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67 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars love never dies
Before I start to review this book, I have to tell you I have had a few "weird" signs of my one. I have had some premonitions and some dreams that were in the "yeah right" description. Nothing about September 11, 2001. (Actually, I do know someone who did and he had absolutely no connection with anybody involved in the September 11 murders.) So I want you to understand...
Published on April 25, 2010 by Patricia R. Andersen

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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good and enlightening read, but...
I was touched by this book and read it in almost one sitting. However, I think it could have used better editing. Much of what was written in the last few chapters was redundant and not as convincing. What is much more compelling are the testimonies on actual visitations from loved ones after their tragic deaths. The psychic babble and coincidental occurrences (eg. change...
Published on June 25, 2010 by CS Pond


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67 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars love never dies, April 25, 2010
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Before I start to review this book, I have to tell you I have had a few "weird" signs of my one. I have had some premonitions and some dreams that were in the "yeah right" description. Nothing about September 11, 2001. (Actually, I do know someone who did and he had absolutely no connection with anybody involved in the September 11 murders.) So I want you to understand that I do believe in this kind of thing so you know where I'm coming from.
Bonnie McEeaney is the widow of one of the many people killed that day. Her husband, Eamon McEeaney, had some strange premonitions prior to the tragedy that it was going to happen. Not in the way he could pinpoint it - he just had a feeling that he was not going to live to see a wedding that was being held in December 2001. He wasn't ill, he was a healthy active man. And despite his foreboding, he went off to work at the World Trade Center on that fateful day and never came back.
After he died, Bonnie McEeaney began to ponder what he had said. She found out that other people that had lost loved ones on September 11 had some of the same sort of experiences - the sense of impending loss, dreams and signs about September 11.
She also found out something else. Many of these people had contact with their loved ones after their death. M's McEeaney began to do a little bit of research into this strange realization.
The book has many accounts from the people left behind on September 11. Some had the premonitions, sometimes their loved one did. As you might expect, some are very religious - but then there are those who don't identify with any particular faith.This makes for very interesting accounts of what happened to these people.
The stories are also heartbreaking. So many lives lost, so much sorrow and pain.
It can be a little hard to take to read about another person losing the love of his or her life. So it's probably best to read this book in small doses so you can understand and not become overwhelmed by all the grief - or at least, that's how I did it.
The stories about the contacts after death ring true to me. It doesn't seem to be wishful thinking on the part of the people left behind. All the visitations seem to work to assure the people that their departed ones are in an afterlife where they still love them.
M's McEeaney writes very well about her subject. She even voices her moments of doubt. She is compassionate about the people she writes about without being overly sentimental. And though this book is about people who lost loved ones in the terrorist attacks, it's easy to related those experiences to my own life.
I would recommend it highly to any one who has the least bit of interest in paranormal experiences. It's a good place to start to investigate the spiritual world as these are real people, with real histories, giving their accounts. And enough accounts are given to show the reader that love never dies even if the person (people) you loved have died.
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40 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, touching book, May 12, 2010
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I was in the middle of another book when I got this one. I decided to crack it open and 'just take a peek'. Ha! My other book was left to the wayside as Messages became my 'go to' book every night.

The book is about Bonnie McEneaney's personal paranormal experiences after losing her husband in the 9/11 tragedy. She also includes many other people's visitation experiences.

The author is a very talented writer. She has really done a great job putting together different families stories, and even included photos. I loved the background information and the pictures of the families.

My favorite thing in the book was an untitled poem with Love is light, Light is love... WOW.

You won't regret reading this book. It can be truly life altering when you remind yourself that we've all got people looking out for us, even if we can't see them.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heart Touching and Real, May 20, 2010
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Like millions of others around the world, I remember the day the entire planet stood still and watched with horror, sadness and grief as the towers fell. I remember thinking of how awful it must have been for the people trapped inside and even though I had no connection with those in peril, I still shed a river of tears for the tragic loss of life that day. To this day, they have still been nameless, faceless people... Until I read this book.

I never actually sat down and thought about the lives that were so abruptly cut short that day. Husbands, wives, mothers, children, fathers and brothers all gone in the blink of an eye. 'Messages' isn't a detailed look into a handful of lost lives but it gives you a glimpse of who they were and who loved them and mostly, how that love can often cross any boundary, even the one created by death. I was deeply engrossed and humbled by this book and I often found myself wondering about signs I might have missed.

