Start reading Meditations (Dover Thrift Editions) on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available
 

Meditations (Dover Thrift Editions) [Kindle Edition]

Marcus Aurelius
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (272 customer reviews)

Digital List Price: $3.00 What's this?
Print List Price: $3.00
Kindle Price: $0.95
You Save: $2.05 (68%)

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $0.99  
Kindle Edition, February 2, 2012 $0.95  
Paperback $1.00  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $16.95 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
Featured Ancient History Books
Browse books on Greek society, the Roman empire, mythology, and more. Learn more

Book Description

Stirring reflections on the human condition from a warrior and emperor provide a fascinating glimpse into the mind and personality of a highly principled Roman of the 2nd century. Recognizing that suffering is at the core of life, he counsels stoic detachment in the face of inevitable pain, loss and death.


Editorial Reviews

Review

Martin Hammond's translation of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, like his Iliad and Odyssey, is the work of an unusually gifted translator, and one who understands the value added by careful attention to supplementary material. He writes natural English, direct and often eloquent; the text is well supported by effective notes and a characteristically thorough and well-planned index; Diskin Clay supplies a useful introduction. This is a fine volume -- Malcolm Heath Greece & Rome Journal Marcus is well served by this new translation. Hammond has a pithy turn of phrase to match the emperor's own ... His notes abound in helpful explanation and illuminating cross-reference. Diskin Clay contributes a sparkling and sympathetic introduction. The combination of introduction, translation and notes is as good as they get -- John Taylor Journal of Classics Teaching

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Latin

Product Details

  • File Size: 962 KB
  • Print Length: 114 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (February 2, 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008TVLRU4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #149,927 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
207 of 212 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book of practical philosophy ever written December 1, 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
The style is direct and unpretentious. The message is simple but extraordinarily powerful: life is short, the past and the future are inaccessible, pain and pleasure have no meaning, but inside each one of us there is a ruling faculty that is touched only by itself. Only that which makes us better capable of confronting our condition with resolution and courage can be said to be good, and only that which makes us worse and more unsatisfied can be said to be bad. The only thing that is of any importance is our own private quest for perfection, which no external power can ever destroy. Marcus Aurelius delivers many insightful and inspirational observations about human nature and the human condition, and he makes an excellent rational argument for seeking the good and for acting modestly and continently. I cannot think or a more satifying and moving work, and it is all the more poignant because it was written by a man who wielded almost absolute power and lived surrounded by the luxury, yet managed to keep things in perspective and to occupy himself only with what truly matters. One sentence captures perfectly the spirit of his writings: "Where a man can live, there he can also live well." An extraordinary testimony of wisdom and fortitude.
Was this review helpful to you?
62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a diamond October 5, 2003
Format:Paperback
The Meditations are terse statements, aphorisms, notes, even reminders. Some are like fragmented dialogues, which I find fascinated. Some are very hard to get a hold of. Others remarkably clear. Summarizing them is hard, and surely misleading, but they seem frequently to stand against illusions and mistaken judgments, especially in the face of frustration, desire, fear, and anger. The positive dimension of this is harder to describe (maybe because I have yet to know it firsthand): calmness, purpose, self-control, and a true reckoning of what will matter in the end, as understood in terms of the harmony and essential order of all things. He can be difficult in places, but at other times it is as though he sees into your soul.
I think Marcus Aurelius will strike readers very differently based on where they are coming from. Some readers will resonate with his insistence on self-awareness, equanimity, and responsibility for one's own mental state and reactions. Other readers will be attracted by his ethical standards, commitment to the common good, and sense of divine harmony in all events. Others will simply enjoy his sobering reflection and insightful commentary on human nature. Historians will be fascinated with a look into the mind of a Roman emperor, seemingly untouched by the affairs of state (they are hardly mentioned in the text). Philosophers will enjoy learning about Stoic thought in praxis and how he's picked up the thought of other Greek thinkers (Epictetus, Chrysippus, Heraclitus, etc). Perhaps one of the most amazing things is how he might appeal equally to readers from very different backgrounds, a testament to the complexity of his thinking.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
67 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Read reviews carefully November 5, 2006
Format:Paperback
Amazon has not done a good job sorting out the various editions and translations of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. As a result, comments with many stars actually may be referring to an entirely different translation. Likewise, hardbound references don't match up with the paperback versions. I'd recommend that you find a copy somewhere and look at the text yourself before you order.
Was this review helpful to you?
80 of 88 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ian Myles Slater on: The Modern Library and the Emperor November 10, 2004
Format:Paperback
It was interesting to see that one reviewer went looking for a copy of the Modern Library edition of "Meditations" as a gift, and had to settle for a different translation.

