Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto / Bruch: Violin Concerto / Scottish Fantasy

August 10, 1999 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
12:11
2
7:21
3
6:11
4
8:22
5
8:42
6
7:19
7
8:19
8
5:23
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6:52
10
7:39


Product Details

  • Label: Decca
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:18:19
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0015T5LM2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #203,404 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 21 customer reviews
Those 2 recordings are different and both excellent.
J.J. schenski
Chung plays with great imagination and adds meaning to the notes (while many other performers can play with passion, the structure of the piece goes nowhere).
P. Rah
I will certainly check out some of her other recordings.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By John Dynan on August 9, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I'll be honest; I bought this CD for the recording of the Bruch Violin Concerto. I have never really been a great fan of the Mendelssohn work included here but I enjoyed the Scottish Fantasia, which sort of made up for it. I have been aware of this recording for 20 years but I had not heard it until I bought it. My previous standard by which I measured the Bruch was the wonderful Oistrakh version of the same work, recorded in the 1960's. The dynamics of this piece were not previously as apparent to me as now and there are passages in this recording which really make my hair stand on end. Kyung Wha Chung makes the instrument speak as I have never heard it before and that, combined with a subtlety as well as some blistering runs, started to really speak of the genius of Max Bruch. A good performer can do a piece justice but it takes a great one to give the listener an insight into the ability and intention of the composer. Kyung Wha Chung really raised the bar with this one.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Passionate on August 5, 2003
Format: Audio CD
...I feel obliged to say something, as I believe this is one of the outstanding must-have cds of recent years.
Kyung Wha Chung cut these legendary recordings in the 70s (Bruch) and early 80s (Mendelssohn), with fantastic analogue sound and outstanding orchestral rapport. She plays the Mendelssohn with a pace which brings out the sheer joy and beauty of the music, free of lingering exaggerated sentimentality. If ever there was a modern masterpiece, this recording is one. The sound is sweet and virile, and in this as in so many of her recordings she plays as if she is capturing a live performance, not the stereotyped studio. There is a spontaneity so often lacking in studio recordings, which doesn't fade with repeated hearings.
The Bruch Concerto is also wonderfully fresh, a real breath of life in a much-recorded work. (Astonishingly, she plays this work even more beguilingly later with Klaus Tennstedt, coupled with the Beethoven, another must-have recording). I first heard this Kempe collaboration of the Bruch Concerto and Scottish Fantasy when it was released on vinyl, long ago played into scratched oblivion as was the way with my favourite LPs. Hearing the CD is just magical. Even the fabulous Heifetz Mendelssohn (Munch) and Bruch (Sargent) recordings don't eclipse Kyung Wha Chung's legendary performances, which are appropriately remastered on the Decca Legends label
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Young-seok Park on February 21, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This is Ms. Chung's a historical recording and legacy for all of us. You will easily recognize her unique way of redition. I really enjoyed her Bruch: I'm sure no one can immitate her style about those two works. I also liked the 3rd movement of Mendelssohn: pretty vivid and precise.
The sound quality is superb: more analog sound: warm and soft. Wow... 96Khz/24bit! Keep up the great job, Decca!! I think I don't have to want DVD-Audio if I can get this quality always.
Why don't you collect Decca's legends starting this wonderful CD?
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David Dennis on January 22, 2003
Format: Audio CD
What a find this album is, or perhaps 'find' isn't the right word, being a blend of two previously released albums...a cherry-picking, if you will. In any case, Kyung's playing is moving and energizing in its ability to invigoriate both a warhorse like the Mendelssohn concerto and a rarer piece like Bruch's Scottish Fantasia. The Penguin Guide practically raves over this album, and rightfully so...it's a landmark piece worthy of collection by everyone from novice to jaded. The 24bit/96khz remastering does wonders for the sonics and, at htis price, there is no reason not to leap, grab, and add this to your collection.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Oh Shuwen on May 6, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This review is in response to gripes by the aforementioned reviewer regarding the "excessive" dynamic range on this CD.

Sound engineers do not purposely "exaggerate" dynamic range on discs - in fact, if you were familiar with modern sound engineering, you would know that a prevalent problem nowadays is the *reduction* of dynamic range (compression) in order to win the "loudness race". I do not know of a single disc out there that had its dynamic range artificially "expanded", if this is even possible.

In other words, your playback equipment is to fault - it is (sadly) typical for lower end audio equipment to not reproduce low level information well; it vanishes, making fortissimos startling and pianissimos absent. Or perhaps you are listening to this disc in a noisy environment, with low level information getting lost in the haze of environmental noise.

Regardless of the reason, I feel that your opinion on this disc's sound quality should be taken with more than a small pinch of salt given the information that I have relayed here.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By P. Rah on February 24, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This is a disc of classic recordings. The Bruch works are played with dazzling virtuosity and hot fire that is the Chung trademark. But there is poetry and inner emotion as well. The Scottish fantasia I love especially in this CD, as it really sounds like a fantasy. Chung plays with great imagination and adds meaning to the notes (while many other performers can play with passion, the structure of the piece goes nowhere). This is something Chung can do magnificently. Any piece she tackles has meaning and structure. Even in the Berg concerto, a work I found confusing before I heard Chung's performance, she was able to grasp the intention of the piece fully, so I was able to hear what she was saying and what Berg was saying in the work. The concerto is played with no less energy and fire, although it can sound a little tired on repeated listenings. But the rapport between soloist, orchestra and conductor is really something. They play the pieces like chamber music: they talk to each other and respond back. Kempe is a conductor I have always admired, and here he exceeds my expectations. The balance of the interpretation is just right, although sound-wise the violin is a little too forward. But that is no reason to not enjoy this recording. But I suggest her later recording with Klaus Tennstedt on EMI for the concerto. The Mendelssohn is the real gem in this CD. For once this overplayed work sounds fresh. This was recorded 8 years after the Bruch in Montreal, with the Montreal Symphony under Dutoit. The acoustics are more generous and forgiving thatn on the Bruch works, but again the violin is too forwardly placed. This was especially apparent in the original CD issue of the work, coupled with the Tchaikovsky (her second version.Read more ›
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