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79 of 84 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Utterly Consuming
I picked up Medieval II Total War / Total War Kingdoms Gold Pack for $30 and I have to say, for that price it's a great deal. There are months of gameplay packed into this game. I was up until 4am, 4 nights in a row!

Concept: 9/10
In Medieval 2GP, you play as 1 of 17 different Factions / Nations in an attempt to use diplomacy, treachery, and military...
Published on April 7, 2009 by Poisoned Blade

versus
19 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars NEW AND SHINY (nothing else)
As someone who has played previous games in the Total war series i must say that nothing new is to be expected from this game. Its offers new factions and some cool units plus the usual backround info they give that gives you a nice insight to what weapons they used back in the medieval to early Renaissance periods.

Its requires some beefy requirements to play...
Published on July 17, 2008 by Sarva Lal


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79 of 84 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Utterly Consuming, April 7, 2009
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
I picked up Medieval II Total War / Total War Kingdoms Gold Pack for $30 and I have to say, for that price it's a great deal. There are months of gameplay packed into this game. I was up until 4am, 4 nights in a row!

Concept: 9/10
In Medieval 2GP, you play as 1 of 17 different Factions / Nations in an attempt to use diplomacy, treachery, and military might to take over the world. The game features a Battle Mode where you can fight a Battle against AI, a Short Campaign where you must wipe out 1 or 2 rival nations and occupy a good portion of the world map, or a Grand Campaign, where you must occupy Jerusalem and a very large portion of the world. The "Short" Campaign could take you anywhere from 8 - 40 hours to finish. With the expansions, there are more maps, 13 more Factions, and 110 more military units... There is also a dedicated Modding community that has further enhanced the game.

Graphics: 8/10
The graphics are impressive on the high settings and it's pretty incredible to watch 4000 soldiers clash on the battlefield with arrows raining from the sky and catapults destroying fully destructible cities.
NOTE: I had an awful time getting my NVidia 7900GT to work with this game, but I finally found the solution on a forum. Creative Assembly's and SEGA's websites were less helpful than a Magic 8 Ball. I'll post the solution in the Comments Section below.

Gameplay: 7/10
There are three types of gameplay in the game. There is a World Map where you can move armies and units across a battlefield and into enemy territories. You strategically use diplomats, merchants, religious figures, spies, assassins, princesses, and armies to thwart your opposing nations. This plays out like old school RISK.

There is faction management, where you govern your cities, raise or lower taxes, build structures that provide troops and upgrades for your army, balance your budget, put your leaders in the most optimal places, and assemble your armies. Your Heirs, Commanders, and Governors have stats... some make great generals, some make great governors. It's up to you to put them in the right places. If you have a brother in-law who is a weak commander and not very loyal, you can send him off to fight the Mongols Far Far away from your homeland. Think of it as chlorine in your family gene pool. You don't want his offspring inheriting your kingdom.

There are the battles. The battles are fought between units in an RTS, rock, paper, scissors, type of battle. Archers are great at long range, Horsemen can run over the archers, spearmen can set themselves in a defensive formation and impale a cavalry charge. There are also infantry (swordsmen) who fare well against the spearmen. There are literally hundreds of different types of units. There are open field battles in different types of environments, mountains, snow, forests...
There are castle sieges where you must use catapults, rams, ladders, siege towers, to take over a walled city. And there are castle sieges where you must defend your city from invaders. During a battle, you can also pause the action and issue commands, or speed it up 2x - 6x so you don't have to wait for the troops to get into position.

If you want to play the game RISK style, you can have the AI simulate the battles and get a results screen that says something like: Victory, you lost 200 men, the enemy lost 650 men.
If you want to play the game like an RTS, you can have the AI govern your cities, while you fight the battles. It was a great idea to cater the game to both styles of play.

Strategies: 8/10
The AI is pretty simple in the game, and once you figure out how to play, you will rarely lose a battle. You can use units and the terrain to your advantage. Unlike Starcraft, you don't have to kill every enemy on the battlefield. You can break their morale and get them to run away. If you see a bunch of enemy swordsmen, you can pepper them with arrows and kill half of them as they are charging, then run them down (literally) with heavy calvary. The game displays their morale and you can see when they are about to break. When they flee, you can let them retreat, or run them down to finish them off.

