Qty:1
  • List Price: $67.50
  • Save: $15.19 (23%)
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by JGS74
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships From Amazon and FAST. Eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping! Next Day Shipping also available. Tracking number provided with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Meritocracy and Economic Inequality Paperback – January 4, 2000


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$59.95
Paperback
"Please retry"
$52.31
$27.00 $11.00
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Meritocracy and Economic Inequality + Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success
Price for both: $85.35

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (January 4, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691004684
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691004686
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,234,608 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Recent struggles over affirmative action have raised the argument that selection should be based solely on merit. Underlying objections to affirmative action are also based on assumptions by some that such programs have done nothing to alleviate chronic poverty. Some of meritocracy's believers suggest that those who do not get ahead either do not want to or are incapable of doing so. These dozen scholarly papers dispute any relationship between intelligence and inequality. The collection's three editors are economics professors; Arrow is a 1972 Nobel Prize winner. Contributors come from the economic, social, and biological sciences, and they analyze the relationships between merit, reward, and opportunity. They investigate the causes and consequences of "intelligence" and consider the role of schooling in economic opportunity. Finally, they recommend policy options and offer proof that "educational and economic reforms can reduce the income gap and improve the country's . . . economic well-being." David Rouse

Review

"A distinguished group of editors has compiled this collection of 12 papers by some of the most notable scholars in the field. . . . This book raises important issues about economic inequality, returns to human capital investment, and the role of government."--Choice



"This is an enlightening and provocative book of essays that should be examined by anyone with an interest in current hypotheses and evidence on the determinants of inequality in America."--George Farkas, Contemporary Sociology



"A useful collection of empirical studies, models, and discussion that, taken together, make a case for a sharp change in American policy towards more aggressive efforts to reduce inequality. . . . The breadth and depth of these essays and the strong presentations of evidence and argument make them of interest even to those least supportive of the views advanced here."--John D. Owen, Economics of Education Review



"With technical papers from a range of disciplines, the volume makes fairly solid reading, but it presents some fascinating ideas and results which are broadly accessible."--Danny Yee, Danny Reviews

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Lemas Mitchell on May 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
It's very interesting how the experts here tore apart The Bell Curve with minimal effort by taking a look at the data in a sensible/ rigorous way. One author assumed that all the data was correct as given and challenged its relevance.
Most importantly, one of the articles used the mathematics associated with these social experiments and asked "Do these numbers really show you what you think they do?" In all of my exhaustive reading about this subject, this book is the first that I have read that specifically addresses that point.
While lots of people have dismissed the proponents of genetic inferiority as an explanation for the "failure" of blacks in the USA, the rebuttals have invariably failed to contront the reasoning of the authors, preferring to dismiss them out of hand as "racist."
One thing that was lacking in this book is a more detailed analysis of the disparity between ethnic groups of the same race-- and yes, they do exist, contrary to what you would believe from reading the newspapers. For this, one of two Thomas Sowell books is a good read. The first: "Race and Culture." The second: "Knowledge and Decisions."
Unfortunately, the use of lots of technical jargon is going to put this fine piece of literature out of the reach of the vast majority of the hoi polloi.
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?