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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on April 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
I am somewhat of a guitar instructional book junkie. I have literally hundreds of them, some good some bad, but I can usually get at least one or two positive things from even the worst of them. I have several books on arpeggios for guitars, and those are good for learning the different shapes. But if you just play the shapes, they will always sound a bit stiff.

Fluid Soloing has an entirely different approach. Not only were most of these fingerings for arpeggios completely new to me, the way the author has you play them was a revelation. I consider myself a fairly advanced guitarist, so after an hour or two the concepts made sense and I was able to execute a few of the arpeggios in the way the author instructed. It opened up a whole new way of playing for me. However, continuing on in the book I pretty much got my butt kicked. I would say you would have to be at least an intermediate guitarist with some fair technique to really get the most from this book. I am about half way through it and I have shoved my other books aside until I get this stuff down.

This will improve your playing, whether you're a rock, jazz, blues, or whatever guitarist. I think even if you never even used these arpeggios, your finger strength and technique will become much better having gone through this. You will find yourself doing combinations of long stretches with hammer-ons that are not your usual licks. This book will really make you re-evaluate your playing.

If you want to make some real progress with your strength, technique and chord knowledge, this book is a must. But be forewarned, it will take some work, and it's not some lightweight guide that you will blow through in a few days. This will be months of work, at least. It will be worth it. I am really getting into this book, and look forward to his next offering.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on March 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book has made such a HUGE impact on my playing. For years, I struggled to make the transition from Rock/Blues guitar to Jazz. I have always wanted to play Jazz but the complicated chord changes left my solos sounding confused and patchy at best. I credit this book for getting me over the hump.

Arpeggios to me represent a "safety net" for soloing - they always work. Since this book outlines arpeggios for pretty much every type of chord you will see (in every position), it gives you a safety net for every situation.

This safety net has allowed me to experiment more and play "outside the box" whenever I feel like stretching myself. If I lose myself or get out of control, I can always bring it back to an arpeggio to resolve the chaos. So I can practice new ideas in front of an audience without sounding horrible.

And here's the best thing... this book makes arpeggios sound COOL. The book shows you a "rapid fire" style of playing arpeggios, and that makes the arpeggios sound like really cool licks rather than boring patterns.

It's always tough to choose the right book because you know you will have to invest some time to get the most out of it. This book will be a valuable use of your time!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on May 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
A reall "must have" book in your collection
This book allowed me to really improve my playing, these arpeggios can be applied in any style you play.
The book is very well organised and well thought.
The only bad point is the lack of explanation on the theoric point of view (fonction of each note should be added: root 3 ,5 7 for instance for a Maj 7 arpeggio) and for each arpeggio a note is added to demonstrate how you outline an embellished chord but it s not explained, you have to find it by yourself.
I'm really waiting for the following books of the Fluid soloing serie from mel bay
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on February 24, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This is an excellent book on learning arpeggios for guitar across, and up, the entire neck of the instrument. The book presents 8 arpeggio types - Major, Major Seventh, Dominant Seventh, Minor, Minor Seventh, Minor Seventh Flat Five, Diminished Seventh, and Minor Sixth (I am not entirely sure why that last one was included, is that chord really that popular?).

The first section of the book presents each arpeggio type in seven different positions. The positions are as follows: fifth string starting with the root note on the first finger, sixth string starting with the root note on the first finger, fifth string starting with the root note on the fourth finger, sixth string starting with the root note on the fourth finger, fourth string starting with the root note on the first finger, sixth string starting with the root note on the second finger, fifth string starting with the root note on the second finger. That's a total of 56 different patterns! Oh yeah, shed-city.

The second section of the book connects the position-based arpeggios into full length of the neck arpeggios. Very nice indeed. There are three patterns for each of the eight arpeggio types. That's 24 more patterns for the shed. There are also some practice etudes that connect different arpeggios together into musical phrases. Again - nice.

