Mergers & Acquisitions and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mergers & Acquisitions Hardcover – Bargain Price, April 5, 2007


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Bargain Price, April 5, 2007
$2.72 $1.90

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Hardcover (April 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594489343
  • ASIN: B000X1P4AW
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,700,945 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A graduate of Duke University in 2002 and an analyst for J.P. Morgan for a few years after that, Dana Vachon is a writing wunderkind along the lines of Jay McInerney in Bright Lights, Big City and Bret Easton Ellis in Less Than Zero. However, the similarity ends with the theme of young guys on the razzle, because Vachon's protagonist, unlike his predecessors, observes and learns without falling into the honey pot. Tommy Quinn graduates from Georgetown and lands a job with J.S. Spenser, an investment banking firm. His major was Interdisciplinary Studies, a kind of Liberal Arts wastebasket, and he knows nothing about finance. In the brain-deadening Spenser training program he hooks up with Roger Thorne, a really crass human being, but one who knows all the moves. The genesis of the friendship sets the tone rather well: They are both wearing Gucci loafers and Rolex watches.

The story begins at Roger's engagement party, with Tommy waiting for his erstwhile girlfriend Frances to arrive. Everyone thinks that she has been at a spa, but she has really been in an upscale Home for the Unsure, being ministered to by a freaky shrink. The story then moves backward through Tommy's ruminations about meeting Roger, "the John Audubon of preppy flesh," and about connecting with Terence Mathers, Spenser's guru of mergers and acquisitions. At the end of Mathers's first speech to the new Spenserites, Tommy says: "We had all partaken of the capitalist Kool-Aid and the applause was as much a tribute to the stupidity of young men and women after four years of elite education as it was to the success of Spenser's training program." Greed is definitely good in this atmosphere--the more the better--but Tommy is not really a full-fledged participant. After Tommy blows his first assignment, he and Roger are sent to Cabo San Lucas on a major deal. What happens there is life-threatening and hilariously over-the-top but perfectly plausible and moves Tommy to rethink his life path. Vachon has left his own fledgling financial career behind, and instead has written a first-rate first novel that is smart, funny, witty, and wise. --Valerie Ryan --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Greenwich, Conn.–bred Vachon did a stint at JP Morgan after graduating from Duke, an experience that no doubt influenced this dizzying romp through investment banking heaven and hell, which rises and falls among numbing corporate indoctrination, pressure-choked deadlines, fabulously swank parties and an obscenely over-the-top business junket complete with kidnappers. At the heart of it all is Tommy Quinn, an upper-middle-class kid from Westchester whose Georgetown degree in Interdisciplinary Studies leaves him bereft of finance know-how. No matter, once Tommy hooks up with Princeton grad Roger Thorne (who has a real pedigree, a reputation for sexual prowess and a hot sister), and the two pursue careers based mainly on smoke and mirrors. Vachon's glee in poking fun at this complex, debased world is evident in his purposefully excessive descriptions of sex (particularly Roger's "dude"-laden monologues), drugs and ruthless execs, but there's a certain amount of drooling involved, too, in the intricate descriptions of jewels and bonuses. Tommy's romance with Frances Sloan, a troubled trust fund heiress, is predictable (though still diverting), and his and Roger's careers (along with several gratuitous deaths that mark them) have denouements and aftermaths that feel forced at best. Imagine a tyro Jay McInerney without the pathos and the been-there, done-that offhandedness. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I will be looking forward to his next offering.
Gregory Solis
The characters, even though seemingly over the top at times, ring true, and present archetypes that are unforgettable.
S. Licht
The dude should have stuck with his kickin' banking job on the Street, for such wording is how this book reads.
N. Soltvedt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 31 people found the following review helpful By R. Spell VINE VOICE on June 6, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm an investment banker at a regional firm so I always enjoy business biographies based around the biz. Unfortunately, half these books spend more time on New York society and the personal lives and desires of people more interested in the new hot restaurant than a good character based novel. In other words, Bonfire on the Vanities it's not.

