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Microsoft® Windows Server® 2003 TCP/IP Protocols and Services Technical Reference Hardcover – March 6, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0735612914 ISBN-10: 0735612919 Edition: 2nd ed.

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Product Details

  • Series: Technical Reference
  • Hardcover: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press; 2nd ed. edition (March 6, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0735612919
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735612914
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 2.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,744,175 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joseph Davies is an award-winning author and instructor with 18 years' experience in TCP/IP, networking, and security technologies. His books include Understanding IPV6, Second Edition and Windows Server 2008 TCP/IP Protocols and Services, and he writes the monthly column "The Cable Guy" for Microsoft TechNet.

Thomas Lee is chief technologist at the United Kingdom IT training and consulting company QA; he is also the Windows Editor for ESM magazine. He has a BS in Computer Problem Solving, is a Fellow of the British Computer Society as well as a MCSE, MCT, and MVP.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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2 star
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David Douglass on September 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a 5 star book because it takes you down to the lowest level of detail without losing you. This is primarily due to the book's excellent organization where each chapter builds on the previous ones. Although it calls itself a reference, it's an excellent sequential read to learn what TCP/IP is about under the covers on Windows Server 2003.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 14, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The original book for Windows 2000 was a great look at the underlying TCP/IP protocols. None of the how to set it up or manage it - just a no nonsense look at the underlying protocols. This approach is continued in this useful update.
Well worth the price!
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David Mc Andrew on March 4, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I'd like to say that this is a good book for the general reader who wants a broad overview of networking protocols.
But nobody buys a book like this for browsing and unfortunately it falls short when it comes to the nitty gritty details that anone working with these protocols needs.
What is the point of providing extra detail if these details prove to be misleading or in some cases even contradictory?
I know this looks like a frothing rant so I guess I need an example:
page 389 in table 16.1 the DHCP Broadcast bit in the flags entry must be set if the client does not have an IP address.
Then for the rest of the chapter all examples show the bit unset.
I know its pedantic but these books are bought for detail like this.
So in conclusion it may look good on the shelf but cannot be trusted for everyday use.
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