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44 of 53 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Drenched in style and saturated with speed, this is a Metal Gear like none other
Being a long time MGS fan, my hopes were not particularly high with this game. The absurd title, the ludicrous box art (which looks like something from the 90s), the temporary cancellation of the project, and the departure from the MGS tradition, all led me to believe that this was a disaster in the making (despite Platinum's fine track record). Fortunately, I've been...
Published 21 months ago by G. Denick

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3.0 out of 5 stars Unmemorabe
After Metal Gear 4 setting the bar so high, this version was a weak installment. While I did enjoy the swordplay and fighting techniques, the novelty became old, and I ended up button-mashing to beat every enemy. Most of the bosses just came out of left field, with some never being introduced, so I ended up not caring about any of them. There were a few villains that...
Published 28 days ago by Sarah


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44 of 53 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Drenched in style and saturated with speed, this is a Metal Gear like none other, February 19, 2013
By 
G. Denick (Somersworth, New Hampshire) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
Being a long time MGS fan, my hopes were not particularly high with this game. The absurd title, the ludicrous box art (which looks like something from the 90s), the temporary cancellation of the project, and the departure from the MGS tradition, all led me to believe that this was a disaster in the making (despite Platinum's fine track record). Fortunately, I've been pleasantly surprised by the quality of this game... "Rising" is a blast to play for anybody who enjoys action games (whether you're an MGS fan or not).

Foremost, the game does manage to retain the feeling that it's actually occurring inside the MGS universe, despite its over-the-top nature (and in terms of physics, anything our protagonist does in "Rising" is not far from what Vamp achieved in MGS2 and 4). Longtime fans will be pleased by the inclusion of familiar sights, sounds, and themes, even if the gameplay is radically different. Raiden, of course, returns, and his inclusion as the protagonist is bound to please any MGS fan who has wanted to step into the shoes of a ninja on the level of the legendary Gray Fox.

The heart of this game, like any action title, is its combat mechanics, and here "Rising" shines. Raiden moves with an effortless grace, and when he strikes, it carries a convincing "weight" that exceeds even the likes of "God of War" and "Bayonetta". His "ninja run" while goofy in name, is a blast to execute, as are his assortment of magnificent combos.

When it comes to Japanese wackiness, I've pretty much seen it all at this point in my life. Giant robots, ninjas, and cyborgs generally come off as tired and cliched to me, but somehow, "Rising" makes these concepts seem fresh and EXCITING. What's the secret? The game uses a beautiful style of presentation that is incredibly slick, resulting in an artistic, vibrant mode of visual storytelling that is a pleasure to behold. Despite the ludicrous dialogue, mediocre voice acting, and marginal plot, the game's visual flair picks up the slack, and makes this somewhat-cheesy story work. It takes cyborg-ninjas (the "Winds of Destruction" are on par with finest of MGS bosses), and makes them viable, turning them into showmen that are simply a blast to watch and engage with. The gameplay is nicely balanced with expertly rendered cut scenes that always impress, and are kept to lengths that are actually appropriate (another breaking from MGS tradition). This game is so visually impressive, it actually made me want a bigger TV, to better digest the spectacle!

The limitations of this game are as follows: The camera will fight against you a bit too often, particularly during blade mode, when it will inexplicably perform a 180 and send you facing the wrong way (while you're using your limited energy to pull off this special move). I hope this is corrected with a future patch. Another weak spot is that the mechanics, while largely intuitive, could have been explained much better during the game. I must have missed the part where they tell you how to parry (a skill you need in order to even get past the first boss, much less complete the game), and I actually had to go online to figure out how to do it. There is no explanation of parrying anywhere in the menus. Hint: Press "square" (X on the 360) and flick the analog stick at the incoming attack at just the right moment, in order to parry.

The greatest weakness, however, is an ill-fitting soundtrack that simply does not fit with the world of MGS. Fortunately, you can go into the options from the menu and turn the music level down, while leaving the sound effects at their normal level. The soundtrack was a point of contention where Platinum butted heads with Konami. I feel that Platinum should have yielded to the judgement of Kojima and Konami on this subject, and once more retained the superb services of composer Harry Gregson-Williams.

I rate "Rising" at 4, possibly 4.5 stars. Depending on the enjoyment that can be gleaned from additional play-throughs and the acquisition of unlockables, I may bump that rating up to 5 stars. This is by no means the best Metal Gear game, but it's a fantastic, thrilling ride by any measure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High Octane, Lightning Paced Cyborb Ninja Action, October 31, 2014
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This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
Purchased this on sale as I eagerly await the release of MGS5: Phantom Pain.

