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Mexico: Why a Few Are Rich and the People Poor Hardcover – August 24, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (August 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520262352
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520262355
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,416,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Impassioned and stimulating.”
(Survival 2011-06-10)

From the Inside Flap

"Professor Ramón Eduardo Ruiz has dedicated his career to unlocking the historical reasons for the rebelliousness of Mexican society and its failures to achieve great goals behind those bursts of collective energy and idealism. This book is a culmination of rigorous scholarship and a moral commitment to confronting all aspects of the Mexican people. There is also an element of hope in these pages that Mexico will become a prosperous, just and viable society."—Lorenzo Meyer, El Colegio de México

"In Mexico, Ramón Eduardo Ruiz brings a lifetime of study and a passionate love of his subject to bear on the most vexing puzzle any historian of Mexico can confront: Why should a country so rich in potential remain perennially mired in poverty, corruption, and injustice? This is a bold, angry, and absolutely indispensable book."—Timothy J. Henderson, author of The Mexican Wars for Independence

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By beto on October 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For some reason it doesn't have all the sections numbered I don't no if its an old copy or a newer one
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By PR on July 11, 2013
Format: Paperback
Professor Ruiz knew more about Mexico than most of his contemporaries based on years of personal experience. With a Ph.D. from Berkeley, he began those years of observation with solid preparation.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gustavo on January 31, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first three chapters of the book, those dealing with the historical aspects of poverty in Mexico are very interesting and informative, but when it comes closer to modern history of Mexico, is very innaccurate to say the least. For example in 1994-1995 there was an economic crisis (again) and banks in Mexico had to be "rescued" through "FOBAPROA", a fund stablished 1990 by the "Ley de Instituciones de Crédito" (Credit Institutions Law), article 122 of that Law created the FOBAPROA. Of course many bankers abused this fund. But the author in this case wrote that Zedillo, president at that time, rescued banks without consulting Congress, it was a fund already stablished and all major political parties agreed to it. Also that fund was created long before Zedillo was elected president.
Also draws my attention that the author blames not only big corporations on the poverty prevailing, but present day politicians, but he barely touches with the petal of a rose two of the WORST presidents Mexico has had: Luis Echeverría Álvarez and José López Portillo.
Also very confusing is the fact that the author criticizes the lack of import tariffs to protect its industry.., but in other chapters criticizes that mexican goverment protected certain industries stablishing import tariffs.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Richard Coulson on March 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After trying to dissect the author's endless criticisms of the way that various Mexican Governments, from left to right, have mishandled the economy, I can come to only one conclusion: he believes that all the leaders were infected by the ideas and habits brought over from Europe during the conquest nearly 500 years ago. All would have been well if the Spaniards had never arrived, or had been defeated and ejected by the Aztecs. Then the "Indian" way of life would have prevailed and would have brought the indigenous masses of Mexicans into a fair, egalitarian and reasonably prosperous condition right up to the present day, without the present great distinctions of wealth and poverty, without NAFTA, without the neoliberal business and government leaders who emphasize how "white" they are. The author is entitled to his thesis, but it is far-fetched at best.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kim on November 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is extremely informative, I learned so much about Mexico. At times, it can be a bit dry but overall, it's definitely worth your time.
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