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Metal Men: How Marc Rich Defrauded the Country, Evaded the Law, and Became the World's Most Sought-After Corporate Criminal Paperback – Bargain Price, April 3, 2001


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Paperback, Bargain Price, April 3, 2001
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--This text refers to the Kindle Edition edition.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial (April 3, 2001)
  • ISBN-10: 006097060X
  • ASIN: B000H2N5YY
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,149,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Marc Rich is one of the most successful traders of metals and other minerals. He is also now living in Switzerland, wanted in the United States for tax evasion. While Copetas's book is ostensibly about Rich and his questionable dealings, it also gives a fairly interesting account of the metals trading industry itself: individualistic, barely regulated, tense, fast-paced, potentially lucrative, and often shady. The character and atmosphere of Phillip Brothers, the trading house where Rich got his start, and of Rich's own firm are nicely contrasted and delineated. Neither Rich nor the metal trading industry come off very well. For larger business collections. Stuart Gudowitz, George Washington Univ. Lib., Washington, D.C.
Copyright 1985 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Reads like a mystery novel [and] provides a fascinating look behind the scenes of the commodities trading snake pit." -- -- USA Today

"The story itself is astonishing -- and appalling." -- -- John Train, Wall Street Journal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

For interested readers and traders alike.
Luc REYNAERT
Mr. Copetas has written a highly readable and informative book.
Julie
Mark Rich has to one of the worlds best businessmen.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT on June 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
A. Craig Copetas' book gives us a rare insight in the well curtained offices of big metal traders. His story centres on Marc Rich and his companion Pincus Green, who left in disgust their employer Philipp Brothers, at that moment a unit of Engelhard MC, because of the 'meagre' bonuses they received at the end of the year. These bonuses were in fact only a fraction of the revenues the two traders generated for the company.
The new company they created attacked immediately and head-on the core businesses of their former employer.
Craig Copetas shows us how Marc Rich's commodity trading business was based on 'deep' contacts (Henry Kissinger), market cornering, tax evasion, and profiting most of all by circumventing a US oil embargo against Iran.
Attacked in court for unlawful trading and tax evasion Marc Rich's companies pleaded guilty to 38 counts to the tune of ninety million dollars, still a small portion of the amassed fortune. Fines of $50,000 a day were disbursed without the slightest difficulty.
When he was finally condemned, Marc Rich had already settled down in Zug (Switzerland) with a Spanish identity card.
He was ultimately pardoned (he risked a potential jail term of over three hundred years!) by President Bill Clinton (for generously supporting the Democratic Party?).
This book is a keen look behind the curtain of a highly speculative and risky business, where the best informed traders corner the least informed ones. Options should limit the risks.
For interested readers and traders alike.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
The commodity trading profession has very few books written about it. This is one of the better books but you must decipher what the truth is and what is fictitious. Copetas speculates alot about the life of Marc Rich and takes alot of pot shots at his career. Truth is Copetas is an outsider and outsiders can not accurately report about covert and clandestine physical commodity trades. I should know....I worked for the best metal man in the world.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Janet@qkd.com on January 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
The book was absolutely intrigueing and compelling just to learn about the inside workings of the metals and oil business. Needless to say, I worked at this company for a short period of time... I did not see any of the implied pimping of secretaries or traders prostituting themselves for a deal. The author has gathered much information on the sequence of events, but found that he was presenting this story, not as a reporter, but a snotty bitter little man. Marc, did not have shifty eyes, and to say at 6ft, his presence was that of a tall and looming personality, makes me believe that this author is of short stature. There are many good and charitable things this man and his company have catered to, but not once did i see anything listed in this book. The people I worked for and with at this company, were a group of the nicest and most professional people I have worked for. I have since to find a company that performed in such a refined and distinguished manner. They werent the whores Copetas has implied them to be. My being a secretary there, I took quite offense to the pimping of the staff for info. This is business, but just someone working by a different set of rules. Broke some, now cant come to the country whose rules he broke. Unless, the Pardon sticks. And wouldnt that be something to really irk this author a little more than he already seems to be. His being a "journalist", I was surprised by his unprofessionalism in giving the facts. All the facts, and not his opinions.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
The brevity of Copetas' book allows it to be mercifully readable. On the other hand, Metal Men is so condensed that federal prosecution of Marc Rich (who managed to become a Spaniard in order to avoid extradition) and Pincus Green (who became a Bolivian for the same reason) is difficult to follow. The best sections of the book are the juicy nuggets that leave the reader whetted for more information. This is especially true when Marc Rich's relationship with Henry Kissinger and Kissinger Associates is discussed. Marc refers to the good doctor as "K", perhaps an allusion to Franz Kafka's narrator in the book Schloss. How appropriate. Clearly there was, and perhaps still is, much mutual benefit in the relationship between two master players who operate at the same level in their respective games. Copetas would not be faulted if he enlarged on this particular topic. One might wish for more background on the peculiar relationship the wholesome country of Switzerland has had with mobsters, white collar crime of a certain calibre, and kleptocratic despots over the past decades, if not centuries. The enchanting Canton of Zug emerges as an especially infested banana republic within a national governmental system that sees all money as created equal, and equally welcome into its banking system, regardless of provenance. This is a far cry from the Switzerland of alpine cheeses, pure air, teutonic ski bums, and clinics for the super rich. More the Gnome Switzerland of secrets and Croesus grade wealth and grey teflon coated bureaucrats. Then there hints at generally unreported connections, such as a strong, if not well known, presence Swedes in Thailand. Swedes in Thailand ? We would like to know more.Read more ›
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