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Megrahi: You Are My Jury: The Lockerbie Evidence Paperback – February 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Birlinn Ltd (February 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780270151
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780270159
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,102,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Ashton is a writer, a researcher, and a TV producer. He has studied the Lockerbie case for more than 18 years and was a researcher with Megrahi’s legal team. He is the coauthor of What Everyone in Britain Should Know About Crime and Punishment and What Everyone in Britain Should Know About the Police.

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON VINE VOICE on April 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
Reportedly Britain's esteemed prime minister Dave has called this book a disgrace, so I was intrigued to find out why. The man convicted in a strange kind of Scottish court for the bombing of Pan Am flight 103 on 21 December 1988 is Libyan. He was repatriated to Libya on compassionate grounds by the Scottish Justice Secretary, but that was in Gaddafy's day. He is terminally ill, but Mr Romney and the ineffable Mr McCain have been prompt in demanding his extradition to America on the grounds that the previous deal is now off. What `justice' he might receive in America is a legitimate question, but this new book devotes 400+ pages to a painstaking (but extremely readable) analysis of the justice that has come his way to date. I found much that I would certainly class as disgraceful, not least the way that discussion of the case has been dominated by the stridently vocal and pathologically ignorant but I don't have the impression that Dave's anathema was meant to be hurled at that. Indeed if this is just another instance of Dave stamping his little foot and trying another of his hoity-toity put-downs then his thunderbolt may turn out to be riding a boomerang.

Towards the end the book summarises the issues under two headings - the legal process, and what actually happened. The second of these is full of uncertainties, whatever people try to pretend. The legal process is hardly less complex, but it is possible for the general public to take a clear view, even if the legal profession themselves signally failed to. There's irony in this, I suppose. We are asked to apply plain-Joe logic to the legal issues but to shun glib man-in-the-street opinions as to the actual events.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A lot of details about the Pan Am 103 case, presented by the man convicted in the case------------.
The author makes the most out of doubts that naturally arise regarding eyewitnesses, especially Paul Gaucci, that testified that Megrahi was the purchaser of clothes in the suitcase that housed the bomb. Gaucci's credibility regarding his memory is suspect, especially considering the time that had elapsed and the inconsistencies over the months and years.

The author also exploits possible gaps in the most damming forensic evidence, the parts of circuit board from the radio cassette player that housed the bomb, and the fragment of the MEBO timer found blasted into a shirt from the bomb carrying suitcase.
If this evidence was truly found at Lockerbie, and there was no tampering or manipulation, the clothes and fragments form the most compelling crux of the case. The clothes tie the bomb-laden suitcase to the shop in Malta, and the fragments seem to tie the radio cassette player and timer to Libya. It makes me wonder how many circuit boards are present in a 747 and how these stood out from the other wreckage.
The book issues two accounts of testing the Toshiba circuit board and timer frags. One states that these critical pieces of evidence in a case about an explosion were not tested for explosive residue. If true, this impeaches both items as evidence.
The other account is that they were tested, but showed no traces due to "cosummation" of the explosive materials. This would seem to be a key part of the case but seems glossed over.
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