I think the thing I liked most about this book was that while it had significant religious undertones, it wasn't all about God or Christianity. It was accepting of almost all religions and the need to talk to "your God".
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, peaceful and reassuring, June 5, 2010
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After my own personal experience with 9/11 and that my spiritual experiences, I found the recounts of families of 9/11 victims very comforting and concurring with my own experiences. Sometimes, when you are on your own with these experiences, it is often easy to dismiss: now I know for sure that my own experiences were real and that our soul's energy actually does move to another energy plane. you will love this book if you are seeking reassurances that our soul returns to source and we on the human plane does remain connected to our love ones through love.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be Prepared for Tingles, May 24, 2010
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Zoeeagleeye (Belfast, ME United States) - See all my reviews
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At first I thought this would be yet another painful retelling of story after story of death and grief that events on Sept. 11 brought about. I was not up to watching the grief-stricken relive their fear and devastation on paper. Events happened, I mourned, let's move on. A person can only take so much sorrow. But, wait! There is no moving on from a reality that uplifts. Instead, it deepens you and broadens your life.

I discovered that "Messages" had the ability to change me, to make me a smarter, more aware person. It will do the same for you, along with expanding your compassion should you need that task done. This book inadvertantly shows you that you are more than just flesh and bones, that your analytical mind is not the only one you have, that there is a loving "Oneness" that excels in communication if you only take the time to listen.

You have probably heard the phrase, "We are all connected." Specific examples of that idea are nice to come across rather than letting one's imagination wave about in the wind. "Messages" is the simple, well-written book that does exactly that: you get marvelous and moving tales of always perfect hindsight of fore-knowledge, along with outright precognition. Don't tell me you have never realized after something bad happened that you had a "feeling" about it! This happens to us all. We would pay better attention, but that kind of ability is not well-regarded in our left-brain society. It is good to be reminded that we can and do know things that will happen in our lives. It strengthens our connection to our intuition and gives us felt guidelines so we can tell the real from those things we merely fear will happen.

Bonnie McEneaney does a very good job with these stories and what we may call "spiritual concepts" -- although they are really our heritage as humans. Be prepared to be amazed and expanded in terms of life after death; life before death; death, and the lack thereof; precognition; intuition; connection; a greater reality; what we know that we refuse to acknowledge; and, best of all, the love behind all life.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What if..., June 14, 2010
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Reading this book will make you wonder what if...

What if there is more to life than seeing the current reality we are living in...
What if love crosses the boundaries of time and space to comfort those left on the earthly plane...
What if all this is true...

Messages will make you wonder how all the people involved somehow knew what lay ahead and later came back to comfort the ones they left behind.

Recommend.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 9/11 VICTIMS MAKE CONTACT FROM "THE OTHER SIDE", June 13, 2010
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People of many religions say they believe in the immortality of the soul, but many are still reluctant to talk about anything they experience that seems to confirm the continued existence of a deceased loved one. They are afraid of being told they should "get over it" or that they should "move on." Even worse, they fear being told to see a shrink, that others will think they've gone `round the bend mentally. Not wanting to jeopardize a career or alienate friends, they never talk about any experience of a spiritual nature.

But friends and families of 9/11 victims HAVE talked to Bonnie McEneany, herself the widow of a 9/11 victim. They have told her about intensely personal experiences and revelations they feel are real proof that their loved ones continue to exist. Some of these contacts involve an actual sighting of the person, who typically appeared transparent and remained for only a very brief moment. In other cases, it was something more subtle, like finding an item that that seemed to appear from nowhere, or the persistent presence of a bird or butterfly, and in some cases it was dreams that were so real or so indicative of the deceased person that it was felt as an actual contact. Many families also consulted psychics and mediums who were able to provide information that could only have come from the deceased.

Were all these experiences just a reluctance to face the fact their loved one was dead? Of course, critics will say that's what this is, and other readers may be more charitable and say that it is fine for those who grieve to take comfort wherever they can find it. But why are we so unwilling to accept that actual contact takes place between the living and the dead? Do we not actually believe that "life goes on" after the death of the body? If we do, then isn't it logical that the person who has passed on would continue to care about those left behind? Isn't this likely to be especially true when the death was sudden and unexpected?

Many of the stories in this book involve some sort of awareness or strange sensation on the part of a family member at the moment of the presumed death, some sense, for example, at the time one of the towers collapsed that their husband, son or whoever was sending a message. Mainly the message these people received was taken to mean "I'm OK," although in a physical sense they were far from "OK" - in fact, they had just died. These messages seemed to be motivated by a concern from the deceased that their survivors not think they are totally gone, that survivors should know that their loved ones can still see and communicate with them.

Critics of the existence of an afterlife love to slam mediums and psychics as phonies, but 9/11 survivors often received meaningful messages through their intervention. The author provides the names of those who helped, along with testimony from 9/11 families who consulted them. Some psychics say they had premonitions that something terrible was going to happen concerning the World Trade Center. It seems when there is an impending large loss of life, especially involving unexpected deaths, there is a seismic shift in the psychic field that some can feel.

