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131 of 137 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice keyboard for the price
Let's talk about the features Microsoft advertises on its product tour mini site.

Great comfort: It's generally more comfort than a traditional keyboard once you get used to the curved layout and thin profile keys. Don't forget to spread out your arms. Other than the surprisingly low cost (for a ergonomic keyboard), I bought it for another reason - good...
Published on September 28, 2005 by Amazon Shopper

versus
50 of 57 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars pure junk
I bought these keyboards as I like the quiet and low profile. Now I have 3 defective keyboards because some keys do not register (M, N, Caps are common). Microsoft has replaced these for free but I expressed concern that future keyboards will fail. On a Microsoft initiated customer satisfaction followup call, I told the rep that the hardware revision 1.0 is the same so...
Published on November 4, 2008 by N. Young


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131 of 137 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice keyboard for the price, September 28, 2005
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
Let's talk about the features Microsoft advertises on its product tour mini site.

Great comfort: It's generally more comfort than a traditional keyboard once you get used to the curved layout and thin profile keys. Don't forget to spread out your arms. Other than the surprisingly low cost (for a ergonomic keyboard), I bought it for another reason - good spacebar design. (Well, the spacebar on my copy of the keyboard has a problem that I'll discuss in a moment) I do touch typing and almost always use right thumb for space key. Spacebar on a traditional keyboard has sharp edge towards your thumb pad. Just put your thumb on a spacebar and you know what I'm saying here. The spacebar and all other keys on this row of the comfort curve keyboard have been tilted towards the user and have reduced thickness at the bottom so the thumb touches the flat (slightly curved) surface of the keys. Some traditional keyboards now have similar design but cost more and they are hard to get. However, the spacebar on my copy of the keyboard apparently was assembled incorrectly. The tiny metal support wire/hinge under the key is not snapped in place therefore the spacebar makes noise all the time when typing on other keys. It's easy to fix once I pry open the spacebar and snap in the metal support wire. The spacebar is still kind of loose due to its large size but no more unwanted noise. The quality problem makes me worry about Internet purchase because of inconvenience of return/exchange. My experience tells me that recent Microsoft hardware quality is inconsistent (probably like its software). I bought a Wireless IntelliMouse Explorer early this year and it had a near dead button (push very hard to make it work).

Another annoyance is the tiny Ctrl keys. Due to the layout design, Ctrl keys are fairly small and easy to miss. I'd rather have smaller Win keys to give space for larger Ctrl keys. Or at least the Ctrl keys don't have to be rounded aggressively at corners. More expensive Microsoft Natural Ergonomic keyboard seems to have slightly bigger Ctrl keys. FWIW, I had a Natural Ergonomic 4000 keyboard that stopped working properly (incorrect/no keystrokes received by the computer) in less than a year.

Easy setup and use: No software is required. The keyboard has USB connector and no USB-to-PS/2 adapter is provided in the package. It probably will work with a USB-to-PS/2 adapter based on what system requirements info says from the Microsoft website. Because it's a USB device, make sure your PC BIOS USB keyboard support is enabled or you lose keyboard control until USB HID (Human Interface Device) driver is loaded.

Spill-resistant keys: This is largely true as long as you don't tilt your keyboard too much or spilled water/coffee below the keys doesn't overflow to the desk. Each key is supported by a cylinder which raises high above the base plate. Base plate has four tiny drain holes. Pry open just one key and you'll understand. I don't know how special function keys at top of the keyboard are protected. They may be more vulnerable.

Save desktop space: False! This keyboard is slightly larger than my Dell Quiet keyboard. It's much bigger than some compact keyboard with razor-thin edges. Basically it takes no more space than your old traditional keyboard.

Ultra-thin profile: Not sure I'll like it or not. Time will tell. It makes me feel like using a notebook but key travel may be comparable to a desktop keyboard. The tactile feedback is close to a notebook keyboard but I can still type pretty fast.

Some other notes:

Special function keys are useful. No software is required but they only work with certain software and cannot be customized. Pictures on Microsoft website are tiny so let me tell you what these special keys are: Back, Forward, Volume Down, Mute, Volume Up, Play/Pause (above vol down, mute, vol up keys), Web/Home, Search and Mail. There is also a Calculator key next to the keyboard status LEDs.

Finally, Microsoft gets rid of the quirky edit keys layout (keys above reverse T toothpick arrow keys) that was popular in its last generation keyboards. The comfort curve keyboard has traditional layout for those keys and that's important to me. I wouldn't use any keyboard without this layout.

So far I'm happy with the purchase. It's a nice and cheap keyboard if you're looking for an ergonomic one. Hopefully, the shortcomings I mentioned above can be fixed in the next version of this keyboard. It's not bad for a v1.0 comfort curve keyboard.