Spiritual sequel to Hideo Kojima's acclaimed Metal Gear Solid 4, Revengence reimagines the gameplay as a hack & slash featuring everyone's favorite cyborb ninja, Raiden.

The game still offers up the series' trademark philosophizing but it's more cocky and cavalier, not as mournful as on the Snake side of the mythos. Raiden's adventures take place after Metal Gear 4 and the game references the Sons of the Patriots affair as a turning point with regard to how conflicts are fought. While the game's war-has-changed future represents the cheapening of human life that disgusted Snake, nobody seems all that bothered by it. Raiden himself treats his own body like a weapon, disposable and replaceable.

One minute, I was done up in goofy traditional dress or wobbling underneath a metal drum to sneak past enemies. The next, I was in a gruesome processing plant, where brainstems of abducted children were held as raw material for new crops of bionic cannon fodder. The action through the game is bombastic, with set pieces that get more overblown as you go. You'll run up a barrage of missiles to destroy the helicopter that launched them and hijack flying enemies to escape exploding buildings. This resonates especially with the final boss battle, which is more akin to something out of a Dragonball Z episode.

But, overall, the game's edge is sharp (puns! :D). It still hits the marks of what a Metal Gear game should be about, but inverts the combat and stealth. You're encouraged to slash instead of sneak. Rambling codec conversations and overly verbose cutscenes are waiting there for the Kojima faithful, too. The experience takes moments from samurai legend—where wild slashing and/or icy precision win the day—and updates them in a setting where technology renders the human body almost obsolete. Short as it is (roughly 8-10 hour on my first playthrough), the newest Metal Gear mixes old and new elements up in winning fashion, proving that the series may be more adaptable than anyone ever thought.

Recommended even for the traditional MGS fans or for those who are generally looking for a good hack & slash combat game
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30 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthy addition to the Metal Gear series., February 22, 2013
By 
Audrey (San Antonio, Tx) - See all my reviews
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is a new take in a somewhat unexplored direction of the Metal Gear universe. We've always known there were cyborgs and soldiers who handled missions in ways that didn't require stealth. Rising gives us a chance to explore things from a different angle while still retaining the same feel of the Metal Gear series and it does so beautifully.

The gameplay is phenomenal. Platinum has a gift with the Hack N' Slash genre and it shows with Rising. The combat is fluid and challenging while still being fun and accessible. The parry mechanic feature heavily in the game and while it may take some time to master for some, it's incredibly satisfying when you pull off a perfect parry and counter-attack an enemy for extra damage. There are certain fights that require you to have a decent handle of the move as well, and if you don't the game will help you out by beating it into you. The combat just feels GOOD. Zandatsu never got old, and cutting up enemies into tiny little pieces has never been more fun. It's obvious that a lot of time went into the gameplay and with how responsive the controls are and how many different attacks you can do, it doesn't get much better. There are fair amount of purchasable moves in the game, from a dodge to a break-dancing attack to a palm strike that sends opponents flying across the screen. Fighting is intense in this game and it requires your full attention, much more so on higher difficulties where the enemies are MUCH more aggressive and block and parry your attacks more often. They even give you different enemy types depending on the difficulty. Imagine my surprise when I started up Very Hard after my first play-through on Hard mode and the prologue tossed 3 Fenrir type enemies at me(Chainsaw Wolves)almost as soon as I started! I'm almost afraid to try Revengeance difficulty. Normal is a perfect place to start for people unfamiliar or just not well versed in the genre. It's a moderate challenge but one that won't cause too much frustration.

Without spoiling anything, the story is pretty good. It's not as in-depth as some of the other Metal Gear games, but it's good in it's own right and there are plenty of codec calls that delve deeper into things. Doktor for instance will happily chatter on about other cyborg's capabilities, pseudo-science, and how things have advanced in the Metal Gear world and occasionally gives you a bit of back-story on certain things while Raiden tries to keep up with him. The bosses have an usual method of telling you about themselves as well, while some do speak about their past, it's actually their battle themes that tell their story. When the lyrics kick in, they actually mean something to each one of them and I loved how it was done. While I wish there was a bit more exposure to some the bosses before actually fighting them, I thought the story and characterization of everyone was done well. I don't think there was even one character I didn't like. There are also a few references to old characters in the game, usually through codec conversations. Snake, Otacon, and even Rose get some mentions and there are plenty of easter eggs for Metal Gear Solid fans.