On the World Map, you can hide your armies in the woods to ambush enemies, or position them in choke points to halt enemy advances. If you are at war with another Christian Faction, the Pope may order you to cease fire for a few turns, which usually allows the enemy to regroup and counterattack. But you can actually destroy an enemy city without attacking it. Send spies, and assassins to take out the governor, kill the militia, and the citizens could riot and rebel against their king. If you have a charming princess, you can marry an enemy general into your family, stealing their army... or you can send diplomats to negotiate with your enemy and harm their economy. There are many ways to topple an enemy town. You can even form an alliance with another nation, and use spies and assassins on them if you don't get caught. If they declare war on you, the Pope may excommunicate them for violating the alliance, or even launch a Holy Crusade against them! How you conquer your enemies is completely up to you.

Interface Screens: 5/10
Switching screens to manage your cities is pretty clunky and it seems that you have to click to 3 different screens to gather information before you make a decision. This gets a little irritating after a while because it feels like everything is 3 clicks away, when it should be 1 click. For example, after a battle, if you decide to execute your Prisoners of war, a box appears on the far left of the screen. Left Click on the Box and it says, "Your Commander has +1 Dread" - right click to close the box. Now find your commander on the battle map, left click on him, then double right click to bring up his stats to see how much Dread he actually has and what it means. It would have been great if that first window showed my all of my commander's stats and his location.

Issues: Diplomacy. Diplomatic Negotiations are pretty broken in the game. It feels like a die roll, instead of strategy. You may ask another nation for Map Information and offer 200 gold. They may refuse and GIVE YOU 1000 GOLD. The game would have been much better if the Map Information cost X, and you had to negotiate to get X down.

Overall: 8/10
Learning the World Map and Battle Strategies is great fun and feels rewarding, but the limited AI and clunky interface keep the game from being GREAT!

The game is rated T for Alcohol References, Blood, Mild Language, a bit of innuendo, and Violence in the form of large scale battles.

Buy it cheap if you want months of light strategy and epic battles.

If you're looking for a Starcraft Killer, you should probably keep looking.
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66 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Grandest of Strategy games, April 17, 2008
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
How many games do you know where your political machinations include plotting the assassination of the Pope so as to be able to elect a pontiff more favorable to your own faction? It's not just because the in-battle graphics are the best you've ever seen in any strategy game, it's not that you can influence the life course of your individual family members by the kinds of actions they take in of off the battlefield, it's not that you can become an economic powerhouse by deploying an army of merchants to conquer markets and put competing merchants out of business for good, what makes this game truly grand is the diplomatic warfare in which all of this is shrouded.

Military might is important, but not necessarily primordial. Have a giant, all-engulfing, land-hungry neighbor that threatens your national security? No problem. Assassinate the current Pope, elect one that's favorable to you and not so much to him, find a way to get him to be excommunicated and ask the pope to call a crusade against him! Now you'll have five or more other factions attack him in the name of Holy religion and he'll be weaker as a result. You may even manage to expand your borders in the bargain.

Now, you may just be one of these people for whom this will be insufficient. Maybe the 21 different playable factions don't quite do it for you. Maybe the different roles your agents (priests, assassins, spies, diplomats/princesses, and merchants) can play don't impress you. Maybe you don't care much for the guilds that offer to quarter themselves into your cities. This is where the Kingdom campaigns come in. All of them are beautiful mods of the original game with a variety of interesting twists. But even without the expansion, this game is worth buying. This said, allow me one warning: stay away from this game if you are addiction-prone.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most fun computer game I have owned in a long time..., April 10, 2009
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
I have recently bought this game off Amazon and have been very, very impressed with it. The only word of caution I have would be to invest in a higher quality graphics card if you are looking into this game, plus the memory requirments are steep.

I have bought all the previous Total War games, and got sick of Rome:Total War after 4 years of playing, much to my wife's disgust and nagging, and decided to buy Medieval Total War 2:Kingdoms, to bug her that much more. :)

My overall expereince is very impressed. Graphics are great, battles are much harder then Rome: Total War, Politics and Religion actually play a large part. Different from Rome and the other previous Total War games, you have to please not only your own nobles, but have to make the Pope happy, usually by not attacking other Catholic Christian factions. If not, you incure the wrath of the Church and can become excommunicated, then all havoc breaks loose on you for different Catholic factions as well.

