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Mes Confitures: The Jams and Jellies of Christine Ferber Hardcover – September 1, 2002


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Mes Confitures: The Jams and Jellies of Christine Ferber + Mes Tartes: The Sweet and Savory Tarts of Christine Ferber + Blue Ribbon Preserves: Secrets to Award-Winning Jams, Jellies, Marmalades and More
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 287 pages
  • Publisher: Michigan State University Press (September 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0870136291
  • ISBN-13: 978-0870136290
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 8.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #53,604 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Ferber is a fourth-generation French patissiere whose specialty is her unusual, delicious jams and jellies, which have gained an international following among chefs (Alain Ducasse, who wrote the foreword, serves them at his renowned restaurants) and other gourmands. This book, a best seller in France, presents dozens of recipes, organized by season, for preserves from Black Cherry with Pinot Noir to Greengage and Mirabelle Plum with Mint; a number of them include chocolate, not a standard addition. Few of the recipes include headnotes, although translator's notes identify the more exotic ingredients; instructions are on the brief side. However, any jam maker will find Ferber's book fascinating. Recommended for all canning and preserving collections.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Christine Ferber lives in Alsace, where she continues to make jams, pastry, and confections by hand, with only the freshest local ingredients. She is the author of several books on French cookery.


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 41 customer reviews
This has lots of good recipes.
E. H.
The book is primarily a collection of primo recipes for producing jams and jellies worthy of smearing on your artisinal breads or filling your handmade Linzer cookies.
B. Marold
I have been borrowing this book for over a year and finally bought my own copy.
Susan Mathieu

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

111 of 114 people found the following review helpful By Jadepearl VINE VOICE on July 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The recipes are very simple. Usually requiring a few steps for small batch jams and preserves. However, it is not for the inexperienced unless they have good back-up books like _Blue Ribbon Preserves_ which explains clearly how to sterilize and prepare jars and focus on a more scientific approach to preserves.

Ferber provides flavor inspirations and deceptively simple approach. However, there is no explanation in the book for pectin substitution. She relies on either the natural pectin found in the fruit or uses green apple jelly as a pectin base which means you get to make alot of green apple jelly adding a whole set of steps to the jam/jelly process. The book does not explain which fruits have enough natural pectin to set and what level of set.

If you know what it means to skim the juices already then the simple instructions are enough to work with but if you have no "feel" or previous knowledge of preserves making than the instructions seem skimpy. This is NOT a teaching volume it is an inspirational volume for the experienced preserves person.

The important thing though is that the flavors are fabulous. Just be sure to read the instructions first and research carefully your subsititutions and also your preserve process or else the simple instructions become too simple.

Recommended for the collection.
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96 of 100 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on January 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
`Mes Confitures', subtitled `The Jams and Jellies of Christine Ferber' is written by Ms. Ferber herself, in French, translated by Virginia Phillips, and introduced with a foreword by Alain Ducasse. In case these circumstances are not enough to clue you in to what is afoot here, let me tell you that this book is not about your grandmother's strawberry jam. It is also not about your mother's Smuckers and certainly not about your Polaner jelly. This book is about artisinal products as carefully done as French wines and cheeses. In fact, the similarity between wines and these preserves are a lot closer than almost any other comparison, as the raw material of both is very similar.

Before going much further, I must give a word or warning that I do not consider this book a complete manual on how to make and preserve jams and jellies. In fact, it is telling that the title and subtitle DO NOT include the word `preserves'. While I am not an expert on preserves and canning, I have enough knowledge, acquired from a typically excellent episode of Alton Brown's `Good Eats' to know that successfully packing a confit in a sterile container is not the same as prepping a PRESERVE which can safely sit on an unrefrigerated shelf for up to a year. So, if you are serious about making confits and preserves, get a very good introductory book on canning, as Ms. Ferber's book is much more of a master class on the subject, which assumes you know a lot about the mechanics of canning and preserving. The book is primarily a collection of primo recipes for producing jams and jellies worthy of smearing on your artisinal breads or filling your handmade Linzer cookies.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Becky Campbell on November 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book is one of the most exciting cookbooks that I have used recently. Besides containing standard flavors such as strawberries and peach, it also has the more interesting combinations of Pear with a Balsalmic Vinegar and Spices, Carrot with Cardamom, Strawberry and Balck Pepper, and so forth. Every combination I have tried has been incredibly good, especially the Raspberry with Star Anise. Most of the recipes seem to make about 5-6 half-pint jars, but as it's not stated anywhere in the book, make sure to sterilize a few extra. These jams always come out fresh-tasting and with a slightly soft set, the benefit of using natural pectin in fruit and not adding one. However, since some of the low pectin fruits still require pectin, there is a recipe for green apple pectin stock to provide the needed pectin, great if you have access to underripe apples.

This is a great book, especially for those wanting to take preserve making one step further and try interesting combinations. In fact, trying those interesting combinations certainly got my creative juices flowing and inspired me to make some fun mixes of my own.

However, this is not a book that goes over the particulars involved in preserving foods and canning, and the necessary sanitation and precautions it entails, so any first-time canners need to pick up another book or do some research online for these techniques.

All in all, I would definetly buy this book again if it was ever lost or stolen by the many admiring friends who have borrowed it so far.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Lally Brown on July 16, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I love jams made with unusual ingredients and combinations, but I don't love making five batches to fine tune the taste. Christine Ferber has already done it for me in this book, and her inventions are *fantastic.* She has a true european appreciation for the concept of savory. Not every jam needs to be cloyingly sweet. Many of her recipes call for overnight fruit/sugar macerations to slowly combine the ingredients.
She does have a habit of seeming to forget that most of us don't live next to farmers and friends who can stroll about and collect fresh ingredients for us. Her recipes often call for specific varieties of fruit. Luckily the translator has written brief footnotes for most specific listings like that, and you can figure out a good substitution. If nothing else, head to a farmers market and tell them the flavor/consistency of fruit you want and they can help you find a native variety that matches.
Hopefully none of my family members will read this book, because if they do they're going to know what jellies they're getting for christmas this year.
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