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Meditations on Hunting Hardcover – August 1, 2007


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Hardcover, August 1, 2007
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 140 pages
  • Publisher: Wilderness Adventures Press; 2nd edition (August 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932098534
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932098532
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 7.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #115,625 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth D. Gartrell on August 7, 2008
This is an excellent book which details the Ortega y. Gasset philosophy of hunting. It is surprising how little reader interest there is in the book. I would consider it a must read for those who still hunt.

Ortega y. Gasset bases his thinking on a combination of anthropology, history and natural sciences. The basic idea is that hunting is an ancient occupation of man, it is part of the definition of man's place in nature and it is ingrained into the genetic code of all of us.

In this way, Ortega y. Gasset reveals that by hunting, people fulfill their biological imperatives, realize their ability to transcend time and find their primitive being which predates recorded history.

The work is primarily a philosophical justification of hunting. I believe Ortega y. Gasset proves his point convincingly. However, that hardly matters because his analysis certainly evokes the right question which is, "Why do we hunt?"
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jorge F. Garcia on May 4, 2010
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Thought-provoking and well written. But be warned, O&G has an odd way of dealing with his subject matter. Sometimes he seems to skirt the title of a chapter altogether. For example, one of the early chapters simply expounds at length upon the "credentials" of two early hunters (a Greek and a Roman). To what end? The gist of the chapter seems to be that if two very solid historical figures both liked hunting, that ought to be good enough for us. Hm. The chapter titled The Ethics of Hunting seems to say - as best as I could decipher it - that the ethical questions that underlie the matter are way too deep, tangled and just plain incomprehensible to even talk about. Philosophically, this can be a frustrating read sometimes. Still, what isn't? Like I said, the book does not fail to be well written and thought-provoking even though it asks more questions than it answers. If you are comfortable reading philosophy and you are interested in hunting, don't pass it up.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Vladimir Antimonov on February 10, 2014
It is disheartening to read a book by this charismatic man with outstanding literary abilities, who by the virtue of belonging to the rich class enjoyed multiple privileges of such life, attempting to justify not only his desire to continue doing what he likes - hunting and killing animals that is, - but also what is most important for him in this book is to justify hunting being a rational privilege of only those very few (to whom he would unarguably belong) who must be allowed to exercise this "sport" of killing. That is the essence of this book, and it is felt in almost every paragraph.

In the introduction to this book Jose Ortega beautifully states that "Other living beings simply live. Man, on the other hand, is not given the option of simply living; he can and must dedicate himself to living... he must hand over his life... deliberately and under his untransferable responsibility, to specific occupations... When he becomes aware of existence, he finds himself before a terrifying emptiness. He does not know what to do; he himself must invent his own tasks or occupations". And then, after such eloquent and penetrating statement of the existential problem of Man, the rest of the book he dedicates to explaining why one of such specific occupations for the privileged men should be killing those other beings who "simply live"! As if indeed in the mid of the 20th century there were no more joyful and fulfilling occupations which could have been recommended instead by a renowned philosopher!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Primo Rodriguez Perez on December 18, 2012
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Ortega y Gasset takes one in a philosophical journey into the art of huntiing. He is very serious when it comes to taking game,and views the practice from a very intelligent perspective. The book promotes selectiveness, and sportsmanship over ego. The true hunter is a gentelman. His take on stalking is artistic and scientific. Read this book and you will enjoy the outdoors even if you come back empty handed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Ives on March 14, 2013
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This is not a "how to" book on hunting, it is a classic study of "why" people hunt. This philosophical treatise was written in 1942 in Lisbon, Spain, and has been cited frequently over the years.

It is not an easy read, in that to appreciate what the author is presenting, one must give it some thought. The value to me is this requirement for contemplation.

This hardcover printing, with dust cover, is nicely produced on quality paper complete with etchings and footnotes. The only quibble I have is the font size on the footnotes can be a strain for older eyes...

If you hunt or want to better understand hunting, I highly recommend this book.
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