These are poignant, wrenching stories, sometimes of great bravery near the end. I was especially affected by the story of "the man in the red bandana" - Welles Crowther - who organized the safe evacuation of many others, saving their lives while losing his own. His mother heard the stories of survivors on TV talking about being rescued by a mysterious man wearing a red bandana, Welles' trademark, and she knew it was him. After his death, many people who knew him had experiences of seeing him or feeling his presence, always with a comforting message from him. This young man, who had thought of changing careers to doing something more meaningful - he told his mother he wanted to be a NYC fireman - spent the last moments of his life helping others, then continued to provide comfort from "the other side."

There are a number of other books that have similar stories that confirm the 9/11 experiences. Some of these books also involve sudden deaths from a disaster. I recommend two such books by John G. Fuller: The Airmen Who Would Not Die and THE GHOST OF FLIGHT 401. These books concern messages from "the other side" after air crashes. I also recommend Letters from the Other Side: With Love, Harry and Helen. This is a really moving series of letters received through automatic handwriting back in the years following the first World War that paint an interesting picture of how spirits spend their time. For another inspiring vision of life in the spirit world following physical death, I also recommend 'Nosso Lar' - A Spiritual Home, a translation from Portuguese of material from Brazilian medium Chico Xavier.

September 11, 2001 was a terrible, terrible day, and I'm guessing that you, like me, can remember exactly what you were doing when you learned of airplanes flying into the Word Trade Center. I was at work and heard from a co-worker that an airplane had hit the WTC. Watching CNN on my computer, I saw the picture of smoke bollowing out of one of the towers. When my co-worker shouted out that it was a commercial airliner that hit the building, I knew it had to be deliberate. When I saw the tower fall, I shut down my computer, grabbed my belongings and headed out the door to the parking lot, and all I could think of was getting home to my husband and daughter and being with them. Our country was being attacked, and I could not hold back the tears as I drove home. I did not have any friend or family in the towers or on those airplanes, but I felt the horror that day, and I can only imagine how bad this must have been for these families who also watched the towers burn and collapse. Their strong emotions and desire to hear from their loved ones may have triggered the contact as victims "passed over" in large numbers.

Our mainstream religions do not give us any coherent view of what happens after death, and religious leaders tend to disregard messages from the spirit world, or even condemn them, but it is from these kinds of sources, especially as they seem to corroborate each other, that we can begin to put together a picture of that world, and try to discover how communication can take place. Only when we can be open about spiritual experiences, without fear of ridicule, can we truly gain an understanding of the meaning of physical death, and the meaning of true love that continues beyond the transition to the other side.
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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good and enlightening read, but..., June 25, 2010
By 
CS Pond (New England) - See all my reviews
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I was touched by this book and read it in almost one sitting. However, I think it could have used better editing. Much of what was written in the last few chapters was redundant and not as convincing. What is much more compelling are the testimonies on actual visitations from loved ones after their tragic deaths. The psychic babble and coincidental occurrences (eg. change everywhere) were not as convincing or even interesting.

Also, as a liberal Christian I found that there were too many testimonies from Catholics and not enough, if any, from Jews or any other religious background (or atheists). It makes one wonder, as with the Rite of Exorcism, etc. in the Catholic church: are those who are practicing and devout Catholics more prone to visits and spiritual experiences from the light or the dark side because of the trappings and rituals of their faith?

I'm not a skeptic and have had many supernatural experiences of my own, especially in the natural world and in regards to strange clock activity. Also, I know of people who have experienced strange butterfly occurrences as were written about here. There is no doubt, as the Transcendentalists believed in the 19th century, that the natural (and supernatural) worlds have much to teach us.

I believe that this book would be of great comfort to survivors from 9-11, or any other unexpected tragedy, and also to those who have lost loved ones and friends without the ability to say goodbye. In that it has likely succeeded. However, for greater depth and further illumination on life after death, I highly recommend the writings of Elisabeth Kübler Ross and Raymond Moody.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Signs are all around us -- these people just happened to noticed, June 6, 2010
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Anne (SHREWSBURY, MA, United States) - See all my reviews
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As a person who was affected in so many ways by the 9/11 disaster, I admit I had a bias to like this book. Like the author, I, too, believe that there are messages coming to us all the time, and receiving them simply requires presence of mind. These people were not psychics -- just ordinary individuals who were somehow tuned in at a crucial moment. An interesting collection of stories, and a reminder that we all can be better listeners in our lives.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving, Well-Written, Provocative; Highly Recommended, September 24, 2010
"Messages: Signs, Visits, and Premonitions from Loved Ones Lost on 9/11" by Bonnie McEneaney is a well-written, deeply moving, provocative book about love, the value of human life, and evidence of existence beyond biological death. "Messages" includes accounts of inspirational heroes, and the book itself is courageous; it is a gift to the reader. If you are wondering about whether or not there is life after death, or even whether or not human life has any meaning, if you want to be inspired and challenged, this book is for you.