Spinning off of that, the music fits the game perfectly. It's heavy, loud, aggressive, and just like the game it wants you to pay attention to it. Depending on the stage of battles the music changes, boss fights and mini-bosses show this off more prominently but it is there in smaller battles. The music really sets the tone for the game and gets you pumped up during enemy encounters. Rules of Nature, which plays during the prologue is one of my favorite as it's "high point" kicks in during a particularly amazing section, but really all of it is fantastic.

The graphics are nothing to scoff at either, despite the environments being a little sparse at times. The colors are bright, and the models are smooth. The characters look gorgeous and well crafted, and it was nice to see Raiden's reactions to things playing out through his expressions as well as through his words.

The game also has a lot of replay value. Between the increased difficulty that makes the difference between Hard and Very Hard seem like entirely different games and all the un-lockable weapons, costumes, and VR missions there's a lot of time to be had with this game. There are also the DLC missions to look forward to, one of which gives you the opportunity to play as Jetstream Sam and the other which supposed to focus on LQ-84i.

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is a fantastic game and I really recommend it to everyone!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Forget the reviews, GET THIS GAME!, November 15, 2014
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This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
Awesome Graphics. Great Gameplay and Depth. Interesting Story invoking some great philosophical thought on war. Replayability. FREE Meaningful Campaign DLC (on PSN at least). At under $10 buying this game is a no-brainer whether you've played Metal Gear titles in the past or not. This game is so underrated it's stupid. Buy this game now, you will not be displeased.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good action game, April 1, 2013
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This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
I enjoyed it but found it to be a bit off from the gear stories from previous games, this seemed almost an arcade type game compared to the other titles. All in all enjoyed it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another crazy action gem from Platinum Games, March 29, 2013
By 
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is best not thought of as another entry into the Metal Gear series, but as another Platinum action game. Platinum has emerged this generation as one of the absolute finest developers of frantic, crazy, yet wonderfully crafted action games. Their previous 2 releases, Bayonetta and Vanquish, are among the absolute best in their respective genres, and while Metal Gear Rising doesn't quite reach the heights of those games, it's still a must-play for any fan of action games of this type.

In Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, you take control of the cyborg ninja Raiden, star of Metal Gear Solid 2, and the scene-stealer from Metal Gear Solid 4. The plot in this game, like in all of Platinum's games, is pretty absurd and and the developers seem to know it. There are some Metal Gear-esque moments in the plot here, but don't expect anything remotely close to the brilliance on display in Hideo Kojima's Metal Gear Solid games. This game is all about the gameplay, and in that regard MGR delivers.

Metal Gear Rising's combat reminded me of Bayonetta's to a degree. While it doesn't quite nail that silky smoothness that Bayonetta did, Metal Gear Rising's combat is still incredibly fast, deep, and exciting. Raiden is an extremely capable fighter in the hands of a gamer who takes the time to learn how Raiden works. There's a learning curve here, but once you get past it, Raiden will feel like an extension of the player, slicing and dicing enemies to shreds. One thing that will take some getting used to is the Parry command, which takes the place of the traditional dodge move that most action games of this type utilize. It's rough at first, but once you learn how it works, you'll appreciate how it leaves enemies vulnerable to counterattacks. You'll be scored after each battle on how well you performed, encouraging replayability. The core battle mechanic centers around a "blade mode" where everything moves into slow motion and Raiden can use the right analog stick to slice enemies into pieces from any angle, including the ability to hit vital organs which refuel Raiden's energy. It's a brilliant mechanic that never gets old throughout the entire campaign.

The game performs extremely well, too. The game runs at a smooth 60 frames per second, which makes all the combat and crazy happenings all around Raiden look even better. Aside from some really bad music during certain battles, the game sounds great as well. The game's major weakness is the camera, which seems to sit a bit too close behind Raiden, and can get really wonky at times.