UPDATE: Each special key can be customized once latest IntelliType Pro software is installed. Although Microsoft harware download web site doesn't provide a driver for this keyboard, guess what, this keyboard is listed as the very first one in Keyboard model dropdown list in keyboard settings.

After eight months of use, I still stand behind my comments and it still gets 4 stars :)

UPDATE: I still use it as of September 2012, just not as often only because I spend more time on laptops.
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63 of 66 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good inexpensive upgrade, May 15, 2006
By 
Joseph C. Mooney (Christina Lake, BC Canada) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
For under 20 bucks, this keyboard is a very nice upgrade to the heavily value-engineered keyboard that comes with most computers. (In my case a Dell Quiet-key. It's actually a bit better than most stock keyboards, but still has shortcomings which I won't get into since this is a review of the Microsoft product).

Pros:

o keys have a nice "feel". Light touch, low travel, quiet.

o although this is an ergonomic keyboard, the differences in layout and spacing are minor and easy to adjust to, yet they still offer an improvement in typing comfort.

o nice spacebar, slightly deeper than standard keyboards, is easy to reach.

o reasonable price for a this quality of keyboard.

Cons:

o size: the width is identical to my Dell Quietkey, depth is about 1 inch greater, to accomodate the extra browser-specific buttons which I don't use. If the extra buttons were generic and user programmable this item would be in the Pros category.

Disclaimer - taste in input devices is highly subjective. What works wonderfully for one person can be a nightmare for another. I like this keyboard and find it more comfortable to use than a standard layout. Your mileage may vary.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comfort Curve 2000 and the Mac mini, February 17, 2007
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I am currently using this keyboard on my Mac mini (Intel-based). You can download the latest Intellitype software which is a Universal binary. The keys are programmable using the software (which appears in System Preferences).

The feel of the keyboard is soft to the touch. The curved design does help in making typing easier (there's less strain on the wrists).

So far, this keyboard is worth it for less than $20. It works with the Mac mini too.
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50 of 57 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars pure junk, November 4, 2008
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I bought these keyboards as I like the quiet and low profile. Now I have 3 defective keyboards because some keys do not register (M, N, Caps are common). Microsoft has replaced these for free but I expressed concern that future keyboards will fail. On a Microsoft initiated customer satisfaction followup call, I told the rep that the hardware revision 1.0 is the same so the root cause for these failures have not been fixed. Their only response is to replace in the future and try to keep the customer happy, but I'm out a usable keyboard for 2 weeks. One of my 3 replacements (D, M now don't work) has failed after only 2 months. Used a keycap puller to yank defective ones off and a blower to clean off. Put a 1/4" peg in and these keys still do not trigger. Save your money. I will go back to Logitech and get something that will last its intended "lifetime".

After just sitting there for an hour, both the D and M keys started working. A while later they again just stopped working. This is with the computer on - nothing touched. Now it's looking like an intermittent problem that does not look to be hardware related. Keyboard controller problem is more like what's happening to some of these, so I will definitely not recommend anyone buy this keyboard as it will fail in the long term.

update 2/2/09 - The replacement keyboard above just totally flaked out. Both Alt, both Ctrl, left Shift, and a whole lot of keys don't work. Called Microsoft at 800-360-7561 for a refund. 1) copy of invoice 2) shipping is on me 3) must be the original (but I threw that out when Microsoft sent me a replacement!) 4) Otherwise they will replace it for free again (I'm still within warranty) and I get to throw the defective one out. I chose #4. I also ordered a Logitech Wave keyboard from Amazon as a backup.

Sept 2009 - Both replacements from February 2009 have problems. One has o and 0 not working. The other has z, period, space not working. 6 keyboards in 3 years. 100% defective. I could call Microsoft, but the question is why put myself through having undependable keyboards? Bye Microsoft. I did get a Logitech wireless keyboard/mouse set and it's working fine.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Microsoft got it right with this one, October 17, 2005
By 
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
After being a "split" keyboard user for the last 10 years (since the Microsoft Natural Keyboard), I wanted to try this new "Curve" design. Personally, I feel it surpasses any other keyboard I've used because of the following:

1) The keys feel great. Nice feedback, but still very quiet.

2) It's small. Takes up about the same space as a legal sheet of paper.

3) It's USB. Not a big deal, but PS/2? I think we're done with that.