To me it seems that Medieval Total War 2 is a combination of all the previous Total War games into one. The cool assination video from Shogun Total War, the ransoming of captured prisoners and depth of troop types from Medieval Total War 1, and the stunning graphics and map (not like a Risk board but actually holding mountain passes or hiding in forests to ambush unsuspecting armies)of Rome Total War.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, February 22, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Medieval II: Total War - Gold Edition [Download] (Software Download)
Read any review from a credible source and you'll see great scores.
Medieval II is a fantastic game. I believe that the "Risk" portion of
the game is actually more fun than the giant battles. Enjoy a wonderful game!

PS. This game works on windows 7 64bit.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This series never dissapoints me, April 16, 2012
By 
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
I've spent more time in this Total War then any others that I own. I bought it along with Shogun 2 thinking I'd be playing that one more and only be playing Medieval 2 when I get bored of Shogun. Turns out to be the other way around (might have to do with the fact that Medieval doesn't use Steam). I've only had the courage of doing a few attempts at the campaign (it seems a little daunting at first, lots of stuff to do and manage). Let me share with all of you my experiences.

I've played as England, Portugal, Spain, and The Holy Roman Empire briefly. It wasn't until I played the Scottish campaign in the Britannia Expansion that I really got into the campaigns. Until then I was only playing custom, quick, and historical battles. Anyways, it was maybe 20 or so turns into the campaign. The Vikings invade my northernmost castle (I originally tried to ally them to deal with England) and I found myself facing a horde of 3000 led by their faction leader against my meager 1000 (mostly low-end peasants and highland rabble). I couldn't reinforce so I had no other choice than to sally forth and hold the Vikings at bay or my best general (at the time) would die trying. Needless to say that battle was the most incredible moment I've had in any RTS I've ever played (possibly even all my gaming experience). Their army was completely demolished and their entire faction was obliterated with that single defense. This was also the first time that I got caught off guard by any AI. Normally in a siege they focus everyone to attack the front of the castle at roughly the same time (unless siege weapons are involved). During this battle though, they sent a very small force of their 3000 straight to the gates. Then they split up the remaining army in two. One snuck left and behind my castle then to the front (while hugging the wall) and the other did the same but opposite direction. I did not notice this as I was busy frantically trying to stop the advancing ladders and rams. After I beat them I ordered everyone out to chase them down. It was at this moment those two larger chunks of their army finally finished circling and cut me off from my own castle. It was then a frantic race to head them off before they could mow us down in the open field and capture the castle center.

That above experience alone should be enough to intrigue you to pick this up and play through one of the many campaigns. Now, I know that doesn't always happen. I'm sure it isn't common. However, it is nice to know the AI can mix things up and try new strategies every now and then. That one in particular almost worked had I not looked to the mini-map and then notice to my horror the vast amount of red that was all over the castle.

So... That was one story of my Kingdom. What story will yours have? Pick this game up and find out.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great game, but not without some slight caveats, January 3, 2012
This review is from: Medieval II: Total War - Gold Edition [Download] (Software Download)
I will break down this review into five parts:
(It will be quite a lengthy review, just a heads up, but I believe that this will be enough for most to make a decision for purchase)
1) Introduction/Snappy review
2) Turn-Based Gameplay
3) RTS Gameplay
4) Expansion Packs
5) Conclusion