There was a time when many publishers had in print their own editions -- usually "gift editions," in a range of prices -- of the little book, "To Himself," by the second-century Roman patrician Marcus Annius Catilius Severus (121-180 C.E.), known after his marriage as Marcus Annius Verus -- almost always titled something like "The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius," and most commonly some version (little choice disguised as many choices) of George Long's 1862 translation of the Greek original, originally published as "The Thoughts of the Emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus."

For Marcus, besides receiving an excellent education in Greek, which he seems to have used as naturally as Latin, went on, through a process of adoption and co-optation, to rule the Roman Empire, beginning in 161 with the death of Antoninus Pius, his uncle, who had adopted him as heir, using a third version of his name. For moderns, he is usually just Marcus Aurelius; I found it a bit of shock to see him as just another "Antoninus" in ancient texts.

Under any name, he has been popular, at least with publishers; even now, there seem to be something like sixty versions in English of this book available on Amazon, even though many *are* out of print (and most seem to be of the same few older translations). As usual, a number of these editions and translations are grouped by Amazon for review purposes, and I will mention some. If you find this, or someone else's, review of one translation under a different heading, PLEASE remember that, as Marcus Aurelius saw, some things really are beyond our control.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Great read.
Published 1 day ago by Rodrigo Camargo
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great read
Love this book, a great mind. Someone I had never heard of until I watched "Black Sails."
Published 7 days ago by Sharon Trujillo
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Excellent read with a lot of insightful passages
Published 8 days ago by Gabe Alcantar-Lopez
5.0 out of 5 stars ... purchasing this edition of Meditations and have been very pleased....
I did a little research looking at other reviews prior to purchasing this edition of Meditations and have been very pleased. Read more
Published 9 days ago by Alexis S
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't waste your money
Don't waste your money, even though it's already freaking cheap. Buy a better one, and you will have the mood to read.
Published 13 days ago by Man Zhao
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
One to the best of many editions of Marcus Aurelius's Mediation - everyone should have a copy.
Published 14 days ago by Billie-Boy
5.0 out of 5 stars THE BOOK IS HARD TO EXPLAIN IF YOU ARE NOT ...
THE BOOK IS HARD TO EXPLAIN IF YOU ARE NOT AWARE OF THE STOICS OR THEIR DOCTRINES. READ UP ON THE STOICS AND PURCHASE MEDITATIONS. IT WILL BE WELL WORTH THE EFFORT.
Published 16 days ago by Gary Robinson
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it, then re-read it
I wish I had of read this book 30 years ago. But then again, I wouldnt have read it 30 years ago. Read this book, then re-read it, then read a passage everyday and let the messages... Read more
Published 21 days ago by Maurice Nistico
5.0 out of 5 stars Stoic philosophy - own guidance and self-improvement
Marcus Aurelius (roman empror 161-180),
who is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosphers,
the book "Meditations" is one the gems of Marcus'... Read more
Published 21 days ago by vickey martin
4.0 out of 5 stars Best work in Stoicism
The Meditations is a philosophical potpourri of paragraphs by the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius (AD 121-180). Read more
Published 22 days ago by Joseph M. Reninger
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category