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Merely Mortal?: Can You Survive Your Own Death? Hardcover – February 1, 2001


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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Antony Flew (Reading, UK) is professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Reading, England, and the author or editor of over thirty-five books, including How to Think Straight and God, Freedom, and Immortality.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (February 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573928410
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573928410
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.9 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 1.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,263,602 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By C. Wynes on February 16, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The idea for this book is a good one. Most people, without thinking about it, have accepted as their notion of personal identity a form of the Platonist/Cartesian dualism approach. That is to say that most people think of themselves as a little homonculus sitting inside a head cavity, linking their personal identity to a "soul" or "mind" and concluding that their survival (including survival after death) is linked to the fate of that incorporeal "stuff".

When you call into doubt this common belief, three excellent questions are presented. First, what is personal identity (i.e. what makes me "me"?) Next, how does personal identity continue over time (i.e. how am "I-now" the same as "I-then"?) Finally, can this personal identity continue past death?

These are very interesting subjects, but unfortunately Dr. Flew does a poor job of writing about them. I've read some very dense contemporary philosophy in recent years, and some lighter reading geared towards the lay person. There are good ways to write either style. This book fails by either standard.

The organization of topics is downright awful. Dr. Flew loosely structures the book as an examination of various schools of thought about the mind-body problem throughout history. Within these sections, however, he switches readily on and off topic.

His paragraph structure reads like Ralphie's essay assignment in the holiday film "A Christmas Story", a series of non sequiturs with nothing to bind them together. A philosophy book needs to make arguments, and it requires an author who is adept at organizing arguments into written paragraphs.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Yanni on June 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Being either an agnostic or an atheist depending on how you define the line between them and what my mood is that day, I'm inclined to share Dr. Flew's scepticism on the subject of an afterlife, but I find his arguments rather circular and totally unconvincing; his insistence that he has thoroughly debunked the argument in favor of the mind as the indentifier of personal identity rather than the body is rather irritating, considering that he has done no such thing; he discounts the argument that if a person's consciousness suddenly found itself in a different body as mere science fiction and therefore irrelevant, ignoring the fact that while (so far as we know) this has never happened and can never happen, IF IT DID, the consciousness would be the source of identity, not the body. Granted, there are aruments that make this problematic; if one accepts that consciousness is the source of identity, then one has to define what constitutes consciousness, and if one goes with "memory", that leaves us with the question of whether an aged person suffering dementia who has lost much of his/her memory is no longer the same person, as well as the question of why, if mind/personality is the source of identity, physical/chemical effects (hormones, drugs, even lack of sleep) can make such a radical difference in a person's mental abilities and personality. Flew attempts to address these arguments, but does a particularly vague and unenthusiastic job of it, largely because he seems to feel that they are unnecessary arguments because he feels that his other arguments against mind/consciouness as the seat of identity are better when in fact they're completely unconvincing. (And if they don't convince me, a fellow sceptic, I'm not sure who they ARE going to convince.Read more ›
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Edward Bolton on January 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Unless you know exactly why you want to buy this book,

little chance exists you do want to buy it.
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