Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mei Li Hardcover – April 1, 1955

4 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$79.16 $5.67
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
Available from these sellers.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday Books for Young Readers (April 1, 1955)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385076398
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385076395
  • Product Dimensions: 11.8 x 8.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,135,920 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
It's probably not a good idea to go into reading a picture book thinking, "Well, how will I be offended THIS time?". Still, if you go into a book with lowered expectations, you can only be delighted when you find them to be baseless. My experiences with some of the early Caldecott winning books, like "Mei Li", have sometimes ranged from gagging horror to outright shock. Looking at "Mei Li", I wasn't hopeful. It was written originally in 1939. It takes place in China with a Chinese heroine. All signs seemed to say that this book had prime racism potential. So imagine my delight and astonishment when I discovered it to be a fair treatment of a rural Chinese family existing in the 1930s. Sure, it had some elements here and there that I would have liked to have corrected, but on the whole it's a sure-footed interesting book. One of those rare Caldecott winners you can still read to your little ones today.

Mei Li is not at all pleased. Her brother San Yu is going to the New Year Fair in the city and, because she is a girl, Mei Li must stay home. Fortunately, she's a fairly enterprising little lass and by bribing her brother with her lapis-blue marble she's able to convince him to take her with him to town as well. Once there she gives some money to a begger girl and partakes of the splendors of the city. After competing with her brother to show him that girls can do just as much as boys can, she stumbles across a fortune teller. The man predicts that she will rule over a kingdom, a fate which even the normally optimistic Mei Li has some doubts about. After dressing up, playing with toys, and escaping from realistic flying kites she returns to her home with her brother and uncle.
Read more ›
1 Comment 25 of 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on February 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book truly does describe a time and place. Mei Li is often told that she's just a girl and not valued. In the end, her family comes looking for her and tells her that she is their princess when she lives within the walls of their house. I hesitated to read it to my Chinese daughter, but I do think it tells the tale of cultural values from long ago -- something she should understand sooner or later.
1 Comment 16 of 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Thomas Handforth spent time in China and had become aware of the differences between boy's privileges and girl's expectations. He is able to show that girls can generally do what boys can do in this book. He is recognized for advancing the role of women in children's literature. Another book of his, Faraway Meadow, is a clever study on learning to accept diversity. It is unfortunate that he died prematurely and was unable to write further. The world may have become more tolerant earlier in our history if he had been able to continue influencing it with his writing.
1 Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This children's book tells the story of a little Chinese girl who slips away from her family to see the big city of Peking (now, Beijing) in the 1930s. The book won the 1939 Caldecott Medal for best illustration in a children's book, the second book to win that award. As mention in the criticism from "Horn Book," it is a little wordy and forced and children of today may have not relate to Mei Li too much. But it is a nice introduction to a culture of a different time and can lead to interesting discussions between parents and their children.
In addition, it is a book that should be on the shelf of any serious student of children literature.
Comment 18 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?