1) Medieval II: Total War (hitherto referred to as MTW2) is a game which allows the play to take command of various European powers circa 1080 to about 1500. These powers include England, France, Holy Roman Empire (ironically it was neither Holy, nor Roman, nor an Empire), Spain, Portugal, Denmark, Poland, Hungary, Russia, Venice, Milan, Sicily, Byzantine Empire, Turkey, Moors and Egypt. The unplayable factions are the Papal States, the Mongols, the Timurids (basically Mongol invasion with Elephants which comes later in the game), and the Aztecs. MTW2 is a refreshing blend of turn-based strategy and real-time battles to form an empire midst the chaos of the Middle Ages. In the turn-based portion, one can conduct diplomacy, move armies, govern cities, build forts and watchtowers, and prepare for war. When two armies meet, the player has the ability to control the troop movements to achieve victory, with corpses littering the battlefield, only reinforcing the bloody path of the player to victory. It is very enjoyable to watch two armies face. This is not a game which can be played in one sitting, but rather, needs constant attention over the course of days, if not weeks. Some bugs plague the game, but they do not detract too severely from the game, which fully deserves its 9/10
2) In MTW2, the turn-based gameplay is where the core of the game takes place. Perhaps as a first step, one must cover cities vs. castles. A city allows trade to flourish, and these are the economic centers of one's realm. They bring in large numbers of revenue, and cap at around 7000 (this was reached by a fully upgraded, so to speak, Antioch). The downside is the fact that they are not as easy to defend as castles, as there is only one layer of defenses, as well as the best trained units cannot be bought here, with the exception of some beginning knight units (I am not considering Mailed Knights and Feudal Knights as "Knight" units - that honor goes to units like Polish Guard or Knights, Chivalric Knights, English Knights, etc., which are vastly superior to Mailed and Feudal Knights.). These beginning "knights" units such as the French Gendrames and Polish and Hungarian Hussars are valuable troops, and are only trained in the cities. Losing a city means decreased revenue and potential bankruptcy due to lack of funds. Castles, on the other hand, do not bring in as much revenue and cap at around 2500. Here, one can hire the best-trained units available to each power, and are much easier to defend than cities, especially citadels, which allows for a three-layer defense. Losing a castle means slightly decreased revenue, but the worst is decreased military capability, which can hurt in the long run. This is an enjoyable change, as it brings a sort of a dualism into the map - no longer is one simply training units in strongholds or only in cities, but in both, each with its own distinct advantages. This is a welcome addition to the series. Secondly, agents will be covered. There are six types of agents, Diplomats, Princesses, Spies, Assassins, Merchants, and Priests/Bishops/Cardinals/Imams. Diplomats let the player engage in diplomatic relations with other powers to forge alliances, trade rights, marriages, seek help in a war, peace treaties, map information, payment, tributes, etc. In general, the diplomacy system is rather sound, but there are some rather grievous errors. Upon enacting diplomacy, I decided to have an alliance and trade rights, and I was going to pay 1500 to sweeten the deal. They declined, and decided to pay ME 1500. However nice it is to get more money, should not they accept when I was the one paying? The alliance system is also rather misguided. I enacted an alliance with a country much weaker than me (I was waging war elsewhere), and three turns later, they break the treaty by blocking a PORT.... Let us just say that they did not last long. I find this to detract from the overall feel of the game - why is it that an enemy would do this, knowing that there was no chance of victory? It is a problem that has plagued the series, and I am unhappy that it still has not been fixed, so -.5 here. This is probably among the greatest of my contentions against the game. Princesses can also engage in diplomatic relations, but can also marry enemy generals, thereby bringing the generals to one's side. The negative is that fact that your princesses do not really show up all that often, so it is rather rare to experience such enacted marriages. Spies spy, assassins assassinate enemy generals, cardinals, or if necessary, the pope himself. Priests and Imams convert populations to their respective religions, thereby decreasing or increasing public content. Merchants allow for increased revenue, but there are not many places in which it is actually very helpful (slaves around Kiev and Caffa, Mines around Vienna, Ivory and Gold in Timbuktu - by far the best place for Merchants to expand, gold and ivory in Dongola, and the silk around Constantinople and Nicaea; other than that, nothing else is really worth it). The agents allow for various things to happen, and I am very happy with how things play out - large check here. City management is OK, but after getting the largest cities, squalor levels become rather unbearable, making one wish for the Black Plague (and it does come, and kills not only citizens, but your agents and generals). Adopting new generals is rather annoying, because they either spawn in your capital or with a faction leader or heir and then take a long time to send to the frontlines. I don't have too much of a problem with this because I can't find an alternative - it would seem silly to adopt someone and then choose where to have him spawn - that would destroy the realism. Moving armies is fine and the ability to build watchtowers and forts is really nice. I think that that is enough here.
3) When two armies meet, the player has the ability to auto-resolve, fight on the battle map, or withdraw. Assuming one fights one the battle map, one first has to set up troops in wanted locations. While this is usually a painless process, glitches exist; mainly the fact that after dragging a formation, and seeing the proper formation and letting go of the mouse to have the formation there, it never materializes, even though there is nothing blocking the path there. Annoying, but manageable. The AI fights as well as it can, but do not expect much of a challenge after about 5 hours of gameplay - then, one can take on very large armies and come out victorious with small losses. I routinely fight about 2000 on 2000 on very hard, usually losing less than 400 troops, while the other army was fully vanquished. The corpse-strewn battlefield is a nice touch - a reminder of the player's bloody path to global domination. The soldiers fight, and it is breathtaking to watch them stab, hack, and parry incoming blows, and absolutely disheartening when your General gets killed by a luck axe from a woodsmen (yes I had that happen - charged head-on, and completely destroyed the enemy unit, killing ¾, while myself losing one - my general... '). This is a game from 2006, but I wish that it was slightly more realistic up-close. While they do fight, there are times where there seems to be no contact, but a unit recoils as if struck. Also, the enemy AI sometimes stands still while being hacked by enemy troops, rather than fighting. These are not major contentions, but they detract enough from the gameplay to warrant a loss of .5. As a side-note, I am not happy with the "historical battles." The numbers are rather erroneous, and even the parties taken in them are flawed (e.g. Battle of Grunewald / First Battle of Tannenberg saw allied Poles and Lithuanians against the Teutonic Knights - in the game, it is just the Poles vs. the Holy Roman Empire). Since I don't play these (a)historical battles, I did not bother meriting a loss of points.
4) The expansion packs allow for the player to assume more roles as various factions in various continents (Teutonic Knights, HRE, Poland, Lithuania, and Novgorod in Teutonic campaign; Turks, Egyptians, Byzantines, Principalities of Antioch and Jerusalem in Crusades campaign; England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Denmark, Baron's Alliance in Britannia campaign; Aztecs, Mayans, Indians, Spanish Conquistadors in the American campaign). This is enough to keep even the most die-hard fans busy for a while. The hardest I would say is Britannia, especially as England - there is too much to be done and too little time. The easiest is probably the Teutonic - money flows nicely and no giant armies to surprise one as they show up in Crusades. The gameplay is similar to the aforementioned, just more focused, which I like. It is worth the $1 over the original game to get.
5) Overall, this is a highly recommended game for anyone with an interest in Medieval warfare and global domination. Get it now!

