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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anti-Futurism...
When people think about Metropolis, the one from Germany or Japan, they think Futurism. But in fact the movies, plus this manga are about bringing the human INTO the society. Futurism is about speeding, shiny cars without humans slowing things down or getting in the way. But Metropolis is about humanity and mercy and the human heart. Even Michi was built with a heart,...
Published on November 18, 2008 by Michael Valdivielso

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good for Tezuka fans
This book is becoming increasingly hard to find, so get it while you can. An early work by Osamu Tezuka, it's the middle graphic novel in his loose trilogy of sci-fi books he did (the others being Lost World and Nextworld). The art is wonderful, but the story is not one of Tezuka's best, despite containing a lot of pathos. It's more interesting as a curiosity of his...
Published 12 months ago by R. Smith


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anti-Futurism..., November 18, 2008
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This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
When people think about Metropolis, the one from Germany or Japan, they think Futurism. But in fact the movies, plus this manga are about bringing the human INTO the society. Futurism is about speeding, shiny cars without humans slowing things down or getting in the way. But Metropolis is about humanity and mercy and the human heart. Even Michi was built with a heart, a symbol of hope in a machine designed as a super being. This story just cannot be compared to the films or any other work of art. And it is a work of art that EVERYBODY should read at least once in their lifetime, like 1984, Brave New World, or Dandelion Wine.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars manga new to you? this book is a good start., June 9, 2008
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This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
When a story contains a couple of cliches you imagine them as the author's lapse but when a story seems composed entirely of cliches you suspect the author has had a breakthrough. That is my sense of METROPOLIS by Osamu Tezuka. Everything essential to comics is somehow gathered here. It is an excellent tour of the cartoon dimension.

Anyone at all familiar with the beginnings of American comic strips and animations will delight in this book, just as clearly as Tezuka delighted in those early American gems. The art of this book is part Fleischer Brothers cartoon, part McManus's "Bringing Up Father" and just as insanely manic as you would imagine a combination of those two to be.

It's what you always hope for from cartoons -- sort of a shared dream, the panels are crowded with cartoon figures seemingly poured from the subconscious. Crazy on the surface, full of disturbing idiosyncrasies, but somehow resonantly true. The turn the story takes was remarkably alarming, moving and effective. All the more so for the Astroboy Betty Boopish artwork.

This is not close to the 2001 movie version. This is immeasurably better than the movie version. Take a look. You'll be surprised.
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4.0 out of 5 stars All the sci-fi genres in a single book, January 7, 2007
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Gagewyn (United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
This was a mixed bag, somewhat like a self effacing B-movie. The story contains many generic plot lines all intersecting together: evil villain who wants to control a super being, robot army rebels, bumbling police, giant animals caused by radiation, and on and on. These plots are very condensed, but they are meant to be cliches and Tezuka pokes fun at them. The main plot concerns Michi, an artificial human who thinks he/she (gender can switch at the push of a button) is real. Michi was designed under pressure from the evil Baron Red, but hidden away by his/her kindly inventor who doesn't want Michi used for evil. Baron Red soon discovers that Michi lives and tries to catch Michi. Meanwhile other characters pull through cliched sci-fi plots which somehow all trace back to Baron Red's doings.

The plot description doesn't sound so hot, however the comic is actually pretty good. There are tons of kind of corny one liners that somehow work. These reminded me a bit of things that Snowy from TinTin might say or do. Because most of the comic pokes fun at the genres it runs through, I wasn't sure how seriously to take Michi. For the most part Michi is treated as good hearted and wanting to meet his/her father. So at the end when Michi's classmates "shake hands" I didn't know if that was supposed to be an emotional moment or a bit more over the top tongue in cheek.

It's hard to explain because the one liners and jumbled plot don't sound appealing to me, but this was actually a pretty good read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good for Tezuka fans, February 23, 2014
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This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
This book is becoming increasingly hard to find, so get it while you can. An early work by Osamu Tezuka, it's the middle graphic novel in his loose trilogy of sci-fi books he did (the others being Lost World and Nextworld). The art is wonderful, but the story is not one of Tezuka's best, despite containing a lot of pathos. It's more interesting as a curiosity of his earlier work and example of the mature themes he would work with for the rest of his career. Of particular note is the artificial being Michi, who possesses super powers and is Tezuka's prototype for the later creation of Astro Boy. Oh, and this book has very little resemblance to the animated version of Metropolis, so be aware of that.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Metropolis is tons of fun!, December 20, 2007
This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
This book, without saying, is so much fun.
It's not like to 2001 movie counterpart, but it's the original story.
Honestly, I think it's better.

It's a great book. Get it today!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Like the Movie At All, June 2, 2003
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This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
This has the usual well-done and entertaining Tezuka artwork and humor, but if you are looking for the book form of the excellent movie that was supposedly based on this you may be disappointed. Beyond the title and some of the main characters, the two bear almost no resemblance. Taken on its own merit, it is a fun and very quick read. If you like the Astro Boy books, you will almost certainly enjoy this.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting story., November 12, 2003
This review is from: Metropolis (Paperback)
Beyond the title and a few characters, this story has little to do with the animated feature, but it still is worth reading.
The story takes place in Metropolis. Duke Red, a bad guy, is being chased and everyone is to be on the lookout for him. Mr. Mustachio is chasing him. During the chase a scientist invents artificial cells and builds a robot/person who escapes and has adventures as a "real" person.
The art is typical Tezuka in the Betty Boop/Popey style. The story is fun to read. Scenes of Miki flying through Metropolis are reminicient of Superman flying through Metropolis.
Next World was better, but this book is still worth reading if you enjoy Tezuka, Astro Boy, or cartoons from the 20's through 40's.
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Metropolis
Metropolis by Osamu Tezuka (Paperback - April 22, 2003)
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