Overall, Metal Gear Rising is an easy recommendation to action gamers who like depth to their combat and are willing to put in some time to learn how the game works. Like Bayonetta and Vanquish, this is a game that rewards patient gamers who work to build their skill and aren't expecting a game with pick-up-and-play combat like Darksiders or God of War. Very fun and fast-paced game! I had a great time with it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Become a Cyborg Ninja and cut down all who oppose you, March 15, 2013
By 
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
What Metal Gear Solid fan hasn't dreamed of actually being able to play as a Cyborg Ninja at least once? Ever since I first laid eyes on Gray Fox, the first Cyborg Ninja in the original Metal Gear Solid, I've always wished for the opportunity to play as him. Then, when Cyborg Ninja Raiden made his debut in Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots and left our mouths agape with his impressive sword skills and insane acrobatics, my desire to play as a Cyborg Ninja rose even higher. I wanted to wield the blade of a Cyborg Ninja myself and take part in all the slicing and the dicing, not just watch all the action unfold in cutscenes (as cool as they were). Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance finally gave me that chance. Looking at it from a purely objective standpoint, this game does have a few niggling little flaws here and there, but they weren't nearly bad enough to take away my admiration for what is a truly fun game with intense action and satisfying combat. Picking up four years after MGS 4, this game starts with Raiden back in active cybernetic duty and working for the PMC (Private Military Company) known as Maverick Security. While escorting an important Prime Minister through the streets of Africa, their caravan is attacked by cyborgs working with Desperado Enforcement, another PMC that has absolutely no qualms about using excessive violence to complete their missions.

As Raiden cuts his way through a bunch of enemy cyborgs and even a beefed-up Metal Gear RAY, he gets his bionic rear handed to him by Jetstream Sam, a cyborg samurai (and Raiden's token main rival) working for Desperado. Afterwards, Raiden gets a new and improved cybernetic body and goes on a new mission to stop Desperado's evil schemes and exact his "revengeance" (whatever that means). Let me come right out and say that as a fan of MGS's superb story, I wasn't expecting the story for Revengeance to even compare to the ones in the previous games, but I was still hoping for some more background info on Raiden and his past, like more specifics on how he first became a cyborg or his life as a child soldier. Aside from multiple references to the Patriots and Solidus Snake, as well as a certain character from MGS 4 making a short appearance in this game, there actually aren't that many story elements connecting Revengeance to the previous games (I'm well aware that this game is more of a spin-off than a direct sequel, but I still would have liked a couple of flashbacks showing more of Raiden's past). As it is, the story we get is still decent, despite the fact that Raiden is pretty much the only guy in the game to go through any form of worthwhile character development.

So, how's the combat in this game? Well, it's actually quite fun and entertaining. Some of its execution though does take some getting used to. As one would expect from a game developed by Platinum Games, Revengeance has the same kind of high-speed and adrenaline rushed action as Vanquish (another hit title developed by Platinum Games). The biggest difference here is that you're slicing up enemies with a sword instead of shooting them with a bunch of guns. Raiden chiefly makes use of his high frequency blade to cut down wave after wave of enemies. He has quite the laundry list of moves and combos available to him, and more can be purchased with experience points you get from defeating enemies and completing objectives, along with upgrades towards health, energy, and weapon damage. A lot of the combos involve a fair bit of button mashing, but some more useful, specialized combos require more precise button and joystick inputs. Too much use of button mashing will actually get you killed since you will have to make frequent use of parrying to defend yourself from enemy attacks.

Raiden can parry almost every kind of attack thrown at him from enemies, no matter how small or big they are (and in some cases, no matter how HUGE they are). The parrying itself could have used a bit of work though. You have to press the attack (square) button and push the joystick towards the enemy attacking you in order to parry/block the attack, and you have to parry each individual attack to boot (holding down the square button and keeping the joystick angled towards the enemy won't work). The parrying functions well enough, but it takes a lot of time to master. If your timing is off by too much, then you'll end up swinging your sword towards your enemy instead of parrying their attack, which could lead to disastrous results in certain boss battles. I for one would have preferred to be able to parry with the joystick and the R1 button instead of the square button. Raiden has a dodge move that can be upgraded to a slicing dodge, but the game kind of goes out of its way to not let you know that you even possess a dodge move; either way, the dodge move is rather slow. Despite the fact that Raiden can parry almost any attack, there are a small number of specialized attacks that he cannot defend himself against, and they leave him with little time to run away from his enemies before the attacks connect.

