Customer Reviews


18 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


55 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enter the Authentic Realm of the Good People
A wonderful, potent, enspirited, and true-to-essence treatment of an often misunderstood, misinterpreted, and misrepresented subject: the faery folk. Lenihan is an authentic seanachai (storyteller) in the Irish traditions, but even more he is one who undoubtedly has a profound relationship with the life-affirming powers known as faery. Thanks to Carolyn Eve Green's...
Published on March 25, 2003 by Frank MacEowen

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meeting the Other Crowd
All of these stories about fairies were told to the author by the older generations that are now grandparents. These were stories never written down but told by word of mouth.

There were only a few I really enjoyed. The rest of them seem to tell the same story over and over. A lot of the stories were similar to the last. That being said it is still cool to...
Published on September 24, 2012 by Shannon M. Mcgee


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

55 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enter the Authentic Realm of the Good People, March 25, 2003
A wonderful, potent, enspirited, and true-to-essence treatment of an often misunderstood, misinterpreted, and misrepresented subject: the faery folk. Lenihan is an authentic seanachai (storyteller) in the Irish traditions, but even more he is one who undoubtedly has a profound relationship with the life-affirming powers known as faery. Thanks to Carolyn Eve Green's mastery of the written (and spoken) word, we are invited into the world of Irish story, not as mere tales, but as maps into the Otherworld. In Ireland sacredness is inseparable from story, and story is inseparable from place--both the places named and seen in ordinary reality, and those places that border our world, that are inhabited by intelligent and powerful beings. For those readers who are unfamiliar with the Gaelic visionary traditions and the "co-present dimension of faery" this book will serve as an ample introduction to these enlivened cosmologies. For others who think the faery people are little gossamer-winged sprites, think again. Meeting the Other Crowd takes us into the faery world. Ultimately, this book is a profound contribution to understanding the transpersonal realities of the primal Irish and primal Celtic traditions in general. Where the classic work by W.Y. Evans-Wentz, The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries, was essentially an outsider cataloguing an ethnological record of belief, Meeting the Other Crowd offers us the perspective and perceptions of an insider--a living practitioner who knows quite well that the realm of faery is real, and alive, and capable of initiating the human being into a profound reality of spirit and connection to earth.--...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful bridge ..., June 19, 2004
By 
I read this book straight through, because I couldn't bear to put it down! Mr. Lenihan has a great talent for capturing the ideas and "brogue" of the people he hears stories from, and his reviews of each story really make you think. I found this book to be fascinating, informative, and yet at times chilling. (I certainly wouldn't want to read these stories to my children at bedtime!) It offers a great deal of insight to the lives of the Good People, as well as into the lives of the past Irish, may their knowledge and stories ever be preserved.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reason to believe!, January 28, 2004
Eddie Lenihan is a national treasure of Ireland.
The folklorist is obsessed with the collection and sharing of Ireland's old stories. Realizing that the old ways -- sharing stories over a peat fire or a pint -- are in danger of extinction in modern Ireland, Lenihan moves mountains to find tales before they're lost and forgotten in the wake of television and technology. Meeting the Other Crowd: The Fairy Stories of Hidden Ireland is Lenihan's latest effort to share and preserve those tales.
Worth the cover price alone is Lenihan's lengthy introduction, which discusses Ireland's vanishing oral tradition, as well as ancient and modern perceptions of fairy stories. Ireland may be a player in the international field of the 21st century, but that doesn't mean the people there -- even the younger generation -- discount entirely the lore that forms the bedrock of their society. And maybe, just maybe, there is still good reason to believe....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fairies aren't funny, February 6, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Meeting the Other Crowd (Paperback)
If you think fairies are little winged creatures to amuse children, think again. Lenihan has collected Irish folk tales that show the serious and often the dangerous side of the world of fairy -- a world very much alive in the traditions of Ireland. Not all encounters with the world of fairy lead humans to disaster, but be warned that some of these stories are NOT bedtime reading if you want to sleep well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Testimony of a hidden Ireland about to vanish, September 11, 2004
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Lenihan's prefatory remarks deserve a quote:

Yet I am not so sentimental as to imagine that people can be other than creatures of their time and place. And our time and place is a world, a society that emphasizes the technological rather than the personal (despite what advertisers might have us believe), the superficial and fleeting rather than the profound, the commercial at the expense of the communal. All these changes have their price, and the casualties we can see all around us. (12)

