Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Memoir of a Misfit: Finding My Place in the Family of God Hardcover – January 10, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$1.70 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (January 10, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0787963992
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787963996
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,986,185 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

People have always looked at Ford funny. "As a child," she writes, "I blamed my family, that odd, five-member cast of cartoon characters that always walked along the sidewalk in single file so that real families could pass by intact." The older she got, the more often she blamed herself-for the death of three grandparents in six weeks; for harassment from a trusted counselor; for humiliation in a succession of controlling churches; for feeling ignored by God. Dulling the pain, she spent her young adult years in an alcoholic haze. Eventually her friend Eileen, who "always, always puts her verbs at the beginning of a sentence," ordered her to "give it up. Tell God you'll never have another drink again." Ford obeyed, but she continued to feel like a misfit despite a good marriage and professional success as a writer and editor. Then a sudden health crisis jolted her out of constant attempts to meet others' expectations. During a subsequent retreat, "I found the courage to look at myself and... hear the cry of my own heart." Ford's story, though serious, is not dark. Introverted, self-deprecating, perfectionistic and depressive, she is Woody Allen pursued by Jesus Christ. If there is a flaw in her captivating account, it is her leap from God-haunted despair to cheerful eccentricity in just one chapter. That chapter is full of clues as to what made the difference, but from a self-described "overthinker," it is not quite enough. Let's hope she is leaving room for a sequel.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

People have always looked at Ford funny.  “As a child,” She writes, “I blamed my family, that odd, five-member cast of cartoon characters that always walked along the sidewalk in single file so that real families could pass by intact.”  The older she got, the more often she blamed herself – for the death of three grandparents in six weeks; for harassment from a trusted counselor; for humiliation in a succession of controlling churches; for feeling ignored by God.  Dulling the pain, she spent her young adult years in an alcoholic haze.  Eventually her friend Eileen, who “always, always puts her verbs at the beginning of a sentence,” ordered her to “give it up. Tell God you’ll never have another drink again.” Ford obeyed, but she continued to feel like a misfit despite a good marriage and professional success as a writer and editor.  Then a sudden health crisis jolted her out of constant attempts to meet others’ expectations.  During a subsequent retreat, “I found the courage to look at myself and…hear the cry of my own heart.”  Ford’s story, though serious, is not dark.  Introverted, self-deprecating, perfectionistic and depressive, she is Woody Allen pursued by Jesus Christ.  If there is a flaw in her captivating account, it is her leap from God-haunted despair to cheerful eccentricity in just one chapter.  That chapter is full of clues as to what made the difference, but from a self-described “overthinker,” it is not quite enough.  Let’s hope she is leaving room for a sequel. (Feb.) (Publishers Weekly, January 27, 2003)

More About the Author

Mostly, I'm a book author, with 18 traditionally published books. I'm also a ghostwriter, though of course I can't talk specifically about those books; let's just say that I've ghostwritten or contributed to 12 additional books. I'm also a book editor, book reviewer, writing instructor, writing mentor, and journalist. I'm married with two adult daughters, and I have a special interest in postmodern spirituality.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Richard J. Vincent on March 23, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In the preface to this book, Phyllis Tickle writes, "Misfits give texture to life. They also tend, on a routine basis, to challenge the preconceptions that masquerade among us every day as normative behaviors." I so readily identify with Marcia Ford, not simply because our stories are remotely the same, but because of her willingness to view herself as a perpetual misfit -- hoping to one day fit, but ultimately realizing that it probably is not to be. My favorite line in the book: "I started to believe that never in my life had I held what could be called a popular opinion" (p. 140). Ditto!
In this delightful book, Marcia recounts her life from her early days to the present. Her story involves encountering and being influenced by a wide variety of religious traditions: She was converted by Methodists, taught the Bible by Baptists, introduced to charismatic renewal and contemplation by Roman Catholics, and taught to laugh by Pentecostals. Her spiritual pilgrimage has finally led her to the Episcopalians. She has come to resonate with the centrality of the liturgy where "Everything, everything, pointed to Him -- not to the rector, not to the sermon, not to the music, but to Jesus. This was clearly an evangelical church" (p. 181).
Marcia's self-deprecating humor and candid opinions make her book a delightful read. Throughout the book, she willingly expresses doubts, disillusionment, and despair. In the end, however, she learned that "God [was never] more fully present in my life than He was in those times when He seemed farthest away" (p. 185).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By FaithfulReader.com on March 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Marcia Ford claims she's always felt like a "misfit," and for most of her life, she says people have looked at her "funny." Initially, she thought it was because her family was so weird, walking down the sidewalk in a straight line, as they often did. But at the age of ten, when she was away at camp and her family moved without telling her, Ford found herself standing in a room full of strangers who were all looking at her funny. And lo and behold, she wasn't with her family. Unfortunately for Ford, the funny looks continued long after she was "born again" and desperately tries to fit in with other Christians.
In MEMOIR OF A MISFIT, Ford writes what it's like to be a square peg trying to fit into a round hole --- something most of us can relate to, especially within church walls. But what sets Ford apart from the rest of us "misfits" in Christendom is her willingness to stop embracing the impossible ideal of what a Christian is supposed to look, act and feel like and just be...herself. On the way there, though, she runs around in circles, trying everything --- promiscuity, marriage, drugs, alcohol, suicidal thoughts, fundamentalist Christianity, finally chucking all religion --- before eventually coming around, thanks to a couple of Christians showing her unconditional love, to a new faith and realistic understanding of God.
At certain points in her narrative, I felt Ford was sharing too much personal information and it made me a tad uncomfortable. But it works because she writes her tragic tale with so much honesty and tongue-in-cheek wit that it keeps you from getting bogged down in just how sad her story really is. Maybe it's because there's so much to read between the lines.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Marcia Ford is an authentic child of the '60s, affected by the swirling tempests of Vietnam, flowering drug use and societal disintegration. Yet, she found her way out of this morass of rebellion -- only to discover manipulative forces at work in the church as well. She writes about all this with a verve and an eye for detail that is both humorous and insightful. I think what I liked best about this book was that, in the end, the author maintained her faith instead of the all-too-common: "Life stinks, everyone's a hypocrite and we're all oppressed" infantile musings that pass for philosophy. This book is a page turning delight.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By billy on May 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
this book by marcia ford is excellant!i loved it and irecomend itfor everyone who has felt out of place.It has helped me so much this book im so thankful she wrote it .read this book for a honest,well-written book that is full of heart,love and faith.thanks marcia
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hollie on September 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It was an incredible experience to read into the world of Marcia Ford. I found myself unable to put it down, thinking, what could possible happen to her next!? She has been through so many hardships, most that she can look at now with a humor that makes life seem easier to live. I myself am still searching for that home that is so frequently spoken of in this book. I learned so much from her life, and thanked God that I didn't have to learn it the hard way like she did. Her strength encouraged me a great deal. The day I finished I let a friend borrow it. It is the kind of story that HAS to be shared because different people will gain differently from it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search