Of course no book is perfect. The order in which the arpeggios are presented in each section is weird to me; Minor 7, then Dominant 7, then Major 7, Diminished 7th, Minor 7th b5, Minor 6th, Major Triad, Minor Triad. Way weird. Why not Major Triad, Major 7th, Dominant 7th, Minor Triad, Minor 7th, Minor 7th b5, Diminished 7th , then Minor 6th. That way you work your way through the flatted notes in an orderly manner (BTW - I suggest you practice the arpeggios in that order - and memorize which part of the chord each note you play represents).

And I find some of the fingerings a bit bizarre - the FIVE fret stretch on page 19 Example 37 is insane and can be replaced by playing two notes with your little finger one note per consecutive string. There isn't a lot of emphasis on how to use all this arpeggio knowledge, but that is perhaps the subject for another book.

But then, no book is perfect. This book, plus a good book on scales and modes (I haven't found one of those, so I made my own based on stuff I learned at Berklee), and you should know your way around the fingerboard in most impressive style.

I would whole-heartedly recommend this book for any guitarist, beginning to advanced (unless you already know EVERYTHING listed above), although obviously it will be a long slog for the beginner, but well worth it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This review is coming from a High Level Intermediate/Advanced level guitarist. This is the best book specifically dedicated to arpeggios I have come across. The author gives the reader 36 pages of patterns and then the rest of the book connects everything very nicely. The spiral binding and the included CD are a nice finishing touch to a quality product. I'm excited to see what topics the author's future books cover.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 30, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Fluid Soloing: Book 1 contains a wealth of technical exercises for the development of fluid arpeggios. Clearly a great amount of work went into preparing this "wizard's handbook." Unfortunately, in the first few exercises I turned to, I found errors in fingering. On the first page of exercises, page 8, there is an error in the second measure of example 2: the fingering "1 3 1 4" doesn't make sense to me; I have substituted a fingering of "1 3 4 3." On the next page I turned to, 38, the first measure of tablature incorrectly has the b note on the 12th fret of the 2nd string, when it ought to be on the 7th fret of the 1st string. After over 20 years of reading guitar books, I am used to such errors, but in a book such as this, meant for serious students, they are a disappointment.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 27, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book requires a lot of study and some dedicated practice time, but is quite complete and comprehensive. I've been working on my lead playing and arpeggios with this book for more than a year now and am able to outline complex chord progressions from all over the fretboard. These patterns and this way of learning the guitar neck can be applied to any style. This has really opened a lot of new sounds up for someone who primarily played minor pentatonic stuff before.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on October 27, 2010
Format: Paperback
I agree with all the other enthusiastic reviews posted here. This is the best book for this sort of thing that exists--I know because I've bought all the others. The only thing I'll add is that I think the author's way of executing the examples is very good; that is, he advocates (insists on) using strict alternate picking for any picked notes that occur in a given example. However, I think most examples work better if you use economy picking. But this is a personal thing so it might be useful for each player to try both alternate picking and economy picking to see which he prefers. This is a very minor quibble and the book is not in any way diminished by it; it's a fantastic arpeggio workout that will keep you up for weeks and months on end. Great fun!.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
I have put this review on all 4 books in this series, I found them all to be very effective and I think even more so when all 4 are used as they are related and the material is brought together in the fourth.

First I will tell you that I have purchased at least 3 dozen guitar books, so I feel I can speak from experience when evaluating these items. I have been playing for over 40 years, so why do I still buy books? For the first 20 years of playing, I was content to stick with chords only as I am a composer and that was my focus. Over the last 10 years, I have been slowly (slowly because I am an adult now and can't just play all day) developing my soloing technique and theory foundation. I love thistuff, so one hurdle down 0 I like to read and practice. All that being said, I find that guitar books vary in disturbing ways - scales laid out in different patterns, different views on the best picking and other techniques, and worst of all, differences in the qyantity and quality of information included. There are a few authors out there preying on the knowledge hungry would be lead players with big promises and little useful info. There are others who have included a wealth of information but are devoid of explanations on how to apply the information, or the reader is required to have achieved a higher level of expertise than the marketing would suggest.

