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Medusa (Kurt Austin, Bk 8) Mass Market Paperback – May 25, 2010


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Medusa (Kurt Austin, Bk 8) + Lost City (The Numa Files) + Polar Shift (The Numa Files)
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley; Reprint edition (May 25, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425235092
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425235096
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 4.1 x 7.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,960 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the prologue to the winning eighth Kurt Austin adventure from bestseller Cussler and Shamus-winner Kemprecos (after The Navigator), 18-year-old Caleb Nye, a farm boy on his first sea voyage in 1848, finds himself a modern-day Jonah after being swallowed by a whale and then cut from the stomach, alive but forever changed. In the present, a Russian captain sees his Typhoon-class submarine sold to an unknown buyer, and in China, Dr. Song Lee, who's been banished to the countryside, gets orders to return to Beijing to fight a deadly SARS epidemic. Meanwhile, off Bermuda, Kurt Austin and the stalwart crew of the National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA) lower a bathysphere to the ocean depths, where something big snaps the cables connecting the vessel to the mother ship. Soon enough, the disparate plot lines converge in an action-packed tale that snags readers and drags them racing through heavy seas and high drama. 600,000 first printing.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Kurt Austin must stop a deadly virus from decimating the world in the latest NUMA Files novel. Research using a newly discovered jellyfish shows promising results, but before the tests even start, scientists studying these Blue Medusas start dying. As the pandemic threatens to spread through China, the NUMA team realizes that a Chinese triad is behind the outbreak. Now in their eighth adventure, Austin and partner Zavala are becoming almost as entertaining as Dirk Pitt and his gang. Some clunky dialogue and an ending right out of a Scooby Doo cartoon hurt a bit, but Cussler fans will stick around for the action. --Jeff Ayers --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The usual Cussler fast pace action.
Robert N. Reid
Beginning with 'The Navigator' I noticed a distinct lack of...well, I can't exactly put my finger on it, and THAT kinda drives me a bit nuts to be honest.
Jeff Edwards
I always look forward to the next Clive Cussler book.
Robert C. Douglas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 73 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Edwards VINE VOICE on June 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
As a HUGE Cussler fan, I've spent what seems like years in a mode of 'waiting 'til his next book came out'...and then something strange happened: he began writing different series. And then it became clear after a bit that all of the co-authors were the ACTUAL writers, to which Clive came up with story outlines and had the co-author actually pen the novels. At first Paul Kemprecos was brilliant--and by that I mean he mirrored Cussler's style and more importantly his *formula* to a Tee. Take ANY of the first 4 NUMA Files novels and exchange Kurt with Dirk, and Joe with Al and voila! you have a regular Dirk Pitt story.

Beginning with 'The Navigator' I noticed a distinct lack of...well, I can't exactly put my finger on it, and THAT kinda drives me a bit nuts to be honest. Something about that book just didn't GRAB me like a normal NUMA Files book usually does. Wish I could be more specific, but I just can't. With 'Medusa' that trend has continued--albeit I have to say I enjoyed it better than 'Navigator'.

As usual, Dirk--uh, I mean Kurt and Co. are in the right place at the right time to avert one disaster, only to get caught up in another, larger global far-reaching disaster much bigger than originally thought. This is the typical Cussler *formula* that has served him so well over the years. Maybe, just MAYBE I'm growing tired of the predictability of it all...? I don't know for certain. I DO plan on buying the next Cussler/Kemprecos NUMA Files book, but I cannot say how long I can be carried along with this same tried-but-true *formula* which unfortunately seems to have seen better days...unlike Kemprecos who tries to mimic Cussler's style, Jack Du Brul who pens the Oregon Files novels doesn't try to write LIKE Cussler at all. He has his own style and you can TELL. The novels seem fresh and entirely different, but at the same time, JUST as exciting and worthwhile.

Time will tell if this trend continues, or whether I'll keep buying or not.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Erik R. Carlseen on June 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I've been a huge fan of Cussler's work for about two decades now. Sadly, the books written "with" other authors (for "by" values of "with") don't live up to his standards. Medusa isn't the worst book I've read in the last year, but I can't bring myself to call it anywhere near good. The plot is a fairly generic "super virus must be stopped!" bit shoehorned into the maritime environment the NUMA heroes live in. There's pretty much no character development, and the "supporting cast" barely does anything. The research is inexcusably bad - stuff that ninety seconds with Google would catch. There's none of the pulpy / campy charm of the Dirk Pitt novels.

If it weren't for Cussler whoring his name out it would probably never be published. As it is, he should be embarrassed to have his name on the cover.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Harmon A. Prives on June 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Having lived in Arizona I have had the pleasure of meeting Clive Cussler at several book signings. Having made that statement I can truly say that I have never picked up one of his works of fiction and said to myself, "Wow, Cussler has a Pulitzer coming his way." On the other hand I've gotten a smattering of education, and I do mean smattering about oceanography and history. Like Clive's other novels, "Medusa" has a formula: bad guys want to take over the world and good guys with NUMA capes come along to stop them. Each chapter is essentially an old time Saturday matinee at the movies cliffhanger. In the end the good guys win just as we want them to do. Just go with the flow and you'll find "Medusa" an enjoyable read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jeannie Mancini VINE VOICE on November 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Although for the past few years I have been staying away from Cussler's books due to the extreme predictability and improbability of his stories, I decided to try again with his new Kurt Austin thriller "Medusa". After seeing the amazing jellyfish at the Monterey Bay Aquarium a few times, the jacket cover of the book pulled me in, allowing me back into Cussler's realm of deepsea action stories. I do agree with other reviewers that it has become apparent of late, that Cussler is outlining the stories and using other co-authors to pen the actual narratives. I felt that with "Medusa" it showed, and I was happier for it.

There was much more substance to this novel and thankfully the action scenes were very realistic, not over-the-top improbable, which made for a much more enjoyable experience. I think that the one ingredient that makes this book more of a hit is that it offers the reader an array of interesting information on a host of topics we might not have known of or realized existed. This plot involves the history of New England whaling, and some very cool high-tech underwater diving and exploration equipment such as deepsea rovers, hard-shell diving suits, submersibles like the original Beebe bathysphere, and Typhoon class submarines. It was also fascinating to learn of the magical islands of Micronesia with it's ruins of the lost primitive city of Nan Madol that I had never heard of. Readers also get an up front and personal, not so picturesque portrait, of the horrors of what a pandemic outbreak of an influenza virus could bring to this world if certain measures are not taken. But the star of Medusa's show however, is how the authors use tropical water jellyfish as an angle that on one hand causes the story's crisis, yet on the other hand will save the day.
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