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Medieval Furniture: Plans and Instructions for Historical Reproductions Paperback – August 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Stackpole Books; 1ST edition (August 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811728544
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811728546
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #264,615 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Those wishing to create furniture very few living people have seen the like of need look no further than this book. The furniture described in it is based on one-of-a-kind museum pieces 400 years old and older. Many of the originals haven't met the test of time very well, it is true, and Diehl and Donnelly fudge the measurements a tad, if only to make things come out reasonably square and true. Those who dive into this book and its predecessor, Constructing Medieval Furniture (1997), should possess considerable woodworking skills and able carving and metalworking hands. These projects aren't for beginners, and the pieces themselves aren't what one would see in a typical modern home. It also helps not to forget that, for example, the church pew herein was originally built when you got 10-foot boards 2 inches thick and 18 inches wide by heading out to the forest and harvesting them. Very much on an offbeat subject, this book is simply wonderful because of that. Jon Kartman

About the Author

Mark Donnelly has collaborated with Dan Diehl on 18 books and more than 100 hours of documentary television, including programs for the Discovery, History, and Biography channels.

Daniel Diehl has collaborated with Mark Donnelly on 18 books and more than 100 hours of documentary television, including programs for the Discovery, History, and Biography channels.

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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 72 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
Unfortunately, this edition repeats many of the inaccuracies of the first book. If you are an experienced woodworker, the measured drawings and photos are useful; but ignore the so-called historical notes. A number of the projects are reconstructions of reconstructions, so there are many leaps of faith that the design is authentic. For accurate information on period furniture joinery, decoration, etc., see Victor Chinnery's book "Oak Furniture, the British Tradition." For information on how to build furniture using hand tools in a period fashion, see Roy Underhill's "Woodwright" series of books.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Charles Gadda on September 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book has the same strengths and weaknesses as the first one - take a look at my review on that as it is applicable here as well. This second book does add some excellent colour photos, a feature lacking in the first volume and much appreciated here.

Again, the point of this book and its predecessor was primarily to provide plans and simple, straightforward, practical instruction on actual furniture construction, nothing more. The expectations demanded by "A Customer" are rather unrealistic, and in any event irrelevant to the purpose of this book.

Look at it this way: if you want to have clear, concise direction on making ~80-90% accurate period furniture then this book along with the first volume will get you there. If, on the other hand, you are expecting to learn how to: identify the proper genus of wood, cut it down and split it into timbers using period tools, smelt bog ore into wrought iron and hand hammer on an authentic charcoal forge into period correct nails, forge your own period accurate chisels, planes, etc., make your own boar bristle paint brush, mix authentic pigments for precisely correct paints.... well, then, I guess these books will fall short of your expectations (and those of "A Customer" and the fifty uptight authenticity Nazis that marched in goosestep agreement with him.). If you can possibly manage to bring such lunatic expectations down to Earth (from, apparently, somewhere outside of Pluto's orbit) then even those who want to go for greater accuracy will nevertheless find much useful information within the covers of these books.

Seriously, with any kind of period reconstruction project there is no such thing as a "one shop stop" for *all* of the information you need.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By PADDY on January 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
I think this is a good book for someone who is interested in the medieval gendra.It may not be the best woodworking manuel but it gives a good overview of the furniture and its construction .Anyone with enthusiasm and access to a workshop can reproduce this rough one off type of furniture.The beauty of everything in the medieval world is that everything is a unique piece.I believe this book will help the experianced and the novice woodworker by giving them a starting point to produce their own unique furniture.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sven Skildbiter on June 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
The second book in the series this one again simply sets out how to make are beautiful array of wooden Medieval furniture, including information on; how to make all the fittings, carving and finishes, all the dimensions and instructions on how to put the furniture together.

I make furniture in my spare time and having a book like this is a boon.

Only problem the measurements are in empiral, luckily I am old enough to know what they mean let alone how to use them.
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