Still, if you can do an especially well-timed parry, an icon will appear telling you to enter Blade Mode, where everything around Raiden will slow down greatly and you can use the right stick to set up the angle of Raiden's sword with pinpoint precision. Releasing the right stick will have Raiden swing his sword and cut through his enemy (he can remove their limbs, slice them in half, or just cut them up into confetti). You can also enter Blade Mode manually with the L1 button instead of waiting for the icon to pop up on the screen, but it's normally better to do so when there are only one or two enemies around since others can attack you from off-screen when you're busy focusing on your current target. Plus, once Raiden's energy meter goes down to 75%, then Blade Mode loses its slow motion effect, which will leave him incredibly vulnerable to all manner of beatings from surrounding enemies. One very useful application for Blade Mode is to cut into specific points on vulnerable enemies; after hitting the right spot, Raiden can yank out his targets' synthetic spinal columns and crush them in his hand to absorb their essences, which lets him regain massive amounts of health and energy (but he can also make use of health items if he's in a jam). Much like with parrying, mastering Blade Mode also takes a lot of practice, but it still works quite well.

Raiden's Ninja Run ability lets him run around at extremely high speeds and do things like trip up smaller enemies with a sliding dash (opening them up to a Blade Mode attack), automatically deflect bullets, and traverse uneven terrain and small walls without breaking his stride. Later in the game, when he has a full energy meter, Raiden will be able to temporarily enter Ripper Mode, where his basic attacks and combos will do the same amount of damage as Blade Mode attacks. Furthermore, he will gain access to other melee weapons as you progress through the game: an unusual polearm that can damage multiple enemies at once, a magnetic sai that can hit distant enemies, and a pair of high frequency "machete-shears" that are incredibly slow, yet powerful. Raiden can also make use of sub-weapons such as missile launchers, grenades, EMP grenades, etc. These weapons all work well and can prove useful at times, but switching to them is rather cumbersome. There's no way to do any quick switching between different weapons, instead you have to access a separate item screen to select the weapons and other items. This normally wouldn't have been a problem for me, but unfortunately Raiden has to be standing still in order to open up the item screen (if he's running, parrying, or attacking, you can't access the screen).

While you chiefly will be fighting against several enemies at once in this game, it is possible to use stealth to take out some enemies from behind or above. The stealth in this game is not nearly as in-depth or involved as in the previous Metal Gear games (though that's to be expected by now, don't you think?). Still, you can use the classic cardboard boxes and oil drums to hide from enemies, and even use hologram projectors to distract enemies for a few seconds (they work just like the girly magazines in the previous Metal Gear games). To further aid you in the stealth department, Raiden's visor gives him access to Augment Mode, which lets him see through walls and obstacles and highlights enemies in red (it basically works just like Detective Mode from the Batman games). At best, you'll be able to use stealth to take out 1 to 3 enemies before the rest notice you and attack you en masse, and since some enemies can follow you wherever you go, even on rooftops, trying to lose them until the alert mode expires is usually an exercise in futility. Basically, it's better to use stealth simply to whittle away a certain number of enemies so you don't have to fight as many when the chaos eventually begins.

One thing I should mention here is the game's not so good camera. It's definitely not the worst camera I've ever seen (I'm looking at you Ninja Gaiden), but it tends to look away from enemies during combat, although it's much worse during moments of stealth. More specifically, when Raiden is hiding under a cardboard box or oil drum and an enemy starts coming close, the camera insists on looking away from the enemy and towards Raiden's hiding spot unless you move it back towards the approaching enemy again. Either way, most of you won't want to focus so much on the stealth anyway when the combat is so much more gratifying. One specific moment where stealth is pretty much required is when Raiden hijacks a Dwarf Gekko and uses it to sneak into some research facility. The Dwarf Gekko will quickly get demolished in a direct confrontation against even one cyborg, but luckily it can knock cyborgs unconscious from behind with an electric shock.

Many quick time events are included in this game's combat, normally after stunning regular enemies or during boss battles. There are also certain high speed and over-the-top set pieces where Raiden will be doing such things as running up or down the sides of skyscrapers at high speeds while avoiding projectiles and falling debris which are truly incredible to witness (though some do require a fair bit of trial and error). The different number of enemies Raiden encounters put up decent fights. He'll face other cyborgs, Gekko (from MGS 4), robotic wolves armed with chainsaw tails or back mounted rail guns, gorilla-like robots with arm mounted machine guns, robotic raptors with bladed feet, and other mechanical freaks. Even the basic cyborg enemies offer a decent challenge in large numbers. The boss fights take things even further and become progressively more challenging as you go further in the game. In true Platinum Games form, the final boss will provide the toughest challenge.