I bought the four books in Tim Quinn's "Fluid" series after checking out the TOC and sample pages, I also use the other reviews (taken with a grain of salt). I have been more than satisfied. These books deliver thorough coverage of each subject and do so without overly difficult language. Also, the tone of delivery is relaxed, encouraging, and JELPFUL. There are tons of useful tips for learning and applying the lassons. The additional audio on the CDs is 1. Good quality (not always the case) 2. Good musically (again the same) and 3. very useful, meaning the big 3 are included - examples of lessona, extended examples incorporating all of the lessons together and backing tracks to play to on your own forever.

One last thing, I have found that Tim will answer emails should you have a question. He doesn't answer overnight, but he did get back to me. A guy like this is quite busy I'm sure, and I don't believe in abusing this kind of thing because an author doesn't "owe" this to you, but I had a question and he answered, so he deserves credit for it. The thing I like most about this series is the focus on application and the way the material clears up how to apply scales in a concise manner that's not too technical, he finds an excellent balance between theory and application, though I also must add that there is a good amount of material here that teaches ways to use altered versions of the standard scales that you won't find everywhere, and again this is material that has great value for real-world application.

I recommend this entire series, I asked Tim about the recommended order of study, and though he said you can choose, he has found that the order the books are in is best. After seeing how the 4th book ties everything together, including using arpeggios with scales in solos, I agree. He really gives you a coomplete education in constructing solos using the pentatonic scales both horizontally and vertically on the fretboard. Using BOTH of these approaches is key to acquiring a command of your instrument and achieving the ability to use it as fluently as your voice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 10, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Most people will look at the title and groan "not another arpgeggio book", well in this case they would be mistaken. While it's true that there are only so many ways to play and teach arpeggios Mr. Quinn has put a fairly unique spin on the topic that makes this book stand way out from the crowd.

First off some of his chosen fingerings are not the ones commonly taught and all of the runs utilize hammer-ons and pull-offs. On a first pass through some of these fingerings you will be thinking "why on earth..." but as you practice them you'll understand why they were chosen the way they were. Mr. Quinn's method allows you to develop extremely economical picking (similar to Frank Gambale's style) while at the same time maintaining strict alternating picking. This keeps the sound of each note in the arpeggio distinct, i.e. this is NOT speed picking or any other method where speed is attained by using multiple down or upstrokes in series. Nevertheless with practice, and you do need to practice this book, you can attain pretty blinding speed. Further this overall method is applicable to scales as well though that isn't covered in the book.

The book takes you through all the commonly used chords in rock/jazz in each of the 7 distinct positions. It gives runs in both straight eights and in triplets insisting on alternating picking for both. It then shows you how to connect different arpeggio runs across a moving chord progression and gives a variety of exercises for connecting the fingerwork to music. This is where the book really starts shine by forcing you to do this very difficult work. Once done you truly have mastered single position arpeggio work.

Once the single position work is done Mr. Quinn then introduces arpeggio runs that span multiple positions tied together with slides. This is difficult stuff and takes time to master but the results are truly worth it.

Finally at the end he ties everything together with etudes that let you confirm and polish your learning.

Throughout Mr. Quinn stresses the fundamentals of mastering a run very slowly before attempting to speed it up. He also stresses the importance of maintaining alternating picking AT ALL TIMES. This is critical when the speeds get up in the 140+ range.

This is not an easy book. This is not a book that you can just whip through a page a week and smile when you are done. This is a book that will become one of your key references that you will refer back to time and time again as you learn different pieces over the course of your study. By the time you can honestly say you can play everything in this book in whatever key you will be seriously on your way to being a true musician.

If you are a serious student or a professional guitarist this is one book that really must be in your library.
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