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Microeconomics and Behavior Hardcover – February 24, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0072977455 ISBN-10: 0072977450 Edition: 6th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 720 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill/Irwin; 6 edition (February 24, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0072977450
  • ISBN-13: 978-0072977455
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 8.1 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #353,047 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert H. Frank received his B.S. in mathematics from Georgia Tech in 1966, then taught math and science for two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in rural Nepal. He received his M.A. in statistics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1971, and his Ph.D. in economics in 1972, also from U.C. Berkeley. He is the Goldwin Smith Professor of Economics at Cornell University, where he has taught since 1972 and where he currently holds a joint appointment in the department of economics and the Johnson Graduate School of Management. During leaves of absence from Cornell, he served as chief economist for the Civil Aeronautics Board from 1978 to 1980 and was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in 1992-93. He has published on a variety of subjects, including price and wage discrimination, public utility pricing, the measurement of unemployment spell lengths, and the distributional consequences of direct foreign investment. For the past several years, his research has focused on rivalry and cooperation in economic and social behavior. His books on these themes include Choosing the Right Pond: Human Behavior and the Quest for Status (Oxford University Press, 1985) and Passions Within Reason: The Strategic Role of the Emotions (W.W. Norton, 1988). He and Philip Cook are co-authors of The Winner-Take-All Society (The Free Press, 1995) , which received a Critic’s Choice Award and appeared on both the New York Times Notable Books list and Business Week Ten Best list for 1995. His most recent general interest publication is Luxury Fever (The Free Press, 1999). Professor Frank’s books have been translated into eight languages. He has been awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Professorship (1987 – 1990), a Kenan Enterprise Award (1993), and a Merrill Scholars Program Outstanding Educator Citation (1991).

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tyler Markowsky on May 2, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As of late, microeconomic and macroeconomic theory has been incorporating social, psychological and social-psychological theory and concepts into the fold. This makes sense, for the quantification sans-psychology (social psychology) of analysis has been poor.
This author is well-versed in this area and articulates well the concepts which are important. However, as my colleagues have stated, the book does leave much to be desired in the mathematical-sense.
I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Judgment, Choice and Rationality (defined).
This book should be included in undergraduate curriculum.
Five stars because it accomplishes what it was designed for (non-mathematical approach to microeconomics).
Regards,
Tyler Markowsky
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By tombachmann@hotmail.com on November 18, 1998
Format: Hardcover
at first glance the 750 pages of the book made me shiver. but the contents are very comprehensive a the flow is good. many examples will guide you through to more complicated topics. accompaning study guide by james halteman is not needed. -> waste of money
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Holman on May 3, 2001
Format: Hardcover
It's rare to find a text as enjoyable to read as Frank's in any subject, let alone microeconomics. The reader looking for the standard calculus-based, mathematical approach to micro should look elsewhere (Jehle and Reny is a great place to start). That's simply not the point of this text--the point is to provide the insight behind the models, as well as to promote critical thinking about the shortcomings of the traditional assumptions economists make. This text, combined with Jehle and Reny if one desires rigor as well, provides FAR more than any other single or multiple text combination available.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Burnham VINE VOICE on March 12, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was the required text for an intermediate course on microeconomics that I took as an undergraduate. Now that I'm a graduate student curling up with Mas-Colell , I miss it dearly. This is a slightly more advanced book than Gregory Mankiw's (also excellent) Principles of Microeconomics, which was my introduction to the subject. Mankiw's book requires only algebra; this one expects you to be familiar with rudimentary calculus, but keeps the math out of the way when it isn't necessary. Still, its emphasis on intuition makes it excellent preparation that will last you a lifetime of economic thinking.

Reading this book was a large part of why I decided to study this sort of thing at a graduate level. I hope you'll find it equally inspiring.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Razin on April 23, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is a fantastic book and an easy read. It bridges the gap between any basic principles of economics course and a more advanced micro theory text. A lot of the math its shed off, so if you are looking for hard core formulas...it might be a good idea to read something else or read this in combination with a more mathematically oriented book. Some chapters are engaging (like the one on the importance of Altruism) and overall the author delivers well written microeconomics reading.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mark on March 6, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I'm studying out of this book for my intermediate micro course. Simply put, the text is good (but unremarkable) for what it is: a no-nonsense bridge between the usual undergraduate principles course and graduate course in microeconomic theory. However, I can't help but feel that Frank skims off too much math in the name of accessibility. This won't help the reader looking to go further in the subject, i.e., grad or b-school. This would be okay if the appendices packed the math, but this isn't the case: the appendices are on-line at the publisher's web site, which pretty much means if you want to follow the math, you need to be near a computer. A somewhat "mathier" text, that I highly recommend, is the latest edition of Varian's Intermediate Microeconomics.
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