Pros:
-Great gameplay
-AI plays OK
-Fun and Immersing
-Beauty to watch the battles
-Need to think (at least for me this is a pro)

Cons:
-Diplomacy system still needs work
-AI plays OK (random general kamikaze charge into a spearwall....)
-Allies treat you like trash
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some improvements over Rome, January 30, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Medieval II: Total War - Gold Edition [Download] (Software Download)
As a long-time TW:Rome fan, I was a little slow to get around to purchasing this. Medieval II closely resembles Rome, but offers several improvements in game play. The improvement in graphics is subtle, but nonetheless noticeable. My favorite feature is that you can queue up unit and building purchases even if you lack funds in your current turn. This reduces the time spent on micromanaging your cities. The strategy element is also more nuanced - with priests, merchants, princesses, the pope, crusades, and of course spies and diplomats. Dealing with the Pope is especially enjoyable (or sometimes dangerous). I also enjoy using early gunpowder - it adds a new element, particularly to siege warfare, yet without being totally dominant.

The game has been very stable. The only drawback, in my opinion, is that it lacks the variety of cultures and units that Rome had. This homogeneity of cultures is not a problem as such (it is more historically accurate that different Medieval civilizations utilized the same tactics, especially a heavier emphasis on cavalry). Nonetheless, it gets to be kind of the same thing a little quicker, because you're using essentially the same kinds of units and tactics against everyone you conquer, especially in the West. It just doesn't have the vast differences that Rome had between the Gauls, the Greeks, the Romans, the Parthians, Carthaginians, the Thracians, the Egyptians, etc..., who each had very unique armies. This is somewhat ameliorated in the Americas campaign, which features the unique Aztecs and the Mayans, but fighting against them seems like cheating. They suffer from the plague, they have no cavalry, no siege equipment to speak of, no navy or ports to blockade, and generally just have to rely upon numbers against the Spanish. So yet again, its historically accurate, but not necessarily the best game play. The battles of Medieval II also seem to take a bit longer, perhaps because the heavier armor provides more protection than most units in Rome.

