Buy Used
$3.89
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by awesomebooksusa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in good or better condition. It has no tears to the pages and no pages will be missing from the book. The spine of the book is still in great condition and the front cover is generally unmarked. It has signs of previous use but overall is in really nice, tight condition. Shipping is normally same day from our warehouse. We offer a money back guarantee if you are not satisfied.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Memoirs Of A Korean Queen (Korean Culture Series) Paperback – January 4, 1987

ISBN-13: 978-0710302489 ISBN-10: 0710302487

Used
Price: $3.89
10 New from $28.94 18 Used from $3.89 1 Collectible from $110.46
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$28.94 $3.89
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Korean Culture Series
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (January 4, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0710302487
  • ISBN-13: 978-0710302489
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #750,592 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

In her sixtieth year, Lady Hong began this memoir for her grandson, King Sunjo, in order to explain the "Imo Incident" and to clear her family name of any wrong doing associated with the tragedy. At age ten, Lady Hong became the wife of Crown Prince Sado, next in line to be the king of Korea. Unfortunately, her husband suffered from paranoia and delusions that intensified over time. In response to his son's actions, the King killed him in a bizarre and horrifying manner: this murder became known as the "Imo Incident." Its affect on Lady Hong was all encompassing: "In the face of this disaster it seemed as if heaven and earth touched each other and the sun and moon turned pitch black, and I had no desire to remain any longer in this world." For years prior to her husband's death, she had longed to talk with the King, to ask for help; because of royal protocol, all she was allowed to do was watch her husband's violent abuses. Memoirs of a Korean Queen provides a rare example of writing by a Korean woman during this period and an equally rare view of her life and those around her. Two hundred years later Lady Hong shines through as a thoughtful, intelligent woman whose life was circumscribed by the custom, culture, and Confucianism of her time - the same custom, culture, and religion that provided her with the strength to endure. -- For great reviews of books for girls, check out Let's Hear It for the Girls: 375 Great Books for Readers 2-14. -- From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Holly Smith

Language Notes

Text: English, Korean (translation) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Lady Hong, the grandmother of the King of Korea, recounts the terrible story of her young life: chosen from a group of Korean girls to marry the Crown Prince at the age of eight, she watches him slide into madness and rivalry with his father. The Prince's malady first shows itself as peculiar concern about clothing, and later turns to violent behavior towards his staff; finally to a life-and-death struggle with his father. The story itself is riveting,and is accompanied by fascinating details about the daily life of a traditional Korean aristocrat.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Memoirs of a Korean Queen is a first person historical account about the Imo Incident (July 11, 1762). This novel was written over an eleven-year period by Lady Hong, the wife of Prince Sado, to show her grandson, King Sunjo, that her family was not at fault for the death of Prince Sado. Although she does not outright say that it is King Yongjo's fault for Prince Sado's death, she certainly implies that it is the King's fault because of his inadequacy as a father. Also, this novel is a fine example of Confucian values that were set forth in that time of Korea. It is these Confucian values that gave her the strength to continue; while at the same time it rendered her powerless.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoy reading about history especially if it's an autobiography. Although this princess story is not what you find in fairy tales, it was amazing to find out how tragic a life of "privilege" could be during those times. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to know the real life of Korean royalty in the 1700's.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first heard of this story through the various Korean dramas I watch. I wanted some history to go with the stories, and found this. It is a lot more interesting than I expected. I know that TV tends to exaggerate, but this shows that the TV shows didnt have to stray much from reality for a good story!~
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?