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is the slightest bit short in length (about 7 or 8 hours), but also like it's older brother Vanquish, its shortness and fantastic gameplay combine to give the game high replay value. There are some extra VR missions that increase the playtime somewhat, but they're mostly just momentary distractions. If you're like me and you've always wanted to play as a Cyborg Ninja from Metal Gear Solid, or if you just like hack and slash games with a little something extra thrown in, then this is the game for you. Those of you who only enjoyed the stealth aspect from the other MGS games most likely won't enjoy this game (apparently some people are still unaware that this isn't a stealth-based Metal Gear game). Personally, I like both action and stealth, hence my high praise for this game. If you go into this game expecting less classic Metal Gear Solid gameplay and prepare yourself for what can be considered as "Ninja Raiden", then chances are you'll love it, despite its minor issues. At the very least, this game is worth a quick weekend rental.

**Update**
This next part will cover the two DLCs for Revengeance: Jetstream and Blade Wolf. The first one, Jetstream, puts you in control of Raiden's rival from the main game, Jetstream Sam. Taking place before the main game and before Sam joined Desperado Enforcement, this DLC opens with Sam challenging Desperado's mother company, World Marshal, and infiltrating its headquarters to put an end to their war profiteering. Storywise, there's nothing all that surprising or attention grabbing in this game until you reach the end. Even so, we're never shown any real reason as to why Sam ends up joining World Marshal in the first place, it kind of just "happens". But, just like the combat in the main game, the combat in this DLC is just as fast paced and unforgiving as you'd expect. Sam controls much the same way as Raiden and can use his Muramasa sword to slice up many enemies with relative ease, and he can also make use of Blade Mode and the Zandatsu move, slicing open enemies and yanking out their synthetic spinal columns to regain precious health and energy. Parrying once again plays a major role in staying alive. While you can surprise enemies from behind, Sam is unable to perform stealth kills. Some of you may not appreciate this, while most probably won't care.

Sam has his own Ninja Run that lets him run at high speeds, although it doesn't let him automatically leap over small walls and obstacles. Fortunately, he has a double jump that makes up for his slightly inferior Ninja Run. Sam also has an improved dodge move which is faster and more fluid than Raiden's (this dodge move is actually crucial to surviving the final boss). One big improvement in this DLC is that you can access the item menu to use sub-weapons and recovery items while Sam is fighting or jumping around, unlike in the main game where Raiden had to stand perfectly still to access the menu. Sam even has a taunt that makes enemies momentarily more aggressive, but also makes them more susceptible to his blade attacks. The enemies in the DLC are the exact same ones that appear in the main game. Even the three boss battles in this DLC are the same as three particular bosses that Raiden fought in the main game. That's not all so bad though, since all the enemies are at the very least just as tough as they've ever been, some even more so. The final boss once again proves to be the most challenging (and cheap) enemy by far. Even though Jetstream is only about 1 to 2 hours long, it's worth it if you were a big fan of the high speed action in the main game.

The second DLC puts you in control of the titular Blade Wolf. This one takes place just before Blade Wolf's encounter with Raiden in the main game, back when he was known as LQ-84i. Seeing what befell the mechanical canine before his fateful encounter with Raiden was actually rather interesting and helps provide a more insightful look into Blade Wolf's character. His tail...excuse me, his tale begins with him undergoing intense VR training under the watchful eye of Mistral (whom gamers will remember as one of the bosses from the main game), and from the very beginning you get to see how Blade Wolf actually controls somewhat differently from both Raiden and Sam, or to be more precise, how he feels different from them. Blade Wolf can dash around at high speeds and slice up opponents with his high frequency chainsaw, with which he can do the classic Blade Mode and Zandatsu moves to cut open his enemies and absorb their essences through their synthetic spinal columns. He can even do stealth kills on enemies and see their locations through walls with Augment Mode just like Raiden (Sam couldn't do either of these things).

