Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism (New Edition) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Michael Jordan and the Ne... has been added to your Cart
Condition: :
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. It may be marked, have identifying markings on it, or show other signs of previous use.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism Paperback – April 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0393320374 ISBN-10: 0393320375

Buy New
Price: $12.95
11 New from $6.62 50 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $9.96
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, April 1, 2000
$12.95
$6.62 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$6.00

There is a newer edition of this item:

Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$12.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism + Raceball: How the Major Leagues Colonized the Black and Latin Game + Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Made a Nation
Price for all three: $41.33

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 191 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393320375
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393320374
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,558,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Not everyone embraces the "American Way." But as historian Walter LaFeber demonstrates in this highly original look at the effects of global capitalism, not everyone has a choice. Using powerful communications satellites in the 1980s and, later, unbridled capital, transnational corporations such as McDonald's and Nike and their media-mogul counterparts have infiltrated cultures from Paris to Beijing, understanding perfectly that what the world sees the world buys (in this case, Big Macs and anything plastered with a Nike swoosh). Of course, it helps when hoops legend Michael Jordan--the world's most idolized athlete--is pitching your products. His influence is pervasive: "McDonald's, blaring Michael Jordan's endorsement, operated in 103 nations and fed one percent of the world's population each day. 'Within the East Asian urban environment,' one historian of the firm notes, 'McDonald's fills a niche once occupied by the teahouse, the neighborhood shop, the street-side stall, and the park bench.'"

LaFeber transitions smoothly from Michael Jordan biography to socioeconomic commentary, first exploring Jordan as the great American hero, then turning a critical eye on Nike and its shoddy overseas labor practices. Jordan can certainly sell shoes, but at what cost? In the final chapter heading, LaFeber asks whether Michael Jordan is the "Greatest Endorser of the Twentieth Century" or "An Insidious Form of Imperialism." He presents evidence of both, but ultimately The New Global Capitalism becomes less about Jordan's marketing prowess than America's influence over the world's consumer habits, and, subsequently, the havoc that power can wreak. LaFeber's short (164 pages), lucid study gives readers a fresh perspective on the battle between capital and culture. Recommended. --Rob McDonald --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

What could be more awe inspiring than the image of Michael JordanAshaved head shining, tongue waggling, basketball cockedAhanging in the air as he glides in to dunk? Try global communication technology that allows kids in the Canary Islands to watch NBA games in real time and use the Internet to order Nike shoes so they can be like Mike. In assessing the recently retired star's ascent from basketball phenom to international marketing phenomenon, LaFeber (The Clash, etc.) views Jordan as the harbinger of a new kind of capitalism fueled by information-age media. It's a world in which American transnational companies like Nike have learned to establish brand consciousness with worldwide social and economic impact. Jordan's career corresponded with and was fueled by the emergence of CNN, the Internet and aggressive worldwide marketing. To put Jordan in context, LaFeber links the history of basketball with America's century of economic dominance and writes entertainingly about the development of the sport into a multi-billion-dollar business with licensing spinoffs. He also asks tough questions about Jordan's responsibility as a public figure ("politically neutered," in Arthur Ashe's phrase) and his muted, awkward reaction to Nike's much criticized labor practices in developing countries. Readers who thought that some necessary cultural criticism was missing from David Halberstam's Playing for Keeps (Forecasts, Jan. 18) will find that LaFeber, a Cornell historian, has written the chapter Halberstam neglected and has expanded it into a thought-provoking reflection on the relationship between Jordan and globalization. (Aug.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