I've read a handful of popular books about psychic phenomena, and "Messages" is one of the two best. (The other: "The Afterlife Experiments: Breakthrough Scientific Evidence of Life After Death" by Dr. Gary E. Schwartz.) Too many popular books on psychic phenomena are marred by very bad writing - publishers may feel that if a famous psychic can talk to the dead, it doesn't matter if he can't construct a decent sentence. Many of these books get lost in fluffy platitudes and vague accounts that could never be verified. Psychics get in over their heads, telling readers not just that Grandpa came back to tell the grandkids where he hid his will, but that the meaning of life is that the universe is one big bubblebath and we are all rubber duckies floating around in it, or some such similar nonsense.

"Messages" is head and shoulders above such books. Bonnie McEneaney approaches her topic with a fine mind, apparent integrity, and complete earnestness. Her motivation to record the psychic phenomena experienced by family members of 9-11 casualties was prompted by her own beloved husband's murder at the hand of the 9-11 terrorists. She experienced phenomena that were beyond chance. That started her on the journey of contacting other 9-11 family members. In most cases, informants' first and last names are provided, along with photographs. These aren't vague, unverifiable "friend-of-a-friend" accounts. These are the beyond-chance narratives of highly successful, skilled, well-educated, well-compensated, professional people who conduct their lives with a high degree of responsibility. These are bankers, computer programmers, police officers, firemen, ministers, and health professionals.

McEneaney's own harrowing journey began the summer of 2001. Her husband told her he was sure he would die soon. Nine days before 9-11, he discussed with his wife how to escape from the WTC in the event of the attack he was certain would happen soon. He concluded that he could handle his upcoming death.

Bonnie McEneaney was not prepared for psychic phenomena. She was a skeptical business executive with an advanced degree who regarded those who consulted psychics as "weird" and "different." Her experiences and her research on this book convinced her of a "spiritual, perhaps divine" component of life that "defies human logic" (3). The fear of appearing "weird" or "illogical" prevented her own mother from telling her about psychic phenomena that had previously occurred in her family (12).

Most of the people covered in "Messages" are well-to-do. At least one reader admitted here that he had a problem with that. Those of us who are not wealthy bankers may have a hard time feeling compassion for wealthy bankers. That's unfortunate. In fact, this feature of the book is valuable. It reminds us that those so frequently demonized rich, white Americans are also full spiritual beings - and sometimes heroes.

There was Abe Zelmanowitz, a computer programmer and Orthodox Jew. Zelmanowitz could have escaped from the WTC with his life. Instead he chose to stay behind with his wheelchair-bound friend, Ed Beyea, also a computer programmer. Irma Fuller, Ed's attendant, who did make it out alive, testifies that Abe stayed behind in the hope that help would arrive and he could get Ed out of the building. Apparently help did not arrive, and Abe died with his friend. Abe's family reports that four days before 9-11, at his synagogue, Abe had had an impassioned exchange with a rabbi about how Jews could sanctify God's name, in accord with the tradition of "Kiddush Hashem." Abe's heroic act of self-sacrifice was done "in the name of love of God and loving friendship" (223).

Twenty-four-year-old equities trader Welles Crowther had premonitions the summer of 2001. "He appeared to be reviewing his life," Alison, his mother, said (89). Survivor accounts reveal that Welles stayed in the WTC when he could have left. He organized escapes and carried at least one woman on his back, put her down, and went back to get more injured people to safety. One rescued woman described Welles, "this incredible hero, running back and forth and saving the day. People can live a hundred years and not have the compassion, the wherewithal to do what he did" (95). When Welles' body was found, it was alongside firefighters and emergency service workers.

Welles' mother, Alison, felt blown to pieces by her beloved son's death. She went to her minister. How to go on? How to find meaning? "Help people," he told her (94).

McEneneaney doesn't hammer at this point, but it is evident on every page of the book: these 9-11 casualties and survivors are motivated by universal love, a miraculous idea that transformed the world two thousand years ago. Again and again, on page after page, the message of love, forgiveness, meaning, service and compassion comes through. One need only contrast this with the diabolical doctrine that was followed by the 19 terrorists to understand how unique, how significant, and how truly miraculous is the love imperative.
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Messages: Signs, Visits, and Premonitions from Loved Ones Lost on 9/11
Messages: Signs, Visits, and Premonitions from Loved Ones Lost on 9/11 by Bonnie McEneaney (Paperback - August 23, 2011)
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