While Blade Wolf does have a lot of the same moves the other two characters have, he also feels heavier and less "floaty"; to put it differently, his attacks are slower, but they appear to be somewhat stronger (even his Blade Mode attacks are slower). Blade Wolf can use recovery items and different grenade sub-weapons like the other characters, however he can also use his own heat knife sub-weapons to attack enemies from a distance. Parrying and dodging are again crucial to survival when fighting enemies, most of which are again the same types of enemies encountered in the main game and in Jetstream. The only different enemy is the one boss that you fight at the end, and while it is a somewhat challenging battle, it's certainly not one of the more difficult ones either. Blade Wolf was a fun DLC, unfortunately it was also far too short. It's actually only about half as long as Jetstream, so most gamers should be able to beat it in no more than an hour and fifteen minutes. I liked this DLC, but its short length makes it a bit of a disappointment. At the very least, this DLC is cheaper than Jetstream, so Revengeance purists may find it to be worth playing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Game, Short Yet Easily Replayable, March 11, 2013
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This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
The game is a literal blast, and I would recommend it to all action game fans. The gameplay is more like newer Ninja Gaiden games than older Devil May Cry games, but it encompasses both flawlessly. The campaign itself is only 6-7 hours long, but has tons of replay value, both from unlocking all the weapons and trying it on different difficulties. The story is also "Hideo Kojima-y". I've actually been playing it for over 30 hours already!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different kind of metal Gear, March 7, 2013
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (and Yeah...no points from me on that unwieldy title) is a quasi-sequel to Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots. Rather than feature usual Metal Gear character Solid Snake MGR:R stars the cyborg ninja Raiden, the katana-wielding ally of Solid Snake. Initially, you control him in his "White" form, which was based on his appearance in Guns of the Patriots, where he is depicted as wearing white armor. At a certain point in the game he switches to the more powerful "Black" cyborg armor variant.

The game takes place four years after the events in Guns of the Patriots as Raiden is working for Maverick Enterprises as a mercenary in order to raise money for his family. He assists in training troops as well as various private security missions guarding VIPs. The protagonist in the game is the rival Desperado Enterprises, a company involved in terrorist attacks. Their leader named Sundowner, kidnaps a man that Raiden was protecting. Raiden tries to rescue the man but is too late and the man is killed while Raiden is defeated by one of Desperado's top operatives. It is then that Raiden is outfitted with his more powerful black armor so he can seek his revenge against Desperado and its army of robots and cyborgs. Ultimately he will face off against the "Winds of Destruction", i.e. your various bosses with pitched battles that take place in large, open areas.

Besides the main character the other major change is that MGR:R is a pure hack-n-slash action game as opposed to the typical Metal Gear stealth play. The game introduces a cutting system that is used much like your typical shooter. You have an aiming reticle in order to target the weak spots on an opponent, such as gaps in their armor, or on items like pillars you can cut in order to collapse parts of building on enemies. This mode, referred to as "blade mode" also has a time-slowing function like the bullet-time ability of Max Payne. This gives you the opportunity to line up your aiming reticle and map out your attacks for precision hits. This results in some truly fearsome attacks as you chop and dismember limbs and heads in a slow-motion dance of death. Blade mode can also be utilizes as a defensive strategy to deflect incoming missile attacks. This all adds up to being able to pull off a variety stylized multi-hit combos which are enormously satisfying.

Blade mode also garners Raiden much needed energy as well as the ability to take the enemy's weapons, ammo, and other items. The deft cyborg ninja shows off his other skills with a Ninja Dash that increases his speed and climbing ability which comes in quite handy when setting up your enemies for an ambush attack. There's also a "Ripper Mode" which can be obtained in the game which is a short term power-up that can be used in conjunction with Blade mode to make you a devastating killing machine.

At the end of each level you will be rewarded with a specific amount of points depending your performance during the level and will receive a grade, with the highest being "S". These points allow you to purchase upgrades for Raiden's equipment.

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is a fairly short game at maybe 6 - 8 hours tops but that period is filled with non-stop, button-mashing, combo delivering excitement. The combat and control system is so smooth and natural that you'll barely have time to notice the game's weak points. But I will mention them anyway...These include ultimately an ordinary storyline that fails to draw you in. Yes it's fun to whirl your blades through legions of enemies but it's even better when there's a strong story to back-up the action. There's also some camera issues that can mess with your orientation but overall MGR: R is a fun and addictive diversion to the usual Metal Gear gameplay.

Tim Janson Mania Entertainment ([...])
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing game, must have for action/ Metal Gear fans., March 3, 2013
By 
Anton (IRVINE, CA, US) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Video Game)
One word to sum up this game - Cool. Cool is exactly how I felt throughout the entire time playing through the game. Quick, stylish, accessible yet deep, if you enjoy high paced action or Metal Gear in general, you must get this. Mind you, this is more action, not stealth based, and Raiden is simply fantastic.
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Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance
Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance by Konami (PlayStation 3)
$19.99 $9.68
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