This book was absolutely riveting.
Jason D
Behold, before you lies 120+ pages of unabashed praise of Michael Jordan with no trace of the analysis or juxtaposition promised in the preface.
Magnus Lindkvist
Lafeber really shows you how putting time and effort into something can really take you far in life.
Lisa Gaynor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "radioactive_lemming" on April 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Those who want to know what the WTO and IMF protest are about can start with this book. Lafeber's book simplifies the key issues of global corporatism (not free trade; not merely capitalism but corporatism) while relating the rise of the US with the rise of basketball. A great intro book for basketball fans who claim to not understand or care about what is Globalization. They should, but LaFeber stops short of taking a stand on the issue himself. As a historian he merely reports what happened without predicting the future. Contrary to the anonymous reviewer who panned the book as "Liberal Junk," I felt LaFeber stayed extremely neutral- which is my major problem with the book. Remove the Michael Jordan biography, and this book says what Ben Barber's 'Jihad vs. McWorld' does in 1 chapter. Except Barber explains the WHY we should care; not just what's going on in this Corporate world as LeFeber.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Winter on July 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
Walter Lafeber, a noted historian, writes about a parallel between the rise of basketball and the rise of what he calls the "New Global Capitalism." The culmination of this new capitalism is personified in the book with Michael Jordan.
In his discussion of capitalism, the author brings up some examples that point out some of the disadvantages related to capitalism. While we could argue about whether capitalism is good or bad, the author is careful in not really getting into that argument so much as he acts as a cultural critic in how America is not only spreading capitalism around the world (seen by most Americans as good), but also spreading American culture around the world (seen by me at least as not so great).
In one sense, most of the world is by now seeing the effects of American-style imperialism. The book does talk about how some have welcomed this and others have reacted harshly. I think the way that the author sees imperialism here is that America is imposing its culture on other nations. It may be at least somewhat fair to say that the people choose this fate, but economic theory would show otherwise: in a world of large companies and small companies, if a large company decides to compete directly with a small company, the large company will be the most likely winner because it is able to charge lower prices, etc. The same goes for large American companies imposing their business into other nations. Can French cafes compete with McDonalds?
The author also talks about some of Michael Jordan's pitfalls, such as not speaking out against unfair labor practices in Nike factories, or gambling with known criminals. Why did Michael Jordan have such a strong following?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peter Myers on August 23, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Noted foreign policy (global?) historian Walter LaFeber has written an extremely readable short book. The narrative flows without getting stuck in academic jargon. However, his premise that the twenty-first century will be dominated by multi-national corporations is not new. The twist is that Michael Jordan is our new Santa Claus; instead of delivering presents to "good children" throughout the world, he leaves them with symbols of products (not the presents themselves)and spreads name-brand recognition in the far corners of the earth. (In one remote region of China, the Chicago Bulls are referred to as "Red Oxen.") But haven't we heard this argument before with Ronald McDonald? He is better known in the world than the Pope. And as for Santa Claus, he can thank Coca-Cola for making him cherry red and white (the same as their soft drink label) for who he is today.
I would recommend this book to people that don't yet know that basketball commissioner David Stern packaged the NBA like Disney: "they have theme parks, and we have theme parks. Only we call them arenas. They have characters: Mickey and Goofy. Our characters are named Magic and Michael." But Walter LaFeber, who is known for his exhaustive research skills, relies too heavily on pop culture to discuss the impact of a pop figure. His endnotes are dominated by magazine and newspaper articles (Newsweek, Sports Illustrated) without delving more deeply into how a black man in America became "a god" that transcends cultural boundaries.
"Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism" is a good beginners book on the long arm of U.S. corporations but do not stop there. James Twitchell's superb "Adcult USA: The Triumph of Advertising in American Culture" provides the reader with much more indepth analysis on how Nike and others came to dominate our world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Melissa Ann Herrman on December 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
Sure, this book is about the rise of transnational corporations and the influence cultural icons such as Michael Jordan have on it. However, LaFeber never gets into WHY this is the case. He throws around the same three points throughout the 164 pages of text, leaving the reader wondering how he could possibly write so much when he realistically has nothing to say. It is more filled with statistics and dates regarding Michael Jordan, the Bulls, and Nike, than what the title implies. The book is a good read for fans of MJ and Nike, but if you're looking for a sociological perspective on globalization, look elsewhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism
This item: Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism
Price: $12.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com