Library)
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