Here, Lenihan speaks for all of us who witness the recent decades that have transformed the physical and spiritual Irish landscapes irrevocably. Lenihan's compilation of oral testimony, mainly gathered from the region, witnesses a less manicured environment. There, ringforts survive as fairy redoubts, lights dance and dust puffs as evidence of fairy activity, and those of us who dare to cross to their side live shortly or longer afterwards, seemingly at the whim of beings diminished in size but not in power. Speaking Irish, hurling, dancing, they represent the survival of a "hidden Ireland" refusing to capitulate to the modern age, just as Daniel Corkery wrote, perhaps romantically I admit, of the 18c bards clinging to the their remnants of an indigenous Munster mentality. Lenihan's collected accounts of rural informants tell us of an era that may, I hazard, hearken back to a "race memory" of the Iron Age, as the indigenous people retreated before the triumph of the unbending ax and the steely blade, so that their descendants the Tuatha de Danaan cringe before the mower's scythe or the spalpeen's knife, while we flee from their nocturnal hegemony across flowing water to at least temporary refuge.

Many who read these stories in urban Ireland or abroad, as Lenihan observes, hide their unease by scoffing at--or denying these tales as those of--a skittish and inebriated peasantry. The storyteller takes pains to gradually let these reactions surrender to, at least in an older generation, the revelation of their own rumours, those of a friend of a friend, that often parallel the encounters he has gathered over the past quarter-of-a-century, He tells us that his audience has to be able to remember a time before 1970 or so to recall any such tales.

This reminded me of the sign I saw at the National Irish Folk Museum outside Castlebar. It requested visitors to fill out forms if they wanted to share their own rural memories, specifying, however, that these needed to be prior to 1960. Between Lenihan and the National Museum system, we notice the great division between those (like myself) who remain cut off from the other side of the water, living always in a land where television silenced the seanachai, and the tales of the dark faded when, as you can see on your evening stroll, the blue light emitted from the box in every room near at least one window of nearly every electrified domestic interior.

In the depopulated hinterlands, the old folks tell their stories of the other side (the "wee folk" or its like never finding an expression in these respectful pages.) Lenihan analyses each account in an afterward combining deftly a folklorist's skill and a reciter's interpretation. He avoids skepticism and enthusiasm admirably, balancing his sympathy with the vanished culture these tales capture with a frank admission that this culture will never revive.

(Excerpted and edited from a review article in the on-line Belfast-based journal The Blanket.)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars running with the other crowd, September 1, 2009
This review is from: Meeting the Other Crowd (Paperback)
In many ways...
dear lovers of Faerie,
... this book is a modern supplement to The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries. If you liked that book, you'll surely enjoy this one, although, this book is perhaps a bit more personal, less scholarly perhaps, or less restrained in it way. A bit more of that faerie charm and enchantment resides here. It delighted us and we expect, if you love fairy lore, it will call to you as well.
kyela,
the silver elves
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The perfect book about the Good People, April 2, 2008
This review is from: Meeting the Other Crowd (Paperback)
Never have stories about the Good People sounded so convincing and true. An excellent read (and re-read).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting!, May 13, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Meeting the Other Crowd (Paperback)
I came across this book after watching an episode of Destination Truth. The author was featured on one of their episodes. Eddie Lenihan is a great author and you can tell he really cares about the subject. I found this book fascinating, mainly because of the stories but also because he explains the dangerous side of the good people as well. I agree with the other reviews that some of these stories are not good bedtime reading! But they are all interesting and worth reading none the less.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting contemporary folklore, July 7, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Meeting the Other Crowd (Paperback)
It is always wonderful to hear from a great traditional story-teller. This collction is fascinating because it is a collection of fairly contemporary stories about encounters with the Fair Ones. If the Fair Folk are of interest to you, this is a treasurer trove. I recommend it for all Pagans as well as folklorists, scholars, people who are interested in Ireland, etc.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The lyrical voice of old Ireland, March 21, 2010
By 
Minsma (Los Angeles, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Meeting the Other Crowd (Paperback)
Eddie Lenihan is one of the last seanchai, the old time storytellers of Ireland, and he's been collecting stories for decades, setting onto paper the fading light of the oral tradition. This book is full of the music of Ireland, that lyrical voice of Celtic storymakers and true fairy lore: sometimes dark and threatening, sometimes funny, always walking the line between the mystical and the hardtack reality of "back in them times." I'd recommend it to anyone who loves a good story and the testimony of real people about a forgotten way of living. I've loved reading it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Meeting the Other Crowd
Meeting the Other Crowd by Edmund Lenihan (Paperback - February 2, 2004)
$15.95 $14.03
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.