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Mercenaries of Gor Paperback – June 30, 2007


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Paperback, June 30, 2007
$59.82 $12.99

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 488 pages
  • Publisher: e-reads.com (June 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0759219443
  • ISBN-13: 978-0759219441
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,093,735 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Norman, born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1931, is the creator of the Gorean Saga, the longest-running series of adventure novels in science fiction history. Starting in December 1966 with Tarnsman of Gor, the series was put on hold after its twenty-fifth installment, Magicians of Gor, in 1988, when DAW refused to publish its successor, Witness of Gor. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a trade publishing outlet, the series was brought back into print in 2001. Norman has also produced a separate, three-installment science fiction series, the Telnarian Histories, plus two other fiction works (Ghost Dance and Time Slave), a nonfiction paperback (Imaginative Sex), and a collection of thirty short stories, entitled Norman InvasionsThe Totems of Abydos was published in spring 2012. 

All of Norman’s work is available both in print and as ebooks. The Internet has proven to be a fertile ground for the imagination of Norman’s ever-growing fan base, and at Gor Chronicles (www.gorchronicles.com), a website specially created for his tremendous fan following, one may read everything there is to know about this unique fictional culture. 

Norman is married and has three children.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "meliciani" on April 22, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Why did John Normans books ever go out of print? War on Gor is a rousing and fearful affair---and when the armada of Cos landed and began its sweeping arch against the mighty city of Ar, Tarl Cabot was swept up in their drive. Outcast from Port Kar, rejected by the Priest Kings, Tarl fought now for his own redemption. With comrades at his side, barbarian warriors and daring women, free and slave, his plans went forward---until the mercenaries of Dietrich of Tarnburg disrupted the struggle as a mysterious third force. MERCENARIES OF GOR brings into action all the magic and conflict of that counter-Earth, as Tarl became the center of intrigue and treachery in the city of his greatest enemies. Definetely worth trying to get your hands on. :)
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Gor saga has always been in something like equal parts a plea for the natural order/women being subservient to dominant males and a pleasant action adventure in the Edgar Rice Burroughs tradition. To get to the 21st book implies that I've always found these story attractive. Generally the books are intentionally mildly humorous and the writing has a charm. That said this one is out of balance insisting on long discussions of the joys/benefits of female slavery and discussions of the specifics of various women in slavery and being introduced to slavery. In John Norman's view this is the natural order and his women are attracted to slavery and thrive enslaved. The fact that they are all beautiful is probably not incidental. There is a plot involving a war between the sea power Cos and the land power Ar the most powerful city state on Gor. Clearly this book and the preceding one, Players of Gor, are setting up this plot and familiar characters from earlier in the series are apparently going to reappear. Clearly there is treachery involved but this book does not move the plot along sufficient to it's length. It is almost as if Norman couldn't decide how to proceed. He has clearly set the stage for the grand war, the great treachery and for Tarl Cabot (aka Bosk of Port Kar) to play a roll behind the scenes but could not chose among a buffet of choices. In previous books Norman has been able to make them self contained in that you could read one and have a sense of completion. This one ends unsatisfactorily in a cliff hanger kind of manner where the hero, Tarl, has been arrested but his fate is in limbo. There are hints that he is being betrayed but reassurances that he will be treated with honor. Both of these outcomes have precedent in the previous 20 books.Read more ›
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By Crawford on September 1, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
MERCENARIES OF GOR was the first time author John Norman did not deliver a complete Tarl Cabot story. He hadn't done so in SAVAGES either and Daw Books could've done a lot to rectify that however BLOOD BROTHERS OF GOR corrected the situation. MERCENARIES contains farcical elements carried over from PLAYERS, and reinstated in MAGICIANS. Those elements are strong in the latter two titles, but MERCENARIES suffers when the same device is used. Hurtha is an undeniable buffoon playing the important position a Misk, a Kamchak, an Hassan or a Forkbeard normally occupies in a Cabot novel. Boabissia is the weakest characterization of a wannabe slave girl as far as I can recall in any of Norman's sprawling oeuvre, a severely limited persona at best. Hurtha and Boabissia's characters are of such little consequence and deployed so heavy-handedly for comic relief that I find both unamusing, unrealistic and hopelessly unlikeable. When MERCENARIES' interrupted continued storyline does resume two books later in RENEGADES OF GOR, Hurtha and Boabissia are mercifully absent. While a certain small Dickensian quality exists in them, they irritate me no end as characters.

Another big culprit is Norman's lack of daring in the derring-do department in this book. MERCENARIES OF GOR seems as plotless to me as one of those ambiguous black-and-white European movies. I recognize conceits in both stuffy and popular literature like the plotless novel. MERCENARIES OF GOR definitely is one of those, just not one of the good ones! Usually the Gor books narrated by Tarl Cabot are good but there are a few bad ones. This is one of them.
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By Brandi Mitchell on December 21, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love all of the Gorean Saga and I hope it continues! I love that they are all tied together!
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