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Mel Gibson's Bible: Religion, Popular Culture, and "The Passion of the Christ" (Afterlives of the Bible) Paperback – December 1, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0226039763 ISBN-10: 0226039765

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Product Details

  • Series: Afterlives of the Bible
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (December 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226039765
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226039763
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,345,794 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The exegeses are tours de force that will surprise and delight readers by taking them so far below the surface of Gibson''s tortuous realism. For college stedents especially, the essays will succinctly and gracefully demonstrate how informed cinematic and historical interpretations can affect a viewer''s experience. . . . I can report that the book will be a real page turner for anyone interested in popular religious expression, anti-Semitism, the alliance between evangelicals and Catholics formed around this film, and a host of other issues that agitate American religious culture." -- John Shelton Lawrence "Journal of American Culture" --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Timothy K. Beal is the Florence Harkness Professor of Religion, director of the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, and codirector of the Interdisciplinary Initiative on Religion and Culture at Case Western Reserve University. His most recent book is Roadside Religion: In Search of the Sacred, the Strange, and the Substance of Faith. Tod Linafelt is associate professor of biblical literature at Georgetown University. He is the author of Surviving Lamentations: Catastrophe, Lament, and Protest in the Afterlife of a Biblical Book, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

More About the Author

Timothy Beal is Florence Harkness Professor of Religion at Case Western Reserve University. He writes about the Bible and the fascinating and complicated ways it figures in culture. He has twelve books and has published recent essays in The New York Times, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Washington Post, and has been featured on radio shows including NPR's All Things Considered and The Bob Edwards Show. He also has a blog at HuffingtonPost.com/timothy-beal, which includes a series he does called BibliFact, which "fact-checks" political Bible talkers on the campaign trail.

Tim was born in Hood River, Oregon, and grew up just outside Anchorage, Alaska. He is married to Clover Reuter Beal, who is a Presbyterian minister (he calls her a "Presbyterian shaman," which totally makes sense to anyone who knows her). They have two kids, Sophie and Seth, and live in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

Photographer Copyright Credit Name: Sophie Rebekah Beal, 2005.

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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Prager on November 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
I think that you can't just ridicule a book because it has ideas you don't like, if those ideas are expressed well. Sure, this book may be a little academic, but if that means that it is not boiled down to the lowest level of lame reductionism, so be it. There are profound ideas behind the movie, and trying to fish them out can be a great exercise. Sorry for the sparse review, I just wanted to balance out another POV. I also recommend "Religion and Its Monsters" by Beal
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9 of 31 people found the following review helpful By N. Ravitch on March 21, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just take Prof. Heschel, the daughter of a distinguished rabbi and scholar. She finds Gibson's movie anti-feminist. That's a hoot, considering that traditional Judaism was anti-feminist.

Some good ideas here, a lot of nonsense by axe-grinding academics. What is clear is that Gibson is 150% a Catholic medieval type. No one here has a good explanation why this appealed to Protestant fundies and bigots who don't give a hoot about the Stations of the Cross or the Virgin Mary.
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