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on November 23, 2012
This book is about the heroic response country doctors make to the absurd, or terrifying, situations they find themselves in - which can happen in the Appalachians. It's about the laying on of hands. Caring for people and touching things we might prefer to run away from. We don't normally think of doctors as priests as they were in ancient times but we get a sense of it in this book. For me it is Christ at work in the head, hearts and hands of the characters Carolyn describes. Don't pass this one by.
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on November 18, 2012
A wonderful follow-up to 'Heart in the Right Place', this book is poignant, funny, sad and always inspiring. These are human stories of heroism, compassion, love and endurance in the face of insurmountable obstacles. Stories like this make us feel good about the world and humanity in general - something sorely needed! I highly recommend it!
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on December 12, 2012
A very heartwarming book full of little tales about various Appalachian Doctors over the past century. The author is the daughter of one of the old doctors of the Appalachians. The stories are very believable and will easily transport you back to a time when doctors actually made house calls.. even to homes that were way out in the middle of nowhere. These were men who were true healers. Doctors who cared deeply about the health of their patients. Many times.. accepting no pay at all.. or taking nearly anything the family had to offer.. even if it was a pet raccoon! I loved the story about the fellow who left the Appalachians and made quite a success out of himself.. then.. came back to pay for not only his OWN birth.. but, that of all of his siblings.. Nearly three decades later! Stories like that.. just give you such a warm feeling! Excellent book!! One that I'd highly recommend to anyone that needs a lift to their spirits.. and to restore their faith in mankind!
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on November 23, 2012
I downloaded this morning and only had time to read through chapter 4 and have already laughed out loud (several times) and cried and can't wait to get back to it. Events of the day made me put it down, but I am hoping for my normal 2 a.m. wakefulness so I can get back to this very good read.
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on December 9, 2012
You can't make this stuff up! For those, like me, who live and love this region of the U.S., there are no surprises. It's about a place south of the sweet-tea line (that place where waitresses ask you if you want tea but tell you that you have to sweeten it yourself). Here, we have friends with names like Snake, Rabbit, or Turtle. We all have heard accounts of highly successful doctors who chose to practice in the area when they could have made their fortunes as specialists in cities just minutes or hours away. This is a wonderful collection of such stories and a tribute to the unselfishness and humanity of these professionals.
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on December 6, 2012
It does seem that the more modern medicine advances in technology, the further it retreats from the true meaning of healing--treating, and knowing and loving and respecting the *whole patient*, including the person, the place, the circumstances, the life being lived or, in some cases, the life being eased to its end. These old doctors knew that, and lived it, right alongside their patients, and Carolyn captures it in vignettes that will make you laugh, smile, tear up, sit stunned for a moment, and remember forever.

Unlike her brilliant first book, "Heart in the Right Place," in which the author herself was smack in the middle of the action, in "Medicine Men," Carolyn mostly steps aside and lets her subjects star in their own delightful tales. Such a subtle and deft, light touch upon this type of storytelling is a rare talent in itself and she masters it. This is an author I will definitely collect. And heartily recommend. And await the next book in gleeful and less than patient (err, so to speak) anticipation!
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on December 2, 2012
Carolyn Jourdan writes about a vanishing breed of doctors who not only made house calls, but also risked life and limb to care for isolated folks in nearly inaccessible parts of eastern Tennessee. Most of the doctors that she interviewed for "Medicine Men" are gone now. But they left behind stories as touching as the heroic World War II vet who was convinced the Marines were after him for desertion - or as hilarious as the woman in childbirth whose filthy bed in a remote mountain shack was guarded by her vicious pet groundhogs. You won't find such extraordinary true tales anywhere else, and Jourdan - who was born and raised in eastern Tennessee, and returned from a cushy Washington, D.C. job to live in the area once again - creates wonderfully rich and sympathetic portraits of larger-than-life physicians and patients alike. Don't miss this gem - or I might just have to sic a groundhog on you.
- Bob Tarte, Author of "Kitty Cornered" and "Enslaved by Ducks"
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on January 5, 2014
This is a collection of brief anecdotes based on interviews with seasoned rural doctors. It is poignant, heartwarming, sad,funny. It is a quick read.

I would have preferred a bit more depth. There were many of the stories where I wanted to know what happened next. I also wanted to know more about the people who live in this part of the country.

I'm not sorry I spent the time reading this book, I just wish there had been more to it.
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on December 12, 2012
Some years ago I spent time in the Appalachian region with the CAP program and loved the Appalachian people and their philosophic approach to life. The stories really touched a soft spot in my heart and I truly admire the author's way of sharing her stories in this book.
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on May 28, 2014
Yeah, some of the stories were heartwarming...I guess. Really, this was just a random conglomeration of stories put together by the author in seemingly no particular order and with often no particular thought to how to structure the stories so they seemed to make sense together. She goes back and forth between doctors, not really introducing them, not really giving a reason for why this story is particularly interest. If this is a sequel to earlier works, the author should still offer some introduction to people for those readers who are picking up this book first. I found few of the stories to be what I had in my mind to be "extreme doctoring" of any kind. In some cases, there wasn't any doctoring at all. I was, essentially, happy to have only paid a small amount for this on Kindle.
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