4) No F-Lock button. F1-F12 are ACTUALLY F1-F12. Previous keyboards from Microsoft (such as the Microsoft Natural Multimedia Keyboard) had a "feature" that made the F keys "function" keys by default. You had to press the F-Lock button to make the F keys, F keys. Start up your computer, and pressing F8 wasn't F8, it was "Forward" on a browser. Irritating, especially if you want to boot into safe mode, then you have to press F-Lock really quick before you can press F8. Dumb. Wouldn't be so bad if you could make the keyboard DEFAULT to the F keys AS F keys, but you couldn't. Every reboot, it set back to the new "improved" F keys.

5) It's cheap. New Microsoft keyboards are $50-$70 for the wireless fancy schmancy models. Basic, no frills, just a great keyboard.

6) Oh yeah, apparently it's spillproof, but I'm not going to chance it by trying it. I'll take Microsoft's word for it.

Only negative about this keyboard is the lack of USB ports on the back like the Microsoft Natural Keyboard Pro. Other than that, 5 stars. Actually, even without that, 5 stars. Cheers to a great product.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Spacebar Noise Solution, August 2, 2007
By 
J. Hussan (San Diego, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I just bought this keyboard for my laptop on sale for $15 (orig. $20) at Office Depot. I immediately noticed that the spacebar key was a lot noiser than the other keys and seemed a bit loose. I thought my keyboard might have been defected until I read other reviews on here that mentioned the same problem.

I am very noise-sensitive and knew that I would never get used to the annoying tapping sound. So, I popped up the spacebar key with a flat-head screw driver to make sure the little metal wire was fully connected to the key; then, I took apart a jumbo cotton ball and bordered the spacebar key area so when the edges of the spacebar key would go down, they would hit the cotton instead of the keyboard. I snapped back on the spacebar key, and voila! Now the spacebar sounds the same as the rest of the keys :D (which are relatively quiet)

Overall, the keyboard is very worth it.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Keyboard - I'm Using It Right Now, November 6, 2006
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I wanted to get a new keyboard to replace my Dell (which has several science projects festering below the keys), and spent a long time at Fry's going testing out the various keyboards. I initially brought home a Logitech and decided that the letters on the keys were too small-and my wife didn't like it. Then a couple of others felt pretty good to type on, but they turned out to be upwards of $50, chock full of buttons and nobbie thingies...I just wanted a simple keyboard.

I had tried the Comfort Curve before but I was looking for something similar to my old keyboard, with the tall keys and tactile feel. But after I returned the Logitech I tried this one again and found that it felt pretty good, and "natural", and not like those split kbs. As others have said, its curviture and gradient sized buttons are set up to match the natural position of your hands; and I find that I type faster with it.

The keys are half the hight(or a squinch more)of the typical kb, and that with the placement of the keys allows your fingers to type without shifting your hands or fingers-which I find myself doing at times. It's almost like pretend typing, where you mimic typing, drumming your fingers on a table top.

Like a previous reviewer mentioned, while this keyboard is VERY quiet the space bar can be rather annoying with the sound it makes. Like that reviewer, once I pried off the shift key there was a metal wire about the size of a paper clip that wasn't locked on to the space bar itself. Once I did this and popped the key back on, the key noise was greatly dulled. Of course I'm writing this review on this keyboard as I "speak", and it is very comfortable.

I highly recommend this - $19/at Fry's - keyboard. Buy it and try it, if after a day or two you don't like it (which I doubt), just return it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Softest and quietest keyboard money can buy, December 1, 2006
By 
Kevin W. (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I have been using this keyboard for about three weeks now and let me tell you, this is the softest most comfortable keyboard I have ever used. At work I use the Microsoft Natural Keyboard which is more "ergonomic" but it is loud and bulky. This keyboard is thin, lightweight, USB connected, and DEAD silent. When I say silent, I mean this keyboard is QUIET. The keys press softly. I highly recommend this keyboard.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Keys Stopped Working, October 13, 2007
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I LOVED this keyboard until the keys stopped working. It's a great, lightweight, quiet design and has just the right amount of "extra" keys. Unfortunately, two of my letters stopped working half the time or more. I'm having trouble finding an alternative.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Feel - Great Value, February 23, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000 (Personal Computers)
I'm a coder, and I spend an enormous amount of time with my keyboards. I'm at several different computers in any given day, and I get more comfortable with some than others. Once in a while, I come across a keyboard that just feels right, in terms of touch and layout.

To be honest, my favorite keyboard right now is not the MS Comfort Curve - it's the Viewsonic KU709 Slim Keyboard, which has perfect feel.

But the MS Comfort Curve is a solid second. And at $15, it's a fantastic value. The only drawback with this keyboard is that while the 'curve' is a more natural position for your hands, it separates the middle keys enough to throw off your touch-typing a bit. If you switch keyboards like I do, this is a tad annoying, but if you spend quality time with it, you'll probably love it.
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Microsoft Comfort Curve Keyboard 2000
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