These are all minor quibbles though. The game is very enjoyable.
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars NEW AND SHINY (nothing else), July 17, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
As someone who has played previous games in the Total war series i must say that nothing new is to be expected from this game. Its offers new factions and some cool units plus the usual backround info they give that gives you a nice insight to what weapons they used back in the medieval to early Renaissance periods.

Its requires some beefy requirements to play it properly because you just cant play the game on super low settings. I would recommend having at least a 7800GT to play this game 1.5 Gigs of RAM and 2.8ghz processor dual core is better than single because this game supports multi-threading.

The multiplayer is not worth your time in my opinion its just not fun and not meant for a Strategy Game.

I give this game a 10 for graphics/audio 6 for interface but a 4 for creativity. They did nothing to improve the game its the same as ever but it will still entertain for hours.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid replay value!, October 26, 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
One of the ways I know I like a game is if I keep thinking about it, after I have "beaten" the game. There are games of all genres that have sparked this re-occurring interest in me. I wish I could still play the classic Risk video game that I had on my Macintosh SE, as well as that original version of Tetris.

Medieval II is a continuation of the Total War series, and the best in my opinion, because it does not require a Steam account or other radical DRM to enjoy. I have a home gaming system that is not hooked up to the internet for safety reasons, since it is a windows machine. I prefer to do my home internet viewing on a Linux type machine to reduce my chances of collecting a virus or Trojan.

The second reason Medieval II is so good is because of its immense replay value. The game has so many missions, options, and tweaks you are able to make each campaign "new" and fun. That is just for starters - then you find out there is a huge modding community for this game. There are easily thirty mods for this game to keep it interesting. I have only explored two of them so far, but they have been a blast.

This game runs very stably and faster than Rome Total War, even with the same machine. The AI is better, and the overall game is more involved. Quite fun, I have been playing this game for more than six months.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Medieval 2 Total War (Gold Edition) Review, Is It Worth It???, April 17, 2010
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Ahh, yes, the Medieval age a time for strong fortified castles to dot the landscape through Europe and the Middle East (and northern parts of Africa)and huge cities to be plaged by The Great Death and more important a time for Total War.
This game takes you too the middle ages of history. You choose from over 10 possible playable kingdoms from England to Egypt. Your goal? Total and utter domination!Rule your land through diplomacy, treachery, and beyond all war. You as the supervising general for all armies. Your hand can play major roles in your quest for domination when you attack and choose to play the battle in question on the battlefield. Or put your armies under AI control and let them do your dirty work, there are more than willing.
Medieval II: Total War was a game that caught my interest from playing Para World on my computer I knew that I liked controling an army and building magnificent cities. However Total War is MUCH better than Para World.
I've played Medieval II Total ALOT! I've been just about all the playable kingdoms there is to be and still find it a fun game.
The graphics in the game a spectacular and keeps the Total War 'flavor' (as I like to call it)It did start a little rough on my computer but with a few compromises I got it working slick. The cities and castles in the game are also magnificent in the game, much, much detail. And I liked that you have different units within castles, which you can have many or few (I'd only go with a few castles on the outskirts of your enemy's kingdom. if you have to many you won't be able to get alot in taxes. and iff you are in need of taxes you can allways convert your castle into a city.)

The over-all of this game is Awesome! A verry good buy and well worth the money there is nothing bad about this game. Other than the two things I noted on, but those are really, really minuscule compaired to how great the game is.

Medieval II: Total War Gold Edition is the actual Medieval II game with the exspansion packs with it (America's,Britannia,Crusades, and Tuetonic)The exspansion packs are good but are more in-depth in the certain area and the Battle map is on a smaller more personal scale on the indivusual packs. They rate just like Medieval II: Total War. Verry, verry good games.

JRF01...
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