The book synopsis on Amazon supplies the telling clue: a book along the lines of Bright Lights, Big City and Less Than Zero. If you like those two books, this is for you. For me, the significant time spent developing plot lines around the truly wealthy with whom he works and his privileged background which can only be described as upper middle class wears very thin. Another mother with a drinking problem. Another description of the girlfriend with a super wealthy but very dysfunctional family. It becomes very tedious.

However, there are passages of total irreverence that are quite entertaining. His closest friend of wealth who "brown noses" his way through the job but whose true goal is to bed beautiful women. His own miserable failings in his job at which he quickly recognizes he is terrible and attempts to search for a company angel to protect him from the inevitable firing is also interesting. And I must admit that the closing Latin American party on the yacht provides great comic relief.

Overall, mildly entertaining with no great attachment to the characters. An OK read that I would not recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Phoebe Dog on October 22, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Given the strong media reviews, I was expecting something funny, engaging and smart. This is none of the above. While I'll give anyone credit for actually writing a book, not to mention getting it published, this was a real disappointment. The novel comprises a series of vignettes that are meant, I guess, to be amusing in their ridiculousness. I found them to be just inane, unoriginal, and, more importantly, totally unsuccessful in creating an actual network of characters and an engaging plot. I would strongly encourage others not to waste time giving this a read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. Bennett on September 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I did enjoy this book, but I wish the author had written a few more chapters on actually working in the office of J.S.Spenser. The author does have a comic way of writing, I liked the part where the main chararter converted the US dollar into itself! I also liked how the book was written, it started in the present at his friend's engagment, then the next chapters where in the past and the last chapter was at the engagment party. Though I did find the main character's girlfriend a bit disturbing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Peter John Emblin on May 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I thought this would be a fictional insight into the world of bankers. Its more an insight into the world of high society New York. A good airplane read but dont expect too much depth
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Foster on July 31, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book was not what I was expecting. Very hum-drum, most of the text is spent reading the main character's boring perspective on work, life and his sometimes offensive sach-religious side notes. This book was offensive in other areas as well - all minorities in the novel are addicts of some sort, thieves, drug sellers or some sort of depressing character. There was no comedic outlet, no emotions get drawn, this book was simply two thumbs down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Kirby on June 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I have read countless books from this genre, both fiction and non-fiction, and without question this is one of my favorite books of all time. If you have any experience in investment banking, contractual law or just business in general, you will find this satire to be in a league of its own. Bravo monsieur Vachon!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Kennedy on February 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover
For anyone expecting this to be another "Liar's Poker" wannabe - a book about Wall Street - it may take a couple of chapters to adjust to the reality. Or the unreality. This is really a satirical romp, more of the Tim Dorsey / Carl Hiaasen Florida-genre, except it's not set in Florida. But it's not really set on Wall Street either. Some of the early scenes unwind there, but Wall Street has essentially a cameo role in this book. (And it's not about investment banking, let alone Mergers & Acquisitions.)

So that's what it's not. What is it?

What it is, is a cynical, funny, frothy, sex-soaked, highly readable bash at the feckless rich. Inhabited by completely unrealistic, cartoonish characters (one of them has his initials monogrammed on his shirt - M.O.R.O.N. Another one is ... well, read the book.)

The plot is manic. (Though one hesitates to use the term 'plot' to refer to the episodic collection of events these characters are run through.) Mostly manic in a good way, though it does run off the deep end every now and then. Well, actually, it runs off the deep end every time it goes anywhere near it. Makes Carl Hiaasen look like Charles Dickens.

Another degree of separation from Dickensian satire - Mergers & Acquisitions doesn't deal with people who have a bent moral compass, they have no moral compass at all. They are randy and rich, most of them are mean-spirited, narrow and faithless, and a few of them are downright unhinged. The one or two acts of fidelity go, to say the least, unrewarded.

So, does it have any redeeming merit?

Yes: It's funny. It is very funny. Dana Vachon can find an occasion for humour in almost anything. A fatal heart attack? LMAO. This isn't just the deep end, it's the noir deep end. But if you like a laugh you could do worse than Mergers & Acquisitions.

(I actually listened to the audio rather than reading it. Excellent narration too.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?