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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book is easy to read and comprehend
I love this book very much because it discussed different aspects of medical anthropology, which is the objective of our class. Also, I love it due to its respect, and appreciation to Navajo healing practices as well as Hispanic culture. It honors women healers as the title of the book states. Everyone in the medical field should spare some time to read this because it...
Published 17 months ago by Maylene

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3.0 out of 5 stars book review
Dry reading at the beginning but so historically relevant and much improvement once they got into the individual backgrounds and stories. .
Published 1 month ago by Gloria F. Friddell


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book is easy to read and comprehend, February 9, 2013
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This review is from: Medicine Women, Curanderas, and Women Doctors (Paperback)
I love this book very much because it discussed different aspects of medical anthropology, which is the objective of our class. Also, I love it due to its respect, and appreciation to Navajo healing practices as well as Hispanic culture. It honors women healers as the title of the book states. Everyone in the medical field should spare some time to read this because it is very eye opening and interesting to read.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Information Doesn't Age, January 11, 2008
By 
Gigi (Indiana, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Medicine Women, Curanderas, and Women Doctors (Paperback)
So it was published in 1991. The ideas they're writing about were established hundreds of years ago.
This book is written in 4 parts. Part one, medicine women. Part two, cuanderas. Part three, female doctors. Part four, the authors reflections.
In each part they interview three women who practice their healing art.

Informative.
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3.0 out of 5 stars book review, June 22, 2014
Dry reading at the beginning but so historically relevant and much improvement once they got into the individual backgrounds and stories. .
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4.0 out of 5 stars interesting words, March 8, 2014
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it was a book for a class but i still managed to read the chapters that weren't assigned its a very interesting book.
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15 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Journey, March 10, 2003
By 
Benjamin G. Gardner (Parkville, MO United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Medicine Women, Curanderas, and Women Doctors (Paperback)
Medicine Women, Curanderas, and Women Doctors makes for an interesting, enlightening read. It relates the personal philosophies of a handful of women-Native American Medicine Women, Hispanic curanderas, and female MD's-and delves into their motivations while examining their impact on the world around them. At the same time, it traces the journey-some might call it a spiritual quest-which the authors follow to ultimate, fulfilling enlightenment regarding the place of women in all aspects of life. A monument to the strength of women the world over, the authors have compiled an argument in favor of traditional and holistic medical science and the woman's place within that science.
However, in examining various points of view, the authors repeatedly commit several faults. One of them is continuous criticism of Christianity and the Anglo-European way of life in contrast to the sometimes pantheistic and often superstitious viewpoints held by folk healers. I believe that undeserved judgment is leveled on the American culture as a whole, when such judgment might be better and more fairly reserved for its abuses.

Another fault is that in presenting a wide assortment of individuals who believe strongly in differing aspects of healing, the focus of the book becomes too diffused and generalized to maintain truly profound significance. In detailing the beliefs of the pantheistic Indians, the fervently monotheistic Hispanics, and the skeptically religious women doctors of today, and by mustering these viewpoints against the errors and abuses of anti-traditionalism without allowing them to dialogue among themselves, the authors leave the reader with a sense of ideological dissonance and irrelevance.
However, on the positive side, the reader does come away with an appreciation for the strength and determination of women the world over in providing comfort and healing. Too, the obvious link between an individual's mental/psychological state and his physical well being cannot and should not be ignored. These two insights, as well as a clear look at the context and history of all the influences that have been brought to bear on the healing process, are very valuable. This book is not only an interesting journey, it is a very insightful, educational one, as well.
- Benjamin Gene Gardner
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Medicine Women, Curanderas, and Women Doctors
Medicine Women, Curanderas, and Women Doctors by Bobette Perrone (Paperback - March 15, 1993)
$19.95 $14.92
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