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Medicine Woman Paperback – November 16, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Tarcher (November 16, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585425265
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585425266
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Medicine Woman has to do with the meaning of life, the role of women, and the wrestling of power away form the forces of evil that hold it." -- Los Angeles Times

"Medicine Woman is the autobiographical account of a woman's search for identity in a Native American culture... What begins as a search for a Native American marriage basket becomes Lynn Andrews' often terrifying journey into the wilderness of Manitoba, where inexplicable events and dangerous encounters serve as testing grounds for Lynn's spiritual journey... In the light of this odyssey, one wonders if Carlos Castaneda and Lynn Andrews have not initiated a new genre of contemporary literature: Visionary Autobiography" -- San Francisco Review of Books

"A statement of what is called for and possible in all of us." -- Sojourner

"First Class... A remarkable adventure into the world of the spirit." -- San Francisco Examiner-Chronicle

"There is much wisdom here... What sometimes appears as madness may contain its own wisdom; and what may sometimes sound like wisdom may be madness. It is precisely this intricate balance that the medicine woman must learn to keep." -- Santa Fe Reporter --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Lynn Andrews is the author of nineteen books, including the New York Times bestsellers Medicine Woman and Jaguar Woman. A preeminent teacher in the field of personal development and spirituality, she is the founder of the Lynn Andrews Center for Sacred Arts and Training.

Customer Reviews

Very interesting reading of this Lynn Adrews book.
Inga Sigurðardóttir
As I read, I was left to wonder if it was fact or fiction.... Either way, it is a gripping story line about personal power.
J. Deelstra
The magic described in Lynn Andrews' books is real!
Apprentice Shaman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 91 people found the following review helpful By CaroleB on September 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
After reading the book Medicine Woman and the San Francisco Review of Books on the back which says this is an Autobiographical I have to question a few things.

I come from Manitoba and have lived there over 50 years. I've never heard of a Crowley and the Cree First Nations in Manitoba that I was raised with would not be seeing a Kokopelli or a Kachina. It's not part of their culture.

The last and final huge mistake is the fact that most of this story could not have taken place outside without huge huge bottles of mosquitoe repellant as anyone who lives in the bush in Manitoba knows especially those who may have a reason to go naked in the woods.

Perhaps Lynn shouldn't be peddling her strange brand of spiritualism as true when it's not. There are enough charlatans in the world without one stealing someone's culture and calling it her own for the sake of the almight dollar.

Carole
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33 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Wildway on July 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
When I read Medicine Woman I taken aback at how it possibly could have convinced anyone that it was anything other than a mildly absurd romance. Still, not being a native person or living in Manitoba, where the events of the novel take place, I thought it presumptuous of me to offer judgement on the events related in this work. A quick search on-line lead to me the Canadian Journal of Native Studies, who reviewed Andrews' work when it first came out, but here is a small taste of what the Manitoba native community thought of her work:

'... the novel reaches its misinformed heights when the narrator arrives in Canada. True to a Californian's perception of Manitoba, the narrator steps off a plane in Winnipeg and sets off across " the Canadian tundra." The time is year is supposedly spring, yet Andrews describes the "grand rolling fields" where "green grasses twisted and curled in the wind" (p.21) Prairie grass does not get long enough to blow in the breeze until July, which means that the narrator either does not know what season it is, or believes that it is cold enough on the "tundra" at all seasons to justify her "sweaters, wool socks, and flannel pajamas."
Andrews' first encounter with the Cree in Crowley typifies her misguided and often insulting perception of native people. Throughout the book, the natives treat her with indifference, insult, or degradation, and the narrator is either too slow-witted, or too taken with the esoteric nature of her experiences to realize it. Although supposedly a reserve town, Crowley is just like all the Western towns in Hollywood movies. It consists of some houses and a "Trading Post" full of "brown round-faced children eating Hostess cupcakes.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
Upon receiving this title as required reading for graduate studies, I thought to myself, where can I find the cliff notes? That was then. Medicine woman has awaken my womaness and my spirituality. I have not experienced anything so powerful in quite a long time. As a passenger on the journey of finding the true self, when my stop came I did not want to get off. Bravo Lynn! This book is for the dreamer and the lover of life. It is definetly worth reading and passing on.
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47 of 62 people found the following review helpful By "whistling_feather" on March 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
Having read this book with ever more incredulity as I turned over the pages, I realized that this author is just out there for people's hard earned money! Do not waste your time or money on this fictitious nonesense. There are so many wonderful books about shamanism and native American spirituality on the market that are for real. This is certainly not one. Just check out this woman's web site to see how she is milking the public for her own gain!
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32 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Kelly on November 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is an okay story compared to later books , but it should read in big letters: Fiction or Fictional account based on events. The Lakota and other Native Americans have taken Andrews (as well as Castaneda and others) to task for forging their spirituality and have called on her to reveal the book as fiction both in person and in various articles on the web. (...)
When I first read it, I thought it was a wonderful story but was perplexed by the essential bimbo-ness of the author's character throughout the novel. She was always whining. She acted like a "girl" well throughout the first books of the series yet she wasn't a girl for anyone who did the math. Then I logged on and found out what she charged for her seminars and it was all very clear. Each book read more and more like a screenplay rather than spiritual instruction. She definitely targets her market and it appeals to the little girl love of fairy tales and exotic fantasies that live on in many adult women. For the spirituality that an adult requires, however, it's a bad hash of not much.
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43 of 57 people found the following review helpful By "loboshe" on July 10, 2002
Format: Paperback
Though this is a good FICTION book, I am amazed that Lynn Andrews thinks we are dumb enough to believe this is an autobiography. Give me a break!! After doing some research on the internet, I am also amazed to find out that her live-in companion at the time this was written was David Carson (co-author with Jamie Sands in Medicine Cards book) who, at the time, claimed HE helped her write it. Also note that in the Medicine Cards book, David dedicates the book to three aunts, and two happen to have the names Ruby and Agnes---the same two female characters in Medicine Woman...hmmmmm. I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone. There are plenty of other SINCERE and HONEST books about Native American Shaminism and spirituality without wasting your time on this one.
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More About the Author

Lynn Andrews is the author of 19 books and workbooks chronicling her amazing adventures into the world of spirit, the real life worlds of her native teachers and their profound wisdom of ancient spiritual worlds, including New York Times and internationally best-selling Medicine Woman series.

International speaker and spiritual leader, teacher, healer; writing teacher; noted authority on achieving personal power and architect of the "act of power."

Founder of 4-year "Mystery School" and graduate program; Joshua Tree Gathering and Hawaii Retreat; www.lynnandrews.com, offering Online Courses and Sacred Forum; International Councils of the Whistling Elk.


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